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  • 1.
    Aléx, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older in the north of Sweden2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 451-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to analyse the construction of masculinities among men aged 85 and older. BACKGROUND: All societies have a gender order, constructed from multiple ideas of what is seen as feminine and masculine. As the group of men aged 85 and older is increasing in size and their demand for care will increase, we must recognize the importance of studying these men and various discourses of masculinities. DESIGN: Qualitative explorative. METHODS: Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse thematic narratives. Masculinity theories provided the point of departure for the analysis. RESULTS: The analysis coalesced into three masculinities. 'Being in the male centre', developed from subthemes as: taking pride in one's work and economic situation; being in the centre in relation to others; regarding women as sexual objects; and belonging to a select group. 'Striving to maintain the male facade' developed from subthemes as: emphasizing 'important' connections; having feelings of loss; striving to maintain old norms and rejecting the fact of being old. 'Being related' was formulated from subthemes as: feeling at home with domestic duties; being concerned; accepting one's own aging; and reflecting on life. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates the importance of being aware of the existence of multiple masculinities, in contrast to the generally unproblematic and unsubtle particular healthcare approaches which consider men as simply belonging to one masculinity. Relevance to clinical practice. Diverse masculinities probably affect encounters between men and healthcare providers and others who work with an older population and therefore our results are of importance in a caring context.

  • 2.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Department of Caring Science and Sociology, University of Gävle, Gävle.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrica K
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care and Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences,.
    The female partners’ experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Backman, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Job strain in nursing homes: exploring the impact of leadership2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 7-8, p. 1552-1560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To explore the association between nursing home managers' leadership, job strain and social support as perceived by direct care staff in nursing homes.

    Background: It is well known that aged care staff experience high levels of job strain, and that aged care staff experiencing job strain are exposed to increased risk for adverse health effects. Leadership styles have been associated with job strain in the literature; however, the impact of perceived leadership on staff job strain and social support has not been clarified within nursing home contexts.

    Design: This study had a cross‐sectional design.

    Methods: Participating staff (n = 3,605) completed surveys which included questions about staff characteristics, valid and reliable measures of nursing home managers' leadership, perceived job strain and social support. Statistical analyses of correlations and multiple regression analysis with interaction terms were conducted.

    Results: Nursing home managers' leadership were significantly associated with lower level of job strain and higher level of social support among direct care staff. A multiple regression analysis including an interaction term indicated individual and joint effects of nursing home managers' leadership and social support on job strain.

    Conclusions: Nursing home managers' leadership and social support were both individually and in combination associated with staff perception of lesser job strain. Thus, nursing home managers' leadership are beneficial for the working situation and strain of staff.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Promoting a supporting work environment through leadership is an important implication for nursing home managers as it can influence staff perception of job strain and social support within the unit. By providing leadership, offering support and strategies towards a healthy work environment, nursing home managers can buffer adverse health effects among staff.

  • 4.
    Bay, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Berghammer, Malin
    Sandberg, Camilla
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    It's like balancing on a slackline: a description of how adults with congenital heart disease describe themselves in relation to physical activity2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 15-16, p. 3131-3138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To illuminate how adults with CHD describe themselves in relation to physical activity.

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have reduced exercise capacity and do not reach the recommended daily level of physical activity. With this in view, it is of immense importance to investigate how this population experiences physical activity.

    DESIGN: Qualitative study with semi-structured interviews analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were individually performed with fourteen adults (women=7, age 19-68 years) with complex CHD. Patients were purposively recruited from the clinic waiting list, based on a scheduled follow-up and diagnosis.

    RESULTS: The overall theme, It's like balancing on a slackline, illustrates how adults with CHD described themselves in relation to physical activity. This overall theme consisted of four subthemes: (1) Being an adventurer- enjoying the challenges of physical activity; (2) Being a realist- adapting to physical ability; (3) Being a non-doer- lacking prerequisites for physical activity; and (4) Being an outsider- feeling excluded depending on physical ability.

    CONCLUSIONS: Adults with CHD seem to have a diverse relationship to physical activity and it involves various aspects throughout the lifespan. The findings point out factors that might constitute as obstacles for being physically active, specific for people with chronic conditions like CHD. This highlights the importance of further exploring the hindering and facilitating factors for being physically active in order to get a deeper understanding of how to support adults with CHD to be physically active.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Given the diverse relationship to physical activity, nurses have to further investigate the patients' relationship to physical activity, in order to support a healthy lifestyle. Nurses and allied health professionals should offer individualized exercise prescriptions and education about suitable physical activities in relation to physical ability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 5. Bergland, Adel
    et al.
    Hofoss, Dag
    Kirkevold, Marit
    Vassbo, Tove
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Person-centred ward climate as experienced by mentally lucid residents in long-term care facilities2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 3-4, p. 406-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To assess the content validity and reliability of the Person-centred Climate Questionnaire-Patient version in long-term care facilities, to describe residents' perceptions of the extent to which their ward climate was person-centred and to explore whether person-centredness was associated with facility and resident characteristics, such as facility and ward size, having a sensory garden and having a primary caregiver.

    Background. The importance of the physical environment to persons with dementia has been investigated. However, research is lacking regarding the extent to which mentally lucid residents experience their physical and psycho-social ward climate as person-centred and the factors influencing their experience.

    Design. Cross-sectional survey design.

    Methods. The Person-centred Climate Questionnaire-Patient version was translated into Norwegian with forward and backward translation. The content validity index for scales was assessed. The Person-centred Climate Questionnaire-Patient version was completed by 145 mentally lucid residents in 17 Norwegian long-term care facilities. Reliability was assessed by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlations. Test-retest reliability was assessed by paired samples t-test and Spearman's correlation. To explore differences based on facility and resident characteristics, independent-samples t-test and one-way ANOVA were used.

    Results. The content validity index for scales was satisfactory. The Person-centred Climate Questionnaire-Patient version was internally consistent and had satisfactory test-retest reliability. The climate was experienced as highly person-centred. No significant differences were found, except that residents in larger facilities experienced the climate as more person-centred in relation to everyday activities (subscale 2) than residents in smaller facilities.

    Conclusion. The Norwegian version of the Person-centred Climate Questionnaire-Patient version can be regarded as reliable in a long-term care facility context. Perceived degree of person-centredness was not associated with facility or resident characteristics, such as the number of residents, having a sensory garden or knowing that one has a primary caregiver.

    Relevance to clinical practice. A person-centred climate can be attained in different kinds of long-term care facilities.

  • 6.
    Claesson Lingehall, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Cardiothoracic Surgery Division, Heart Center.
    Smulter, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Cardiothoracic Surgery Division, Heart Center.
    Engström, Karl Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Cardiothoracic Surgery Division, Heart Center.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Nursing, The Strategic Research Programme in Care Sciences, Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Orthopedic Surgery, University of Umeå.
    Validation of the Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale used in patients 70 years and older undergoing cardiac surgery2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 19-20, p. 2858-2866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Validation of the Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale as a screening tool for nurses to use to detect postoperative delirium in patients 70 years and older undergoing cardiac surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Delirium is common among old patients after cardiac surgery. Underdiagnosis and poor documentation of postoperative delirium is problematic, and nurses often misread the signs.

    DESIGN: A prospective observational study.

    METHODS: Patients (n = 142) scheduled for cardiac surgery were assessed three times daily by the nursing staff using the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale. Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was compared with the Mini Mental State Examination and the Organic Brains Syndrome Scale, evaluated day one and day four postoperatively. Delirium was diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - DSM-IV-TR criteria.

    RESULTS: A larger proportion of patients were diagnosed with delirium according to the Mini Mental State Examination and Organic Brains Syndrome Scale compared with the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale, both on day one and day four. The Nursing Delirium Screening Scale protocol identified the majority of hyperactive and mixed delirium patients, whereas several with hypoactive delirium were unrecognised.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was easily incorporated into clinical care and showed high sensitivity in detecting hyperactive symptoms of delirium. However, in the routine use by nurses, the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale had low sensitivity in detecting hypoactive delirium, the most prevalent form of delirium after cardiac surgery. Nursing Delirium Screening Scale probably has to be combined with cognitive testing to detect hypoactive delirium.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses play a key role in detecting delirium. The Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was easy incorporated instrument for clinical practice and identified the majority of hyperactive and mixed delirium, but several of the patients with hypoactive delirium were unrecognised. Training of assessment and cognitive testing seems to be necessary to detect hypoactive delirium.

  • 7.
    Dalheim-Englund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Rydström, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Rasmussen, Birgit Holritz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Möller, Christian
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Having a child with asthma: quality of life for Swedish parents2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 386-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is the most common chronic childhood disease. Childhood asthma contributes significantly to morbidity among children and has a significant impact on the quality of life (QoL) and daily routines of both the children and their parents. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate how Swedish parents of children with asthma experience their QoL, and to investigate whether there were differences concerning QoL between parents within the same family. The purpose was also to investigate possible connections between their QoL and background variables. METHOD: A total of 371 parents of children with asthma (57% mothers and 43% fathers) participated in the study. The Paediatric Asthma Caregiver's Quality Of Life Questionnaire (PACQLQ) was used to measure the parents' QoL, i.e. how the child's asthma interferes with the parents' normal activities and how it has made them feel. RESULTS: The findings show that most parents of children with asthma evaluated their QoL as close to the positive end of the scale, and there was close agreement in the scoring between parents within the same family. Significant associations were found between parents' lower QoL outcome and living in the North of Sweden. There were also significant associations between fathers' lower QoL outcome and having a child younger than 13 years of age and mothers' lower QoL outcome and having a child with severe asthma. Although the result shows that a child's asthma did not influence the parents' QoL to a greater degree, it is still important for healthcare workers to help these parents to sustain and improve their well-being. CONCLUSIONS: The fact that they just evaluated their QoL during the preceding week only, and did so at the time when their children were being treated with asthma medication, might have influenced the results in a positive direction.

  • 8.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Commentary on McCance T, Slater P & McCormack B (2009) Using the caring dimensions inventory as an indicator of person-centred nursing. Journal of Clinical Nursing 18, 409-417.2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 3-4, p. 592-593Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Fetherstonhaugh, Deirdre
    Australian Centre for Evidence-Based Aged Care (ACEBAC), La Trobe University.
    Nay, Rhonda
    Australian Centre for Evidence-Based Aged Care (ACEBAC), La Trobe University.
    Promoting a continuation of self and normality: person-centred care as described by people with dementia, their family members and aged care staff2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 17-18, p. 2611-2618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This article aims to describe the content of person-centred care as described by people with dementia, family members and staff in residential aged care.

    BACKGROUND: Person-centred care is increasingly being regarded as synonymous with best quality aged care; however, studies exploring stakeholders' experiences of person-centred care are few.

    DESIGN: A qualitative explorative design was employed using conversational research interviews and content analysis.

    METHOD: Research interviews were conducted in 2007 and 2008 with staff working in aged care (n = 37), people with early onset dementia (n = 11), and family members of patients with dementia (n = 19) and were analysed using content analysis.

    RESULTS: The findings indicated that the core category of person-centred care was promoting a continuation of self and normality. Five content categories emerged as contributing to promoting a continuation of self and normality: knowing the person; welcoming family; providing meaningful activities; being in a personalised environment; and experiencing flexibility and continuity.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study describes person-centred care as it is understood by people with dementia, their family members and staff in residential aged care, and as such it contributes with inside perspectives to current understandings of person-centred care, perspectives that have been largely lacking. Relevance to clinical practice.  The findings of this study are clinically relevant and ready to be operationalised and applied in clinical aged care. The categories can be used as a topic guide for discussions in aged care organisations on the quality of current care and as elements indicating how to increase the person-centredness of care provided.

  • 10.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Fetherstonhaugh, Deirdre
    Nay, Rhonda
    The Tool for Understanding Residents' Needs as Individual Persons (TURNIP): construction and initial testing2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 19-20, p. 2890-2896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To construct and evaluate an intervention tool for increasing the person-centredness of care in residential aged care services.

    Background: Providing care that is person-centred and evidence-based is increasingly being regarded as synonymous with best quality aged care. However, consensus about how person-centred care should be defined, operationalised and implemented has not yet been reached.

    Design: Literature reviews, expert consultation (= 22) and stakeholder interviews (= 67) were undertaken to develop the Tool for Understanding Residents’ Needs as Individual Persons (TURNIP).

    Methods: Statistical estimates of validity and reliability were employed to evaluate the tool in an Australian convenience sample of aged care staff (= 220).

    Results: The 39 item TURNIP conceptualised person-centred care into five dimensions: (1) the care environment, (2) staff members’ attitudes towards dementia, (3) staff members’ knowledge about dementia, (4) the care organisation and (5) the content of care provided. Psychometric testing indicated satisfactory validity and reliability, as shown for example in a total Cronbach’s alpha of 0·89.

    Conclusions: The TURNIP adds to current literature on person-centred care by presenting a rigorously developed intervention tool based on an explicit conceptual structure that can inform the design, employment and communication of clinical interventions aiming to promote person-centred care.

    Relevance to clinical practice: The TURNIP contains clinically relevant items that are ready to be applied in clinical aged care. The tool can be used as a base for clinical interventions applying discussions in aged care organisations about the quality of current care and how to increase person-centredness of the care provided.

  • 11.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Austin Health Clinical School of Nursing, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Mahoney, Anne-Marie
    Hardy, Juanita
    McGillion, Tony
    McLean, Anne
    Pearce, Frances
    Salamone, Kathryn
    Watt, Elizabeth
    Psychometric performance of the English language six-item Caring Behaviours Inventory in an acute care context2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 17-18, p. 2538-2544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesThis study aimed to evaluate the psychometric performance of the six-item Caring Behaviours Inventory in a sample of Australian acute hospital inpatients. BackgroundCaring is significant for nursing, and exploring the prevalence of staff-caring behaviours is imperative for high-quality acute care. There is a need for psychometrically sound scales that measures caring in acute care, without imposing extensive respondent burden. DesignA cross-sectional survey design was used to distribute the six-item Caring Behaviours Inventory to an Australian sample of hospital inpatients (n=210) in December 2012. MethodPsychometric evaluation included item performance, construct validity and internal consistency reliability. ResultsThe six-item Caring Behaviours Inventory had satisfactory psychometric performance as evidenced by normally distributed scores, a uni-dimensional structure explaining 65% of variance in data, a total Cronbach's of 089 and corrected item-total correlations between 051-082. ConclusionThe six-item Caring Behaviours Inventory had satisfactory estimates of validity and reliability when tested in an Australian sample of acute hospital inpatients. The tool contributes to the literature by being a brief and nonburdensome alternative with seemingly strong psychometric properties to be used in future measures of caring in nursing. Relevance to clinical practiceThe six-item Caring Behaviours Inventory provides a psychometrically tested fundament for reflective clinical discussions on how nurse behaviours facilitate or impede patient experiences of caring. This can benefit quality development in clinical practice as being in tune with patient experiences and expectations is fundamental to high quality services and patient satisfaction.

  • 12.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nordvall, Karin
    Lost in the present but confident of the past: experiences of being in a psycho-geriatric unit as narrated by persons with dementia2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 491-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To illuminate meanings of being in a psycho-geriatric unit. Background. There are known risks associated with moving persons with dementia from home to an institution, but little is known about how they experience being in psycho-geriatric units.

    METHOD: Using open-ended research interviews, six persons with mild to severe dementia were asked to narrate about their experiences in the hospital. The interviews were interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutical method of analysis.

    RESULTS: The comprehensive understanding of being in a psycho-geriatric unit points towards an understanding of being lost in the present but confident of the past. The analysis showed that the participants appeared lost as they could not narrate where they were and why, but that they became confident when narrating about their previous life. The analysis also showed that being in the hospital meant sharing living space with strangers, invasions of private space and establishing new acquaintances. Being in the unit could also mean boredom and devaluation for participants. The interviews were interpreted in the light of narrative theory of identity: persons with dementia narrating about previous life experiences as to make claims of how to be interpreted by others; as persons instead of merely as 'demented' patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Experiences of care narrated by persons with dementia present meaningful and useful information that can provide feedback to inform care practice.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Experiences of care from persons with dementia provide meaningful information about care and the doing and being of staff. Creating time for conversations with these persons may facilitate well-being.

  • 13.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Rasmussen, Birgit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Forecasting the ward climate: a study from a dementia care unit2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 7-8, p. 1136-1144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. This article present findings from a study aiming to explore the psychosocial climate and its influence on the well-being of people with dementia in a psycho-geriatric hospital unit.

    Background. Environmental influence in dementia is well explored in relation to the physical environment; however, few studies have explored the psychosocial environment and its influence on well-being.

    Design. The study had a grounded theory design.

    Methods. Participant observations were conducted in a psycho-geriatric ward for assessment and treatment of people with dementia in Sweden (n = 36 hours). Data were collected and analysed in a dialectical fashion using the principles of grounded theory methodology.

    Results. The basic social process that best accounted for the variation in the psychosocial climate and well-being of patients at the unit was 'staff presence or absence', conceptualised as the core category. Three categories emerged in relation to the core category; 'sharing place and moment', 'sharing place but not moment' and 'sharing neither place nor moment'.

    Conclusions. Staff were catalysts for the psychosocial climate and when being present and engaged they could create a climate interpreted as at-homeness which supported patient well-being. When being absent, the climate quickly became anxious and this facilitated patient ill-being. To provide quality care for people with dementia staff need to be aware of their role in setting the emotional tone of the psychosocial climate and also that this emotional tone significantly influences patient well-being.

    Relevance to clinical practice. The findings are clinically relevant and can be operationalised and applied in clinical practice. Awareness of the intimate connection between staff presence and absence, the psychosocial climate and patient well-being highlights an ethical responsibility to question: routines that promote staff absence; a culture of merely 'doing for'; and nursing tasks which involve a minimum of staff-patient interaction. The findings have implications for managers as well as for clinical staff.

  • 14.
    Edvardsson, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Sandman, PO
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Rasmussen, Birgit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Meanings of giving touch in the care of older patients: becoming a valuable person and professional2003In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 601-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch is central to nursing and health care workers frequently touch their patients, consciously or unconsciously in their interactions with them. Most literature has studied touch from a patient perspective, thus inquiry about professionals' experiences are rare. The aim of this study was to illuminate meanings of giving touch in nursing care of older patients. To understand the meaning of lived experiences of giving touch in care of older patients, interviews with 12 health care professionals in northern Sweden were analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach influenced by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The findings show that giving touch in the care of older patients is a transforming experience, where one suddenly perceives oneself as both a valuable person and professional who no longer powerlessly confronts patients' haunted and disrupted bodies, but who, by means of touch, has gained power to ease this suffering. The experience also transforms the way one regards older patients. Instead of seeing a severely demanding patient suffering from dementia and/or pain, one is able to see the person behind the disease as a human being, like oneself. A relationship described as calm, friendly and humane is created between caregiver and patient when giving touch, a relationship that transcends the moment of touch and influences one's way of caring. This understanding is presented using the theoretical framework of the philosophy of Marcel. Giving touch has the power to shed new light on health care professionals' experiences of caring for older patients suffering from dementia and/or pain, giving them the power to be a valuable person and professional.

  • 15.
    Efraimsson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Holritz Rasmussen, Birgit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Gilje, Fredricka
    Sandman, Per Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Expressions of power and powerlessness in discharge planning: a case study of an older woman on her way home2003In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 717-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this case study was to illuminate and describe the phenomenon of power as it appeared in a discharge planning conference. The patient was an older woman who needed long-term care as a result of stroke and heart failure. Data comprised transcriptions of a video-recorded discharge planning conference and two audio-recorded interviews focusing on the patient's experience of the discharge planning conference. The findings reveal that the content of the discharge planning conference focused on the patient's medical state and routine administrative protocols. Analysis of the participants' activities, strategies and attitudes during the conference indicate that the professional carers dominated the conversation. Analysis further reveals that the patient experienced a feeling of powerlessness and of being treated as an object. The findings are interpreted and discussed based on the concepts of 'institutional frame' and 'client's frame', derived from Agar's theory of institutional discourse.

  • 16.
    Efraimsson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Sandman, P O
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Discharge planning: "fooling ourselves?"--patient participation in conferences.2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 562-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of discharge planning conferences (DPCs) is to co-ordinate resources and to enhance patient involvement in care in connection with relocation from hospital. DPCs can be characterized as institutional conversations, and are often executed as standard procedures, but the scientific basis for the activity is weak. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to illuminate and describe the communication at DPCs. DESIGN: A purposeful and consecutive sample of eight DPCs was collected in which the future care of eight women, aged 70 years or more, was discussed. METHODS: Transcribed video recordings were analysed in two steps. "The initial analysis" aimed at describing the structure and content of the communication. This description constituted the basis for an interpretation, leading to "the focused analysis" aiming at finding evidence for the assumptions made in the interpretation. RESULTS: The result revealed that the participation of patients was very less the DPCs. The decisions had often already been made, and the women were expected to be pleased with the decision; institutional representatives (IRs) frequently justified their actions by referring to bureaucratic praxis. CONCLUSIONS: The women were both encouraged and excluded from participation by the IRs. This dichotomy occurred because the IRs, as professionals, struggled to simultaneously realize their caring mission and their obligation to enforce the values and rules of the institution, i.e. efficiency and rationality. Thus, IRs and patients were equally imprisoned within the institutional system. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL RESEARCH: This result illustrates how conflicting paradigms are imbedded and reproduced by healthcare professionals in their communicative praxis. Awareness of this is a prerequisite for improvements in working procedures congruent with a caring paradigm that support patient participation.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    Högskolan i Buskerud, Norge.
    Older women's experiences of suffering from urinary tract infections2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 9-10, p. 1385-1394Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe and explore older women's experiences of having had repeated urinary tract infections (UTIs).

    Background: UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections among older women. Approximately one-third of very old women suffer from at least one UTI each year. Despite the high incidence of UTI, little is known about the impact of UTI on health and daily life in older women.

    Design: A qualitative descriptive design.

    Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with 20 Swedish women aged 67–96 years who suffered from repeated UTIs the preceding year. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Two main themes were identified: being in a state of manageable suffering and depending on alleviation. Being in a state of manageable suffering was described in terms of experiencing physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness and being restricted in daily life. Depending on alleviation was illustrated in terms of having access to relief but also receiving inadequate care.

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that UTIs are a serious health problem among older women that not only affects both physical and mental health but also has serious social consequences. The women in this study described the physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness, being restricted in daily life, depending on access to relief and receiving inadequate care.

    Relevance to clinical practice: It is important to improve the knowledge about how UTI affects the health of older women. This knowledge may help nurses develop strategies to support these women. One important part in the supportive strategies is that nurses can educate these women in self-care.

  • 18. Fjelltun, Aud-Mari Sohini
    et al.
    Henriksen, Nils
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gilje, Fredricka
    Normann, Hans Ketil
    Carers' and nurses' appraisals of needs of nursing home placement for frail older in Norway2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 22, p. 3079-3088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aim of this paper was to explore carers' and nurses' appraisals concerning if and when nursing home placement for frail older people awaiting placement was needed and to illuminate ethical issues involved in decisions regarding nursing home placement.

    Background. Requesting nursing home placement can be a complicated decision for carers, causing feelings of failure, anxiety and guilt. After the necessity of nursing home care is determined, the names of the older people are put on waiting lists. While waiting, home health care provides support services. Even with this care, many of the older people and their carers face difficult life situations.

    Design. This is a descriptive and comparative cross-sectional study using qualitative methods.

    Methods. The convenience sample (n = 36) comprised 11 carers of older people on a nursing home placement waiting list in Norway and 11 nurses caring for these older people. Every one willingly participated in interviews that were transcribed and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results. Various similarities and differences between nurses' and carers' appraisals were found. Complex ethical issues of justice, equality, autonomy, beneficence and justifiability in nursing were involved in decision making concerning nursing home placement. Four categories constructed were: 'appraising nursing home to be the level of care needed', 'appraising the older people as able to continue living at home', 'being ambivalent about nursing home placement' and 'being sceptical about use of coercion regarding nursing home placement'.

    Conclusions. Not all of the older people awaiting nursing home placements could be placed in nursing homes when beds became available. The situations were complex and involved ethical issues. Relevance to clinical practice. Despite insufficient resources in home health care, providing appropriate support for older people and their carers means that nurses have to consider individual concerns in each situation, cooperate with carers, respect their appraisals of needs and argue for the timely nursing home placement of older people.

  • 19.
    Forsberg, Karl A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Influence of a lifestyle intervention among persons with a psychiatric disability: a cluster randomised controlled trail on symptoms, quality of life and sense of coherence2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 11-12, p. 1519-1528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving physical health with lifestyle programmes in the form of study circles and when involving their cares will in addition to increased physical health end in improved sense of coherence.

  • 20.
    Forsberg, Karl Anton
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. The Vårdal Institute, the Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Sandman, Per Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Influence of a life style intervention among persons with a psychiatric disability: a cluster randomised controlled trial on symptoms, quality of life and sense of coherence2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 11-12, p. 1519-1528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate how a life style intervention programme influences psychiatric and psychosocial factors among persons with psychiatric disabilities.

     Background: Persons with psychiatric disabilities often suffer from a simultaneous physical health problem, where circulatory disorder, hyperlipideamia, digestive disease, diabetes mellitus and obesity are prevalent. Studies have also shown a relationship between physical activity and mental health. But few randomised controlled trails have been aimed specifically at life style interventions and their effect on psychiatric health and quality of life among persons with psychiatric disabilities.

    Design: a cluster randomised controlled trail.

    Methods: Forty one persons with a DSM- ІV diagnosis in eight supported housing facilities and two housing support programmes and their carers were on cluster level randomly assigned to a 12 month health intervention programme in the form of study circles with diet sessions and physical activities or a control programme. The changes in the mean of quality of life, level of functioning, psychiatric symptoms and sense of coherence was investigated and its relationship to physical health and attendance.

    Results: A significant increase in the sense of coherence was seen in both programmes but also significant improvements in the intervention group compared to controls at the follow-up.

    Conclusions: Structured activities in the form of life style intervention programmes with a sufficient level of challenge that encourage persons with psychiatric disabilities to participate in activities in a social context may contribute to a significant increase in the sense of coherence.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Improving physical health with life style programmes in the form of study circles and when involving their cares will in addition to increased physical health end in improved sense of coherence.

  • 21. Forslund, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Sudden cardiac death among people with diabetes: preventive measures documented in their medical records2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 23-24, p. 3401-3409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examination of medical records of people with diabetes mellitus showed that documentation could be more informative and systematic. It is important to achieve better adherence to treatment and to increase people's understanding of their illness.

  • 22.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Jansson, Lilian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Injured road users' experience of care in the emergency department2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 726-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the patients' perceptions of quality of care (QoC) in an emergency department (ED) and to analyse associations between patients' background characteristics and estimated QoC.

    BACKGROUND: Each year 1.4 out of every 100 inhabitants are injured in the traffic environment and receive care at the ED. No study has yet analysed different injured road users' perceived QoC, or how important they rate different caring dimensions.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study at the ED, in the University Hospital in Umeå, Sweden.

    METHOD: A stratified consecutive sample of 166 car occupants, 200 cyclists and 199 pedestrians, aged 18-70 years, all injured in the traffic environment. Data were collected from medical records and from a mail survey using a short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire, modified for ED use. The statistical methods used included Mann-Whitney's U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and multiple logistic regression.

    RESULTS: The perceived QoC and the subjective importance of the corresponding QoC dimensions were rated at the 'better' half of the rating scale, with no differences between the different road user categories. The most prominent factors associated with a positive perceived QoC rating were a short waiting time, moderate or serious injuries and high age as well as high educational level of the injury victim. For the subjective importance, a short waiting time was rated as the most important but slight differences were seen, related to education and sex.

    CONCLUSION: The association patterns between the areas of perceived reality and subjective importance indicated that expectations were higher than perceived QoC, suggesting that patients expected somewhat higher QoC than they received.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Information on factors causing long waiting times, adapted to patients' age, sex and educational level, may reduce dissatisfaction among long waiting patients, especially among those with minor injuries.

  • 23.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Injured road users' health-related quality of life after telephone intervention: a randomised controlled trial.2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether nursing intervention via telephone follow-up can affect health-related quality of life among road users in the postinjury phase.

    Background: Injuries in the traffic environment often cause both physical impairment and psychological trauma. Therefore, it is important to investigate whether nursing via telephone follow-up after discharge could affect health-related quality of life among injured road users.

    Design: A randomised controlled study.

    Method: Between April 2003–April 2005, car occupants, cyclists and pedestrians, aged 18–70 years, all injured in the traffic environment, were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 288) or control group (n = 280). All patients were initially managed by one emergency department with the intervention group being followed up by nurse led telephone follow-up three weeks after discharge, while the control group did not receive any telephone follow-up. Data were collected from a mail survey using the non-disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument EQ5D, at baseline and after six months.

    Results: In general, the intervention group rated significantly higher health-related quality of life than the control group. This difference was most pronounced in the group of those provided with advice as part of telephone follow-up and significantly for the general health status. Car occupants gained most advantage from the nursing telephone follow-up, with significantly lower problems in the dimensions of pain/discomfort and usual activities.

    Conclusion: Nursing intervention via telephone follow-up was effective at increasing the health-related quality of life of injured road users. Early identification of the concerns of the injured and specific advice provided by the intervening nurse seems to be of greatest weight. Thus, more research is needed regarding the usefulness of early support and the advantage of this from a health economic perspective.

    Relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for changes in attitudes and working routines to identify individuals with low health-related quality of life and to give more extensive support from this point of view.

  • 24.
    Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Jansson, Lilian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    The meaning of living with dementia and disturbing behaviour as narrated by three persons admitted to a residential home.2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1397-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of our study was to illuminate the meaning of living with dementia and disturbing behaviour, as narrated by three persons admitted to a residential home. BACKGROUND: Living with dementia and so-called disturbing behaviour in an institution involves interaction with care providers and fellow residents and poses a challenge to all who are involved. METHODS: We asked the head nurses at a residential home to select persons with dementia and disturbing behaviour who were willing to be interviewed and able to communicate verbally. We performed 10 informal conversational interviews with three persons. The interviews were transcribed into text and interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Ricoeur's philosophy. RESULTS: The findings indicate that the meaning of living with dementia and disturbing behaviour, as narrated by three persons admitted to a residential home, is about being surrounded by disorder, being trapped by restriction and being set aside, as well as about being included. The findings are interpreted as a collapse of relations to self and others intertwined with occasional episodes of togetherness. This is reflected on in relation to the literature on homelessness and at-homeness and loss and maintenance of personal and social selves. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The view others have of the person with dementia and of disturbing behaviour determines the nursing care given. Taking the residents' personal history and actual context into account, disturbing behaviour may be seen as a way persons with dementia express their story and maintain their self.

  • 25.
    Hajdarevic, Senada
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sundbom, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hörnsten, Asa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Malignant melanoma: gender patterns in care seeking for suspect marks2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 17-18, p. 2676-2684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. Gender patterns in self-detection of melanoma are not sufficiently highlighted in the literature. The aim of the study was to identify specific patterns in the decision-making process to seek care for suspect melanoma, as narrated by women and men.

    Background. Females have a more favourable prognosis than males and also a higher level of perceived susceptibility and a higher level of knowledge about melanoma. Women are, furthermore, more prone to participate in screening.

    Method. Thirty patients (15 women and 15 men) with a mean age of 55.5 years and diagnosed with malignant melanoma were interviewed about their decisions to seek care for suspect skin marks. The interviews were transcribed and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results. Care-seeking behaviour for suspect melanoma was influenced by gender constructions. Men seldom or never acknowledged interest in attention to bodily changes, but when they became aware of changes, they often took a quick decision and sought an expert's assessment. Men were compliant with wives' and relatives' advice about seeking care. All women reported that they paid attention to bodily changes, but they often delayed care seeking, due to family responsibilities and emotional struggles. The women also attempted self-care remedies, such as applying ointment, before seeking professional care.

    Conclusions. There are gender-specific patterns that may influence decision making in the care-seeking process. Such patterns are important to identify, since health care professionals must take these factors into account in communicating with men and women.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses and in particular those working in telephone counselling, are often at the frontlines, deciding who can have access to health services. They are ideally placed to tackle the issue of gender constructions in the development of effective health care services.

  • 26. Hellzen, Ove
    et al.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Gilje, Fredricka
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    From optimism to pessimism. A case study of a psychiatric patient.1998In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 360-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the results of a single case study which illuminates an understanding of phases in nursing care for a patient in a psychiatric setting in Sweden. The focus of this study is a 50-year-old man who showed progressive deterioration from increased motor activity to oral, sexual, destructive and aggressive actions. Data collection using five methods occurred during a 21-month period. Results of the content analysis processes identified four distinct but non-discrete phases of the patient's complex condition. Medical and nursing care was categorized in three approaches: optimistic, strategic and resigned. The results raise the question of whether there is action that is without any meaning as an expression of the patient's wishes, thoughts and feelings. It seems clear that the patient in this study felt really angry and in despair. However, during moments of lucidity, he also indicated that he felt this was not an authentic expression of his 'real' self. His experience was that of a splintered world.

  • 27.
    Hultstrand Ahlin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Coe, Anna-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lilja, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hajdarevic, Senada
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Wishing to be perceived as a capable and resourceful person: A qualitative study of melanoma patients’ experiences of the contact and interaction with healthcare professionals2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 7–8, p. 1223-1232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore patients' experiences of contact and interaction with healthcare professionals (HCPs) during the diagnostic process of melanoma.

    BACKGROUND: In Sweden, most patients with suspected skin lesions seek care at the primary level of services in the first instance. Previous research describes the diagnostic process as a complex journey with uncertainty. Nonetheless, the importance of contact and interaction between patient and HCPs during the diagnostic process is rarely explored.

    DESIGN: This study adopted a qualitative design in which semi-structured interviews were conducted and the COREQ-checklist for qualitative studies employed (EQUATOR guidelines).

    METHODS: A sample of 30 patients (15 women, 15 men) diagnosed with melanoma was included. Secondary analysis of interviews was carried out using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: One theme emerged: Wishing to be perceived as a capable and resourceful person that consisted of three categories: (a) The need of being valued, (b) The need of being informed and (c) The need of taking actions.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that patients wish to be valued as capable and resourceful persons as well as to be provided with honest and sufficient information about the diagnosis and subsequent procedures. By fulfilling these wishes, HCPs can involve patients in the diagnostic process and reduce patients' uncertainty. A need of supportive and accessible health care to manage the diagnostic process and to reduce patients' struggle for care was also identified.

    RELEVANCE TO THE CLINICAL PRACTICE: Patients are satisfied when health care is organised in a patient-/person-centred manner, that is, in accordance with patients' needs, avoiding gatekeeping, and when HCPs interact respectfully in encounters. Accessible HCPs during the diagnostic process of melanoma are required to inform, support and navigate patients within the healthcare system and through their diagnostic journey.

  • 28.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Psychosocial maturity among people with diabetes mellitus2002In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 777-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a relationship between coping with chronic illness and a person's psychosocial development.

    The aim of this study was to describe dimensions of psychosocial development based on results of a previous factor analysis of the Modified Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory among people with type 2 diabetes.

    Interviews were carried out with 10 people with diabetes. The transcribed interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis into main categories, categories and themes.

    The categories were trust, lack of trust, positive identity, identity confusion, integrity and lack of integrity. Themes that permeated the categories in a positive way were 'activity' and 'involvement', while themes that permeated the categories in a negative way were 'passivity' and 'alienation'. Our interpretation is that the category 'trust' is the basis for 'identity', and together 'trust' and 'identity' are the basis for maturity and 'integrity'.

    A conclusion is that positive psychosocial maturity has to do with attaining trust, identity and integrity through activity and involvement. Qualities important for maturation through trust, identity and integrity are understanding, capacity, purposefulness and fortitude. Our interpretation of maturity is considered as being an important and interesting focus in nursing, while the above related qualities are closely connected to coping with diabetes.

  • 29.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Aström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Factors associated with the prevalence of violent behaviour among residents living in nursing homes2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 972-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between environmental and organisational factors as well as resident and caregiver characteristics in nursing home wards with a high respectively low prevalence of residents with violent behaviour. BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have indicated that different factors are related to violent behaviour among residents living in nursing homes, such as environmental and organisational variations, and resident and caregiver characteristics. However, few studies have simultaneously examined the relationship between these factors. DESIGN: A cross-sectional descriptive survey design. METHODS: The study was performed in 10 nursing homes consisting of 33 wards. Data were collected using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale and the Geriatric Rating Scale. Variables concerning organisation and environment were gathered by means of a questionnaire. Differences between wards with high (HPW) or low prevalence of violence (LPW) were analysed. RESULTS: In HPWs, the prevalence of behaviour and psychiatric symptoms, residents needing assistance with dressing and psychological workload were found to be higher, while job satisfaction was lower compared to LPWs. This study has also shown that caregivers in HPWs had less experience of working with older people and they experienced their working climate as less positive. Furthermore, HPWs had more residents, lower caregiver-to-resident ratio and longer corridors, and caregivers in these wards experienced more difficulties to supervise the residents. CONCLUSION: This study has shown that the prevalence of residents with violent behaviour is significantly associated with other behavioural and psychiatric symptoms and ADL (activities of daily life)-functions, as well as caregivers' experiences of job satisfaction and psychological workload. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study underlines the importance of a multifactorial approach to understand the prevalence of violent behaviour, including the physical environment, organisational factors, as well as characteristics of the resident and the caregiver.

  • 30.
    Jonsén, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Athlin, E
    Suhr, O B
    Waiting for a liver transplant: the experience of patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.2000In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liver transplant is a new treatment for familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy. The purpose of this phenomenological study is to describe the experience of waiting for a liver transplant from the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy patients' perspective. Unstructured and open-ended interviews were conducted with 14 familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy patients and the analysis of data was inspired by Colaizzi's method. Waiting was found to involve two theme categories: waiting for a decision; and waiting for the operation. Seven themes were identified: bargaining with oneself; no influence/powerlessness; relief and joy; impatience; agony; time to prepare; and need for information and support. Implications for nursing practice, such as informational and emotional support, are discussed.

  • 31. Kneck, Åsa
    et al.
    Eriksson, Lars E.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Encumbered by vulnerability and temporality: the meanings of trigger situations when learning to live with diabetes2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 19-20, p. 2874-2883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim of the study was to illuminate the meanings of trigger situations experienced in everyday life when learning to live with diabetes. Background: Adults become active learners when faced with situations they do not know how to manage, triggering a need to understand something in a different way than before. Knowing more about experiential learning for persons living with diabetes is important for understanding how learning can be supported by health care. Design: A life-world approach with a phenomenological hermeneutical method, inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. Methods: This method was used for interpreting transcriptions of interviews and consists of three stages: naive understanding, structural analysis and a comprehensive understanding. Participants (n = 13), with either type I or type II diabetes, were interviewed on three different occasions over a three-year period after being diagnosed with diabetes. Results: When learning to live with diabetes, the meanings of trigger situations were described as 'the unpredictable body heightens insecurity with awareness of one's own dependability', 'losing control in unsustainable situations' and 'encumbered by vulnerability and temporality in earlier familiar situations'. Conclusion: The meanings of trigger situations were to lose the smooth, unreflected way of managing an everyday life situation, interlaced with feelings of lost control of how to live with new insights of being vulnerable. Trigger situations meant an opportunity for learning, as well as being demanding, unplanned and with limited freedom of choice. Trigger situations presented life and body as unpredictable.

  • 32. Lier, Haldis Økland
    et al.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Nursing Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan,Sweden.
    Rørtveit, Kristine
    Patients' daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery: a qualitative study2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 322-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore and describe patients' daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery markedly decreases body weight. Previous studies describe positive consequences, as well as physical, social and emotional challenges during the first few years after surgery. An understanding of how patients adjust to and cope with postsurgical changes in the long term is crucial to help them obtain a successful outcome after bariatric surgery.

    METHOD: A qualitative method was employed. In-depth interviews with 10 men and women were conducted five years after bariatric surgery in a Norwegian hospital.

    RESULTS: One overarching theme - a multitude of daily life changes following bariatric surgery - was developed based on three main themes: relational aspects related to weight loss, the new body and changes in self-esteem. Six sub-themes are described.

    CONCLUSION: Those who undergo gastric bypass surgery experience enormous changes in their daily lives. Their social lives, their relationship to their body and their self-esteem may be altered by the weight loss.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results of this study suggest directions for patient education, health staff education and peer education. A patient education programme focusing on changes in daily life experiences when undergoing gastric bypass surgery is suggested due to the changes experienced by the patients involved in this study.

  • 33.
    Lundman, Berit
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Jansson, Leila
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    The meaning of living with a long-term disease. To revalue and be revalued.2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 7B, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the meaning of living with a long-term disease. Design. The study had an interpretive, descriptive design.

    METHOD: Eight persons aged between 55-79 years with different diagnoses were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method.

    FINDINGS: The findings are presented in five themes and eleven subthemes. The theme 'Loss and uncertainty threaten everyday order' deals with the difficulties to sustain the goals and the ingrained order of daily living. The theme 'Learning one's capacity and living accordingly' concerns perceptions of the values of the outside world related to what is seen as normal, worthy or right. The theme 'Maintaining fellowship and belonging' sheds light on specific values in human interaction. The theme 'Having a source of strength' describes the need for confirmation and support when being put aside and suffering as a consequence. The theme 'Building anew' means that people with long-term diseases have the ability to live life in accordance with their own wishes, goals and values.

    CONCLUSIONS: The interpretation of the text as a whole was that in the participants, long-term disease brought about a revaluation of the self and of prevailing values, and a sense of being revalued by the world.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study may help to gain a deeper insight into the complexity of living life with a long-term disease, and to the process of integrate the demands of the disease into daily life.

  • 34. Lundmark, mikael
    Attitudes to spiritual care among nursing staff in a Swedish oncology clinic2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 863-874Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lundmark, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Religious Studies.
    Attitudes to spiritual care among nursing staff in a Swedish oncology clinic2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 863-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To identify factors which may influence attitudes to spiritual care, test the relevance of these identified influencing factors in a Swedish nursing context, and replicate a part of a previous study by Strang et al. ( Journal of Clinical Nursing 2002; 11:48-57) dealing with attitudes to spiritual care in a holistic perspective. A questionnaire was handed out to all nursing staff at a Swedish oncology clinic ( n = 93) excluding the radiation therapy ward. Data were obtained from 68 nurses or nursing auxiliaries.

    Design and methods: (i) Literature review of international research reports concerning spiritual care in a nursing context. (ii) Construction of a questionnaire comprising 17 questions with given alternatives based on the previous literature study. (iii) Operationalization of the concept 'attitudes to spiritual care' into some more easily measurable questions through identification in earlier research reports of conceivable indicators of attitudes to spiritual care. (iv) Construction of a suggestion for a definition of the concept 'spiritual care' from the results of Strang et al. (2002) to be used in the questionnaire. (v) Statistical analysis of the data from the questionnaire and a comparison with previous studies.

    Results and conclusions: The replicating part of the study are mainly in accordance with Strang et al. (2002) and lead to the conclusions that holistic care (i) is desirable, (ii) should include spiritual needs of the patients and (iii) is not yet realized in Swedish health care. The identified influencing factors are relevant in a Swedish nursing context. The factors influencing the largest number of indicators of attitudes to spiritual care are 'non-organized religiousness' and 'degree of comfort while providing spiritual care'. Other influencing factors are:'belief in God', 'belief in life after death', 'organized religiousness', 'profession', and 'the perceived degree of education in spiritual care'. Relevance to clinical practice.Knowledge of attitudes towards spiritual care among nursing staff and factors influencing these attitudes will improve the possibilities of meeting the spiritual needs of patients.

  • 36.
    Lämås, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Graneheim, Ulla H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Jacobsson, Catrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Experiences of abdominal massage for constipation2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 5-6, p. 757-765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aims to illuminate participants experiences of receiving abdominal massage for constipation. Background. Abdominal massage has been found to decrease the severity of constipation and abdominal pain, but little is known about how patients experience receiving abdominal massage. Design. The present study is a qualitative descriptive study, based on individual interviews. Method. Nine adults receiving abdominal massage for constipation were invited to participate. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in Sweden between 2005-2007. The interviews were transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results. Four themes were formulated: 'being on one's guard', 'becoming embraced by safe hands', 'being touched physically and emotionally' and 'feeling vulnerable'. The participants reported that they were on guard, i. e. they were sceptical about whether or not abdominal massage was effective and suitable. However, as the massage sessions continued, they found the massage pleasant and began to feel embraced and in safe hands. They described how the abdominal massage made them feel as 'being touched physically and emotionally' and their bowel habits were improved. Along with the improvements, their agony was gone and they felt relieved. However, they considered their new condition fragile and they felt vulnerable to relapse. Conclusions. Abdominal massage was experienced as pleasurable, and after treatment, the participants felt more comfortable with their bowel function. Participants described abdominal massage as affecting the whole person. Relevance to clinical practice. Abdominal massage has been shown to be an effective intervention for constipation. A crucial aspect is that nurses need to be sensitive and respect the intimacy associated with the abdomen.

  • 37.
    Nilsson, Anita
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Rushton, Carole
    Nurses’ descriptions of person‐centred care for older people in an acute medical ward—On the individual, team and organisational levels’2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 7–8, p. 1251-1259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To describe nurses' experiences of providing person-centred care for older people on an acute medical ward.

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that person-centred care for older people contributes to a higher quality care and increased satisfaction with care. However, there is a shortness of studies providing concrete examples of what facilitates nurses providing person-centred care for older people in acute care.

    DESIGN: An interview study with qualitative content analysis. COREQ guidelines have been applied.

    METHOD: Fourteen registered nurses and enrolled nurses from an acute care ward participated in semi structured research interviews. The interviews were conducted during 2016 and interpreted using qualitative content analyses.

    RESULTS: Person-centred care was described at different levels in care; at the individual nurse level, person-centred care was described as involving person-centred assessing, relating and spacing which involved personalising assessments, relationships as well as the physical environment. At the team level, person-centred care was described in terms of person-centred goal setting, team responsibilities and team support, and involved having shared and personalised goals, different team responsibilities and a climate of support and collaboration. At the organisational level, person-centred care was described in terms of having person-centred routines, workloads and staff roles that all contributed to put the person at the core of the organisation and build routines to support this.

    CONCLUSIONS: The current study emphasises that, rather than confining person-centred care to specific moments or relationships, a systematic, multilevel organisational approach seems needed to enable nurses as individuals and teams to provide person-centred care consistently and continuously to older people in acute care settings.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results of this study should inspire nurses and managers to expedite implementation of person-centred care for older care recipients hospitalised in acute care wards. Examples of person-centred care are presented herein at clearly identified sites, namely, the "individual," "team" and "organisational levels."

  • 38.
    Nilsson, Anita
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Rasmussen, Birgit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery La Trobe University Melbourne Vic. Australia.
    Falling behind: a substantive theory of care for older people with cognitive impairment in acute settings2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, p. 1682-1691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To develop a theoretical understanding of the processes hindering person-centred care of older people with cognitive impairment in acute care settings.

    BACKGROUND: Although person-centred care with its holistic focus on the biopsychosocial needs of patients is commonly considered the gold standard care for older people with cognitive impairment, the extent to which care is person-centred can increase in acute care settings generally.

    DESIGN: Grounded theory inspired by Strauss and Corbin.

    METHOD: The study used a grounded theory approach to generate and analyse data from a Swedish sample of acute care staff, patients and family members.

    RESULTS: The substantive theory postulates that staff risks 'falling behind' in meeting the needs of older patients with cognitive impairment if working without consensus about the care of these patients, if the organisation is disease-oriented and efficiency-driven, and if the environment is busy and inflexible. This facilitated 'falling behind' in relation to meeting the multifaceted needs of older patients with cognitive impairment and contributed to patient suffering, family exclusion and staff frustration.

    CONCLUSIONS: The theory highlights aspects of importance in the provision of person-centred care of older people with cognitive impairment in acute settings and suggests areas to consider in the development of caring environments in which the place, pace and space can meet the needs of the older person.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The proposed substantive theory can be used to critically examine current ward practices and routines, and the extent to which these support or inhibit high-quality person-centred care for older patients with known or unknown cognitive impairments.

  • 39.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    School of Health, Örebro University.
    Soothing music can increase oxytocin levels during bed rest after open-heart surgery: a randomized control trial2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 15, p. 2153-2161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To evaluate the effect of bed rest with music on relaxation for patients who have undergone heart surgery on postoperative day one.

    Background. Music intervention has been evaluated as an appropriate nursing intervention to reduce patients ‘pain, stress and anxiety levels in several clinical settings, but its effectiveness in increasing patients’ subjective and objective relaxation levels has not been examined.

    Design. A randomised controlled trial.

    Method. Forty patients undergoing open coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement surgery were randomly allocated to either music listening during bed rest (n = 20) or bed rest only (n = 20). Relaxation was assessed during bed rest the day after surgery by determining the plasma oxytocin, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, PaO2, SaO2 and subjective relaxation levels.

    Results. In the music group, levels of oxytocin increased significantly in contrast to the control group for which the trend over time was negative i.e., decreasing values. Subjective relaxation levels increased significantly more and there were also a significant higher levels of PaO2 in the music group compared to the control group. There was no difference in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and SaO2 between the groups.

    Conclusion. Listening to music during bed rest after open-heart surgery has some effects on the relaxation system as regards s-oxytocin and subjective relaxations levels. This effect seems to have a causal relation from the psychological (music makes patients relaxed) to the physical (oxytocin release).

    Relevance to clinical practice. Music intervention should be offered as an integral part of the multimodal regime administered to the patients that have undergone cardiovascular surgery. It is a supportive source that increases relaxation.

  • 40.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiolgy and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital & School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University and Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University & Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Pain assessments in day surgery patients2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 19/20, p. 2942-2943Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Nordin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Andersson, Linus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Coping strategies, social support and responsibility in chemical intolerance2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 15/16, p. 2162-2173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To study coping strategies, social support and responsibility for improvement in chemical intolerance (CI).

    Background. Limited knowledge of CI among health professionals and lay persons places demands on the chemically intolerant individual’s coping strategies and perception of social support and ability to take responsibility for improvement. However, there is sparse literature on these issues in CI.

    Design. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, quasi-experimental study.

    Method. Fifty-nine persons with mild, 92 with moderate and 31 with severe CI participated by rating (i) usage and effectiveness of six problem- and six emotion-focused coping strategies, (ii) emotional, instrumental and informative support provided by various sources and (iii) society’s and the inflicted individual’s responsibility for improvement.

    Results. The participants reported that the most commonly used and effective coping strategies were avoiding odorous/pungent environments and asking persons to limit their use of odorous/pungent substances (problem-focused strategies) as well as accepting the situation and reprioritising (emotion-focused strategies). High intolerance severity was associated with problemfocused coping strategies and relatively low intolerance with emotion-focused strategies. More emotional than instrumental and informative support was perceived, predominantly from the partner and other family members. Responsibility attributed to society was also found to increase from mild to moderate/severe intolerance.

    Conclusions. Certain coping strategies are more commonly used and perceived as more effective than others in CI. However, intolerance severity plays a role regarding both coping strategies and responsibility. Emotional support appears to be the most available type of support.

  • 42.
    Nystedt, Astrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Willman, Ania
    To Mander R (2004) commentary on Nystedt et al. (2004)2005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 911-911Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Nystedt, Astrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    The negative birth experience of prolonged labour: a case-referent study.2005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 579-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study aimed to analyse and describe women's different perceptions and experiences of childbirth following prolonged or normal labour. BACKGROUND: In clinical practice prolonged labour, or dystocia, is a common delivery complication often causing a negative birth experience. METHOD: Women giving singleton live birth to their first child with spontaneous labour after more than 37 completed weeks' pregnancy at three hospitals in northern Sweden were recruited to a case-referent study. Cases (n = 84) were women following a prolonged labour with assisted vaginal or abdominal delivery, and referents (n = 171) delivered following a normal labour. Participants completed a questionnaire that investigated childbirth experiences, previous family relationships and childhood experiences. RESULTS: Women with prolonged labour had a negative childbirth experience more often (34%) than did women who had a normal labour (4%) (P < 0.05). Cases agreed significantly more than the referents with the statement, 'Pain relief during the delivery saved me' (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.9-11.1) and 'My difficulties during the delivery will mark me for life' (OR 12.4, 95% CI: 4.4-35.9). There were no differences between the cases and referents regarding perceived experience of professional or social support. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: To improve care, midwives and doctors can alleviate pain and relieve the negativity and difficulty associated with the experience of prolonged labour from the perspective of the woman giving birth.

  • 44. Ohlsson-Nevo, Emma
    et al.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Life is back to normal and yet not: partners' and patient's experiences of life of the first year after colorectal cancer surgery2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 3-4, p. 555-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To describe the experience of life the first year after surgery from the perspective of persons treated for colorectal cancer and their partners.

    Background. Colorectal cancer is a common cancer form, and treatment can cause unpleasant side effects such as sexual dysfunction and bowel problems. Partners struggle to keep family life normal and provide support. Little is known about couples' experiences a year after treatment for colorectal cancer.

    Design. Qualitative descriptive.

    Methods. Individual semi-structured interviews with 13 persons treated for colorectal cancer and their partners, a total of 26 participants.

    Results. One theme was identified in the study; 'Life is back to normal and yet not:' participants described living a normal but different life than before. Three subthemes were identified; 'Life has a shadow of death', 'The treated body sets the rules' and 'To share or not share the illness'.

    Conclusions. Findings showed that both the patients' and their partners' lives were influenced by uncertainty and the condition of the patient. Attitudes varied towards sharing the illness. It was found that information needs varied both within and between couples. A future challenge to healthcare personnel is the obligation to meet the needs of both patients and their partners on the illness trajectory and recovery after treatment for colorectal cancer.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Findings enhance the understanding of the impact of colorectal cancer on both patients and partners. Healthcare personnel need to assess both the patient's and partner's need for information, support and assistance. Support groups could be an effective tool for providing information, communication and support. Future studies are needed to evaluate such groups.

  • 45.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Malnutrition in hip fracture patients: an intervention study.2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2027-2038Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Ottosson, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    The experience of food, eating and meals following radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 7-8, p. 1034-1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe the experience of food, eating and meals following radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Background. Eating problems are common in patients with head and neck cancer and may remain for a long period of time after treatment.

    Design. A qualitative study design using in-depth semi-structured interviews.

    Methods. Interviews were conducted nine months after the termination of radiotherapy. A purposive sample of thirteen patients with head and neck cancer participated in the study. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.

    Results. The experience of food, eating and meals up to nine months after radiotherapy was captured in six categories: ‘Along journey – taking small steps to an uncertain future’, ‘A new way of eating’, ‘Eating without satisfaction’, ‘Challenging meals outside the family’, ‘Support and information – the key to a successful journey’ and ‘The creation and acceptance of a new normal’.

    Conclusion. This study provides new information on the long-term aspects of food, eating and meals in patients with head and neck cancer. Head and neck cancer signifies a long journey with problems affecting physical, psychological and social aspects of food. Information and support and the use of strategies are important for patients with head and neck cancer to adapt to new possibilities for living after cancer treatment. Relevance to clinical practice. All members of the multiprofessional team need to be aware of the struggles with food and eating experienced by patients with head and neck cancer during the convalescent period. It is therefore important that the follow-up focuses on all aspects of food, eating and meals as a part of a holistic approach.

  • 47. Ozanne, Anneli O.
    et al.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Strang, Susann
    Finding meaning despite anxiety over life and death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 15-16, p. 2141-2149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives To illuminate how people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) create meaning despite the disease. Background Coping strategies for living with ALS have already been investigated. However, there is a lack of studies on how people with the disease find meaning and what helps and hinders this. Design A qualitative descriptive study. Methods Fourteen individual interviews were performed in Spring 2007. The interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Results Two themes emerged to illuminate the complex life situation of the interviewees: experiences of anxiety over life and death and finding meaning despite the illness. It became clear that the uncertain journey towards death was more frightened than death itself. Despite the incurable disease, which brought feelings of life and death anxiety, physical loss, unfairness, guilt, shame and existential loneliness, they also found meaning in life, which strengthened their will to live. Meaning was found through their family and friends, the act of giving and receiving help, the feeling of having a life of their own and accepting the present. The perspective of life was transferred to a deeper view where material things and quarrels were no longer in focus. Conclusions Despite the disease, the participants found meaning in life which strengthened their will to live. Relevance to clinical practiceThe balance between anxiety over life and death and finding meaning in life indicates the importance of support through the whole disease process. Both disease-specific problems and existential questions must be tackled. Nurses and other professionals need to be aware of the patients' existential qualms. There is a need to focus on what is important for the individual, and emphasis must be placed on where that person can find meaning.

  • 48. Ozanne, Anneli Olsson
    et al.
    Graneheim, Ulla H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Persson, Lennart
    Strang, Susann
    Factors that facilitate and hinder the manageability of living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in both patients and next of kin2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 9-10, p. 1364-1373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives. This study aims to illuminate factors that facilitate and hinder the manageability of living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in patients and next of kin. Fourteen patients and 13 next of kin were interviewed. Background. The whole family becomes affected when a person gets the disease. Therefore, it is important to identify strategies for managing the life situation among both patients and their next of kin. Design. A qualitative descriptive study. Method. This study based on individual interviews was performed in spring 2007. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results. The results indicate constant fluctuation between opportunities and limitations in individual ability - of patients and family members - to manage the life situation. Both patients and next of kin devised strategies to manage their situations through acceptance, living in the present and perceiving real presence and support from family, friends and authorities. Dysfunctional relationships with family members, friends, or authorities reduced the manageability of the situation. Furthermore, patients experienced difficulties managing their situations when forced into passivity and increased dependence. Next of kin experienced decreased ability to manage because of burden, lack of own time and feelings of being controlled. Conclusion. The fluctuations in manageability and the similarities and differences between the pairs, indicate the importance of support, both for the individual and the family. Relevance to clinical practice. Fluctuations in manageability and similarities and differences between approaches to managing the situation suggest a need for input from caregivers, for the whole family. Family members need support and time for their own needs and also the opportunity to increase their awareness and understanding of the needs of other family members. This study may give health personnel insight into how to help families devise strategies to manage a complex life situation.

  • 49. Pascoe, Elizabeth C.
    et al.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Which coping strategies can predict beneficial feelings associated with prostate cancer?2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 17-18, p. 2569-2578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: This study aimed to identify the extent to which different coping strategies can predict benefit finding in prostate cancer experiences. Background. Although beginning evidence suggests that the capacity to find positives in adversity and find some benefit from cancer-associated experiences may be influenced by coping, little is known about which coping strategies can predict benefit finding in prostate cancer. Design: Cross-sectional. Method: Data from men (n = 209) diagnosed with prostate cancer receiving hormone suppression therapy were analysed using descriptive statistics, bivariate correlations and backward stepwise multiple linear regression. Sociodemographic and clinical data, and self-report scales (17-item Benefit Finding Scale and Brief COPE) were used. Results: Bivariate analyses showed significant correlations between 14 coping strategies and benefit finding in prostate cancer. Multiple linear regression modelling showed that the predictor variables 'acceptance', 'positive reframing' and 'turning to religion' explained 35% of the variance in dependant variable benefit finding when the other variables were controlled for. Of the three predictor variables, acceptance and positive reinterpretation were most strongly related to benefit finding. Conclusion: The self-reported coping strategies 'acceptance' and 'positive reframing' emerged as being most significantly predictive of benefit finding in this sample. 'Turning to religion' was also significant, but to a somewhat lesser extent in predicting benefit finding in the disruptive experience of prostate cancer. Relevance to clinical practice: The use of positively oriented emotional coping strategies of 'acceptance', 'positive reframing' and 'turning to religion' are influential to benefit finding in prostate cancer. An understanding of the coping strategies that are predictive to benefit finding can assist clinicians to discern and target men who are more or less likely to find benefit, and to develop person-centred support strategies and interventions with an aim to optimising positive emotional states throughout the cancer journey.

  • 50.
    Pusa, Susanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Dorell, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Erlingsson, Christen
    Antonsson, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sundin, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nurses' perceptions about a web-based learning intervention concerning supportive family conversations in home health care2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 7–8, p. 1314-1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the perceptions that municipal primary healthcare nurses and municipal registered nurses had about a web-based learning intervention concerning supportive family health conversations in municipal home health care.

    BACKGROUND: Even though family health conversations are well grounded in theory with several reported benefits for patients and families, most working nurses have little or no training in practising family systems nursing including family health conversations. Continued learning is necessary for nurses, where web-based learning may be one answer of updating the professional skills and knowledge of nurses regarding supporting families.

    DESIGN: The study used a descriptive design and followed the "Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research" (COREQ) checklist.

    METHODS: Twenty-one nurses participated in an educational intervention that consisted of web-based learning and two face-to-face seminars about family systems nursing including family health conversations. The nurses were interviewed after completion, and the audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The findings consist of nurses' perceptions regarding the disposition of instruction, the prerequisites for learning and a changed approach when working with families. The findings are further reflected on through Illeris' theory concerning learning triangle.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings are encouraging for educating nurses in family health conversations at their workplace, with the purpose of supporting patients and families. However, it is important to be aware of the different dimensions of learning, in addition to the appraisal of social aspects and organisational circumstances when educating nurses as they influence the utilisation of the knowledge.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This web-based learning intervention seems to be suitable for educating nurses in family health conversations and could be an appropriate step towards implementing these conversations in home health care with the purpose of supporting families.

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