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  • 1.
    Andersson, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindqvist, Olav
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics/MMC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    The Institute for Palliative Care, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Science, Lund University and Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Family members' experiences of care of the dying in residential care homes where the Liverpool Care Pathway was used2018In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 194-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Residential care homes (RCHs) are increasingly becoming a common place of death for older people.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe family members' experiences of care of the dying in RCHs where the Liverpool care pathway for the dying patient was used.

    Methods: This study had a descriptive qualitative study design. Fifteen (n=15) individual interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in three themes: being confident in a familiar and warm atmosphere, being involved vs not being involved in end-of-life (EoL) care, and being consoled by witnessing the health professional's endeavour to relieve suffering.

    Significance of results: The results indicated that taking part in a care plan seems to increase family members' feelings of involvement in EoL care. This study also highlights the family members' needs for increased possibilities for EoL discussions with the GP.

  • 2. Baba, Kerstin
    et al.
    Fransson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Use of a modified ESAS in cancer patients: a pilot study of patient and staff experiences2007In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 610-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of a modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) for monitoring symptoms in oncological palliative care.

    Methods: A modified ESAS was delivered daily to 28 patients with advanced cancer. A questionnaire to discover staff members’ opinions on the ESAS was delivered at the end of the study. Structured interviews were used to examine patients’ opinions on the ESAS.

    Results: The mean total ESAS score was 28.9 on inclusion day and 25.8 on Day 3 (p=0.531). Eleven of 21 of the staff considered the ESAS to be a ‘good’ or ‘very good’ way to obtain information about patients’ symptoms. Seventeen of 24 patients who participated in the interview felt that ESAS was easy to fill in, and that there were no missing questions.

    Conclusion: The patients felt that the modified ESAS contained relevant symptoms, and that the questionnaires were easy to fill in. The staff considered the modified ESAS to be a useful instrument for obtaining information about patients’ symptom distress. The modified ESAS is a good instrument for use as part of the daily clinical routine, as well as for monitoring symptoms in palliative oncological care.

  • 3. Benzein, Eva Gunilla
    et al.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Health-promoting conversations about hope and suffering with couples in palliative care.2008In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 439-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Families living with a dying relative face existential challenges which need to be met by caregivers in a dialogue. AIM: To describe couples' experiences of participating in nurse-initiated health-promoting conversations about hope and suffering during home-based palliative care. METHOD: Data comprised semi-structured evaluative interviews with six couples. Each couple together had previously participated in three health-fostering conversations with nurses. Data were analyzed by content. RESULT: Talking with nurses about existential issues such as hope and suffering made couples feel that they were part of a trustful relationship, and that it was a healing experience. It gave them the opportunity to unburden themselves, as well as a way of learning and finding new strategies for managing daily life. CONCLUSION: Health-promoting conversations about hope and suffering should be implemented as a natural part of the caring relationship between caregivers and families in the palliative context.

  • 4.
    Meidell, Liv
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Holritz Rasmussen, Birgit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Acupuncture as an optional treatment for hospice patients with xerostomia: an intervention study2009In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 70% of seriously ill patients with cancer suffer from xerostomia and the associated problems of swallowing, chewing and speaking. This study aims to investigate whether treatment with acupuncture is a viable option for hospice patients with xerostomia. During a 2-year period, 117 patients were assessed for xerostomia. Eighty-two patients were found to have moderate xerostomia. Sixty-seven fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. Of these, 14 were included but only eight completed the study. Ten acupuncture treatments were given during a 5-week period. The effect of acupuncture was measured using a visual analogue scale, and by measuring the saliva production before and after the series of treatment. The results show that all the patients experienced alleviation of dryness of the mouth and the associated symptoms, and thus benefited from the acupuncture treatment. However, conducting a 5-week acupuncture intervention study is not feasible at an inpatient hospice due to the patients being too close to death.

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