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  • 1.
    Bergström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lindh, Viveca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Developing the role of Swedish advanced practice nurse (APN) through a blended learning master's program: consequences of knowledge organisation2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 28, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a research study conducted with a group of nurses in Sweden enrolled in a newly developed blended learning master's programme to become advanced practice nurses (APNs). As background, the paper presents the regional needs the programme is intended to address and describes how the programme was designed. The aim was to understand how, from students' perspective, the nurse master's programme structured knowledge for their future position as APNs. The research question focuses on how the master's programme prepares students by meeting their diverse needs for knowledge. Empirical material was collected at two times during the students' first and second years of study through semi-structured qualitative interviews. The findings highlight the process in which these master's students gained a more advanced identity of becoming APNs. This process demonstrates how students perceive their current position as nurses based on a discourse of knowledge in relation to the practical and theoretical knowledge they encounter in the master's programme. This article concludes by recommending that attention should be paid to developing APN role models in the current Swedish healthcare system.

  • 2. Melender, Hanna-Leena
    et al.
    Jonsén, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hilli, Yvonne
    Quality of clinical education: comparison of experiences of undergraduate student nurses in Finland and Sweden2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 13, no 4/S1, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to compare the experiences of three groups of undergraduate student nurses on the quality of clinical education over time. The study is part of a longitudinal research and development project in Finland and Sweden. The sample (n = 109) consisted of three subgroups of student nurses: the first in a Swedish faculty (SWE) (n = 53), the second in a Finnish faculty (FIN1, n = 42), and the third in another Finnish faculty (FIN2, n = 14). In the comparison of the subgroups, FIN1 and FIN2 were put together, because of the small sample size. The first data was collected in 2009 after the students' first clinical education period in acute and elderly care. The second data was collected in 2010 after the students' second clinical education period on different wards in central hospitals, in primary care units and in elderly care. The data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire and analysed using statistical methods. On the basis of an explorative factor analysis conducted on the first data four sum variables were produced, named as follows: Clinical Preception, Learning in Clinical Education, Learning Objectives in Clinical Education, and Reflection in Clinical Education. In the comparison of the years 2009 and 2010 (n = 109), the factors Clinical Preception and Learning Objectives in Clinical Education had lower evaluations in year 2010 than in year 2009. In year 2009 Swedish students (n = 53) evaluated Clinical Preception and Learning in Clinical Education lower than Finnish students (n = 56). In year 2010 Finnish students evaluated Clinical Preception lower than Swedish students. It is evident that the clinical education practices should be developed in cooperation with the faculties and the staff of the clinical education placements.

  • 3.
    Nilsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Juthberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Factors associated with nursing students' adherence to venous blood collection practice guidelines: A cross sectional study2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 23, p. 92-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venous blood specimen collection is a common procedure that nursing students perform during pre-registration courses, and training for such collections takes place on campus as well as at clinical placements. However, levels of adherence to practice guidelines are still suboptimal among both nursing students and healthcare staff. We aimed to explore nursing students' adherence to the Swedish national venous blood specimen collection practice guidelines regarding patient identification and test request management and how this adherence is related to clinical experience, capability beliefs, research use,and the perceived social climate in clinical contexts. A survey with a cross-sectional design was conducted among 305 nursing students at a medium sized university in Sweden. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The survey showed that 82% of the students adhered to patient identification guideline practices and 80% to test request management practices. Factors associated with correct patient identification procedures were semester and frequency of research use.Factors associated with correct test request management were previous healthcare work experience,semester, and capability beliefs regarding academic abilities and evidence-based practice. We conclude that there is a need to develop educational tools to train students in research use and evidence-based practice in order to enhance guideline practice adherence and improve patient safety.

  • 4.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Blekinge tekniska högskola, Malmö högskola.
    Including systematic reviews in PhD programmes and candidatures in nursing: 'Hobson's choice'?2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 102-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, gathering and synthesising evidence, i.e. conducting systematic reviews, is considered an important part of any health service research endeavour. Reviewing the literature, however suggest that it is not yet common that PhD students/doctoral candidates publish systematic reviews or even include a high quality review of the literature as a part of their PhD programme or candidature. Implying that systematic reviewing skills might not be acquired by going through an education on a postgraduate level. Additionally, scholars debating systematic reviews ‘to be or not to be’ as a part of research training seem to be sparse, especially within the field of nursing. In this issue for debate, we would like to propose that the absence of systematic reviews' in this context might severely hamper the ‘up and coming’ researchers as well as the research conducted. We envisage that this lack can have a negative impact on international nursing practice, and therefore propose that systematic reviews should be considered, whenever appropriate, as a mandatory part of any PhD programme or candidature. We believe that abilities in systematic reviewing will be a sought after research skills in the near future. Including systematic reviews would promote i) refined, well-grounded adequate research questions, ii) PhDs with broad and elevated methodological skills, iii) an increased level of evidence based nursing praxis. However, to make this a reality, supervisors, PhD students, and candidates would need to understand the value of this kind of research activity. Finally, lobbying University faculty boards and grant providers that are not inclined to view literature reviews as ‘proper’ research or as an important part of health service research, needs to be put on the agenda.

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