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  • 1.
    Gustafsson, Gabriella
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Persson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Eriksson, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Strandberg, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Personality traits among burnt out and non-burnt out health-care personnel at the same workplaces: a pilot study.2009In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 336-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress-related illnesses, such as burnout, have increased over the last decade, but not everyone at the same workplace develops burnout, suggesting that individual factors may contribute to this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to describe patterns of personality traits among two groups of health-care personnel from the same workplaces, one group on sick leave due to medically-assessed burnout, and one group with no indication of burnout, respectively. Fourteen psychiatric- (n = 7) and elderly (n = 7)-care units, located in one specific area in a municipality in northern Sweden, participated in this questionnaire-based study. The participants (n = 40), on sick leave due to medically-assessed burnout (n = 20), and those with no indication of burnout (n = 20), respectively, completed Cattell's 16 Personality Factors Questionnaire between February and December 2004. Conventional statistical methods and partial least square regression were used to analyze data. The results showed that the burnout group had lower scores regarding emotional stability and higher scores regarding anxiety than the non-burnout group, but the results also showed a wide variation of personality traits within groups. The most important indicators for belonging to the burnout group were 'openness to changes' and 'anxiety', and for belonging to the non-burnout group, 'emotional stability', 'liveliness', 'privateness' (i.e. forthright or discreet), and 'tension'. The result indicates complex interactions between personality traits and the context in which the individual lives. It seems to be important to increase our awareness of when personality traits may constitute opportunities versus risks in dealing with one's existing circumstances.

  • 2.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Molin, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Health Sciences, University West,Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Patients' experiences of isolation in psychiatric inpatient care: insights from a meta-ethnographic study2019In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 7-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, people with mental ill-health have been isolated from society. Although mental health care has moved from closed to more open forms of care, in many societies care is still provided in locked wards, and people with mental ill-health are sometimes secluded from their fellow patients, families, friends, and visitors. The aim of this study was to illuminate patients' experiences of isolation in psychiatric inpatient care. A systematic review of qualitative research was conducted, and the key findings were subjected to meta-ethnographic synthesis. The findings were twofold: 'being admitted to prison' and 'having access to shelter'. The experience of isolated care as prison-like symbolizes patients' longing for freedom and feeling restricted and limited by rules, stripped of rights, abandoned, controlled, powerless, and unsupported. In contrast, the experience of isolation as shelter symbolizes safety and the opportunity to regain control over one's own situation. A stigmatizing public view holds that people with mental ill-health are dangerous and unpredictable and, therefore, unsafe to themselves and others. Being placed in isolation because these fears contribute to self-stigma among patients. Promoting a sheltered experience in which isolation is used with respect for patients and the reasons are made explicit may encourage recovery. A shift in emphasis in ward culture from observation to engagement is needed to reduce blame, shift patient experiences from prison to shelter, and to support autonomy as a therapeutic intervention.

  • 3.
    Molin, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Patients' experiences of taking part in Time Together - A nursing intervention in psychiatric inpatient care2019In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 551-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study aimed to illuminate patients' experiences of taking part in the nursing intervention Time Together. The data were drawn from 11 individual semi-structured interviews with patients and analysed with qualitative content analysis using an inductive approach. The results show that patients taking part in Time Together felt confirmed and participated on equal terms; thus, they experienced being seen as humans among other humans. Time Together offered patients a break, and they felt strengthened, which contributed to their hopes for recovery. Furthermore, when Time Together was absent patients felt disconfirmed, which fostered feelings of distance from staff. The results support the effectiveness of the intervention, indicating that Time Together may be a tool to facilitate patients' personal recovery. However, the success of the intervention depends on staff compliance with the predetermined structure of the intervention in combination with engagement.

  • 4.
    Molin, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Time Together: a nursing intervention in psychiatric inpatient care : feasibility and effects2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1698-1708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The facilitation of quality time between patients and staff in psychiatric inpatient care is useful to promote recovery and reduce stress experienced by staff. However, interventions are reported to be complex to implement and are poorly described in the literature. This multisite study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effects of the nursing intervention Time Together, using mixed methods. Data consisted of notes from participant observations and logs to evaluate feasibility, and questionnaires to evaluate effects. The primary outcome for patients was quality of interactions, and for staff, it was perceived stress. The secondary outcome for patients was anxiety and depression symptom levels, and for staff, it was stress of conscience. Data were analysed using visual analysis, percentage of nonoverlapping data, and qualitative content analysis. The results showed that Time Together was a feasible intervention, but measurements showed no effects on the two patient outcomes: quality of interactions and anxiety and depressive symptoms and, questionable effects on perceived stress and stress of conscience among staff. Shared responsibility, a friendly approach, and a predictable structure enabled Time Together, while a distant approach and an unpredictable structure hindered the intervention. In conclusion, the intervention proved to be feasible with potential to enable quality interactions between patients and staff using the enabling factors as supportive components. It also had some effects on perceived stress and stress of conscience among staff. Further evaluation is needed to build on the evidence for the intervention.

  • 5.
    Rørtveit, Kristine
    et al.
    Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    Department of Research and Human Resources, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
    The feeling of being trapped in and ashamed of one's own body: A qualitative study of women who suffer from eating difficulties2009In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore women's bodily experiences of suffering from eating difficulties (ED). The research question was: How do women who suffer from ED experience the bodily aspects related to their condition? Women suffering from ED experience problems in both the physical and emotional areas. Few qualitative studies have specifically addressed sufferers' bodily experiences related to ED. An explorative design was used. The data were collected by means of focus group interviews on the subject of ED-related problems, guilt and shame, and being a mother. The interpretation of the qualitative data was inspired by hermeneutic content analysis. The main theme, 'Powerful feelings of being trapped in and ashamed of one's own body', comprised two themes: 'The feeling of being trapped by overwhelming physical sensations' and 'The feeling of being ashamed of one's own body'. Bodily experiences were reported as strong. One clinical implication for nurses is to acknowledge this fact and make it possible for these women to articulate their difficulties, especially those connected to the feelings of being trapped and ashamed. Support groups focusing on these themes could be one way of assisting women and easing some of the negative feelings associated with ED.

  • 6.
    Rørtveit, Kristine
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    Centre for Women's, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Vestfold University College, Tønsberg, Norway.
    The meaning of guilt and shame: a qualitative study of mothers who suffer from eating difficulties2010In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate and interpret guilt and shame expressed by mothers with eating difficulties (ED). The research question was: What is the meaning of guilt and shame experienced by mothers with ED? Experiences of guilt and shame in mothers with ED may be strong, yet concealed, and should be addressed when promoting women's mental health. The study design was explorative, and in-depth interviews were conducted with eight mothers suffering from ED. The data were analysed by means of qualitative content analysis and interpreted according to a hermeneutic approach. The main theme 'Struggling in silence with guilt and shame as a mother living with ED and trying to keep it secret' was interpreted on two levels: emotional, 'Feeling worried about failure and wanting to be successful', and cognitive, 'Having condemning thoughts about one's own sense of responsibility'. In addition, each theme contained two subthemes. Feelings and awareness of guilt and shame are strong; they vary between individuals and are intensified in mothers who suffer from ED. It is important for mental health nurses to help mothers with ED articulate such feelings in order to promote health.

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