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  • 1.
    Brännström, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Strategic Research Program in Health Care Sciences (SFO-V), "Bridging Research and Practice for Better Health", Karolinska institutet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Nilsson, Ulrica G
    Svedberg, Petra
    Thylén, Ingela
    Sexual Knowledge in Patients With a Myocardial Infarction and Their Partners2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 332-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: Sexual health and sexual activity are important elements of an individual's well-being. For couples, this topic is often affected after a myocardial infarction (MI). It has become increasingly clear that, after an MI, patients are insufficiently educated on how to resume normal sexual activity. However, sufficient data on the general knowledge that patients and partners have about sexual activity and MI are lacking. OBJECTIVE:: The aims of this study were to explore and compare patients' and partners' sexual knowledge 1 month after a first MI and 1 year after the event and to compare whether the individual knowledge had changed over time. A second aim was to investigate whether patients and their partners report receiving information about sexual health and sexual activity from healthcare professionals during the first year after the event and how this information was perceived. SUBJECTS AND METHODS:: This descriptive, comparative survey study enrolled participants from 13 Swedish hospitals in 2007-2009. A total of 115 patients with a first MI and their partners answered the Sex After MI Knowledge Test questionnaire 1 month after the MI and 1 year after the event. Correct responses generated a maximum score of 75. RESULTS:: Only 41% of patients and 31% of partners stated that they had received information on sex and relationships at the 1 year follow-up. The patients scored 51 ± 10 on the Sex After MI Knowledge Test at inclusion into the study, compared with the 52 ± 10 score for the partners. At the 1-year follow-up, the patients' knowledge had significantly increased to a score of 55 ± 7, but the partners' knowledge did not significantly change (53 ± 10). CONCLUSIONS:: First MI patients and their partners reported receiving limited information about sexual issues during the cardiac rehabilitation and had limited knowledge about sexual health and sexual activity.

  • 2. Forslund, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Meanings of people's lived experiences of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, 1 month after the event2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival rate has been poor and stable for a long time, but more recent studies describe its increase. However, there are few studies in which people narrate their experiences from surviving. Objective: The aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of people's lived experiences of surviving an OHCA with validated myocardial infarction (MI) etiology, 1 month after the event. Methods: A purposive sample of 2 women and 9 men was interviewed between February 2011 and May 2012. A phenomenological hermeneutical method was used for analysis, which involved 3 steps: naive reading and understanding, structural analysis, and comprehensive understanding. Results: There were 2 themes, (1) returning to life and (2) revaluing life, and five subthemes, (1a) waking up and missing the whole picture, (1b) realizing it was not time to die, (2a) wondering why and seeking explanations, (2b) feeling ambiguous in relations, and (2c) wondering whether life will be the same. All were constructed from the analysis. Conclusions: Surviving an OHCA with validated MI etiology meant waking up and realizing that one had experienced a cardiac arrest and had been resuscitated. These survivors had memory loss and a need to know what had happened during the time they were dead/unconscious. They searched for a reason why they experienced an MI and cardiac arrest and had gone from being "heart-healthy'' to having a lifelong illness. They all had the experience of passing from life to death and back to life again. For the participants, these differences led to a revaluation of what is important in life.

  • 3.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    The Process of Care-seeking for Myocardial Infarction Among Patients With Diabetes2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 30, no 5, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: People with diabetes have a higher risk for myocardial infarction (MI) than do people without diabetes. It is extremely important that patients with MI seek medical care as soon as possible after symptom onset because the shorter the time from symptom onset to treatment, the better the prognosis.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore how people with diabetes experience the onset of MI and how they decide to seek care.

    METHODS: We interviewed 15 patients with diabetes, 7 men and 8 women, seeking care for MI. They were interviewed 1 to 5 days after their admission to hospital. Five of the participants had had a previous MI; 5 were being treated with insulin; 5, with a combination of insulin and oral antidiabetic agents; and 5, with oral agents only. Data were analyzed according to grounded theory.

    RESULTS: The core category that emerged, "becoming ready to act," incorporated the related categories of perceiving symptoms, becoming aware of illness, feeling endangered, and acting on illness experience. Our results suggest that responses in each of the categories affect the care-seeking process and could be barriers or facilitators in timely care-seeking. Many participants did not see themselves as susceptible to MI and MI was not expressed as a complication of diabetes.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diabetes engaged in a complex care-seeking process, including several delaying barriers, when they experienced symptoms of an MI. Education for patients with diabetes should include discussions about their increased risk of MI, the range of individual variation in symptoms and onset of MI, and the best course of action when possible symptoms of MI occur.

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  • 4.
    Isaksson, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Zingmark, Karin
    FoU enheten, Luleå, Norrbottens läns landsting.
    Older women's prehospital experiences of their first myocardial infarction: a qualitative analysis from the Northern Sweden MONICA Study2013In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 360-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few qualitative studies have been conducted on older women’s experiences of myocardial infarction (MI) and, in particular, the time before they seek medical care.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore older women’s prehospital experiences of their first MI.

    Methods: Qualitative content analysis was performed on data from individual interviews with 20 women, aged 65 to 80 years (mean, 73.0 years). The participants were interviewed 3 days after admission to a hospital for a confirmed first MI.

    Results: The women perceived their symptoms as a strange and unfamiliar development from indistinct physical sensations to persistent and overwhelming chest pain. Throughout the prehospital phase, they used different strategies such as downplaying and neglecting the symptoms. The symptoms were seen as intrusions in their daily lives, against which the participants defended themselves to remain in control and to maintain social responsibilities. As their symptoms evolved into constant chest pain, the women began to realize the seriousness of their symptoms. When the pain became unbearable, the women took the decision to seek medical care.

    Conclusion: Understanding the complex experiences of older women in the prehospital phase is essential to reducing their patient decision times. The findings of this study should be incorporated into the education of professionals involved in the care of cardiac patients, including those who answer informational and emergency telephone lines.

  • 5.
    Olsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Experiences of and Coping With Severe Aortic Stenosis Among Patients Waiting for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation2016In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 255-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valve disease in Western countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has made it possible to treat patients with higher surgical risks. These patients are informed about their poor prognosis with only months or a few years to live without treatment. Because of their severe symptoms, limitations, and suffering, patients awaiting TAVI need special attention.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to describe patients' experiences of coping with severe AS and of waiting for TAVI.

    METHODS: Swedish participants (n = 24; 9 women, 15 men) with a mean (SD) age of 80 (7.4) years who had been offered TAVI all agreed to participate in a presurgical interview. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The participants' experiences of coping with AS and awaiting TAVI were described by the main theme "living on the edge, but trying to stay in control," which comprised 3 categories: "trying to cope with physical symptoms and anxiety," "trying to preserve self and self-esteem despite life-threatening illness," and "trying to process the decision to undergo TAVI."

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with AS and awaiting TAVI must cope with increasing symptoms and limitations in their social lives but still wish to be seen as the people they always have been. These patients may need extra support from healthcare personnel to process their experiences, which could help them to attach personal meaning to clinical information about the condition and its treatment that they could include in their decision about whether to undergo TAVI. Listening to patients' stories could help nurses and physicians to ensure that disease and treatment are meaningfully understood by the patient.

  • 6.
    Olsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Patients' Decision Making About Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis2016In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 523-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Aortic stenosis is the most common valve disease in Western countries, and its prevalence is increasing because of the aging population. Some patients, denied surgery because of high risk, can be offered transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). These patients are old and have comorbidities, and it is not always easy for them to make the decision about accepting TAVI.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the decision-making process about undergoing TAVI treatment among people with severe aortic stenosis who are denied surgery.

    METHODS: The Swedish participants (n = 24) with a mean age of 80 years who had been offered TAVI all agreed to participate in a presurgical interview. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Three patterns in the decision-making process about TAVI treatment-ambivalent, obedient, and reconciled-were identified. The ambivalent patient is unsure of the value of treatment and aware of the risks; the obedient patient is unsure of the value of one's own decision and wants to leave the decision to others; the reconciled patient has reached a point where there is no choice anymore and is always sure that the decision to undergo TAVI is right.

    CONCLUSIONS: People with aortic stenosis who are offered TAVI need to discuss the risks and benefits in order to participate in decision making about the treatment. They have different patterns in decision making and would benefit from healthcare professionals being observant of them to support them in this process in a manner consistent with their values.

1 - 6 of 6
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