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  • 1.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Impact of a critical care postgraduate certificate course on nurses' self-reported competence and confidence: A quasi-experimental study2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 65, p. 156-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postgraduate education is said to support the development of nurses' professional competence and confidence, essential to the delivery of safe and effective care. However, there is a shortness of empirical evidence to demonstrate an increase to nurses' self-reported confidence and competence on completion of critical care postgraduate certificate-level education.

    Objectives: To explore the impact of a critical care postgraduate certificate course on nurses' self-reported competence and confidence. To explore the psychometric properties and performance of the Critical Care Competence and Confidence Questionnaire.

    Design: A quasi-experimental pre/post-test design.

    Participants: A total population sample of nurses completing a critical care postgraduate certificate course at an Australian University.

    Methods: The Critical Care Competence and Confidence Questionnaire was developed for this study to measure nurses' self-reported competence and confidence at baseline and follow up. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to explore sample characteristics and changes between baseline and follow-up. Reliability of the questionnaire was explored using Cronbach's Alpha and item-total correlations.

    Results: There was a statistically significant increase in competence and confidence between baseline and follow-up across all questionnaire domains. Satisfactory reliability estimates were found for the questionnaire.

    Conclusions: Completion of a critical care postgraduate certificate course significantly increased nurses' perceived competence and confidence. The Critical Care Competence and Confidence Questionnaire was found to be psychometrically sound for measuring nurses' self-reported competence and confidence.

  • 2.
    Dahlqvist, Vera
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. The Vardal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Dealing with stress: Patterns of self-comfort among healthcare students2008In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 476-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress among healthcare students is a growing problem. As self-comfort is assumed to be a way of coping with stressful emotions, the aim of this study was to describe the patterns of self-comforting actions that healthcare students usually use in distress. One hundred and sixty-eight healthcare students volunteered to write down accounts of what they do when they comfort themselves. Their accounts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings reveal two themes: Ingressing and Transcending. Ingressing comprises the sub-themes Unloading, Distracting, Nurturing oneself, Withdrawing and Reassuring. Transcending comprises the sub-themes Opening up and Finding new perspectives. These findings are in line with some stress-reducing strategies described in the literature on stress management. Winnicott’s theory about the phenomenon of transition is used to interpret the findings. In the light of Winnicott’s theory, self-comforting measures can be comprehended as the ability to transfer early childhood experiences of being nurtured and comforted into well-adapted strategies to effect relaxation and gain strength.

  • 3. Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    "Learning by doing": or how to reach an understanding of the research method phenomenological hermeneutics2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 735-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One problem addressed in teaching graduate students qualitative research methods is practising the cognitive and conative skills that students need to generate both rich data and meaningful analysis. The aim of the study was to illuminate development in a group of pre-doctoral and doctoral students as they learnt the phenomenological hermeneutics research method. In a course comprising 18 doctoral students we used the "guided path" pedagogical approach and decided to use a subject of which everyone has lived experience, "troubled conscience", for the phenomenological hermeneutic analysis conducted with the students. As the students progressed in their learning experience of the research method, they analysed their data according to the steps in the method, and we as teachers conducted separate analyses of the same data. The results point in the same direction as previous studies in the field. This is discussed in terms of strength of the pedagogical approach and the students' learning, since despite the fact that their data are limited and not very detailed they were able to come up with results that were in line with previous research.

  • 4.
    Graneheim, Ulla H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundman, Bent
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Methodological challenges in qualitative content analysis: A discussion paper2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 56, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion paper is aimed to map content analysis in the qualitative paradigm and explore common methodological challenges. We discuss phenomenological descriptions of manifest content and hermeneutical interpretations of latent content. We demonstrate inductive, deductive, and abductive approaches to qualitative content analysis, and elaborate on the level of abstraction and degree of interpretation used in constructing categories, descriptive themes, and themes of meaning. With increased abstraction and interpretation comes an increased challenge to demonstrate the credibility and authenticity of the analysis. A key issue is to show the logic in how categories and themes are abstracted, interpreted, and connected to the aim and to each other. Qualitative content analysis is an autonomous method and can be used at varying levels of abstraction and interpretation.

  • 5.
    Hilli, Yvonne
    et al.
    Novia University of Applied Sciences, Vaasa, Finland; Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Melender, Hanna-Leena
    VAMK, University of Applied Sciences, Vaasa, Finland.
    Salmu, Marita
    VAMK, University of Applied Sciences, Vaasa, Finland.
    Jonsen, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Being a preceptor: A Nordic qualitative study2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 1420-1424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Positive preceptor experiences enhance learning and even affect the decisions of students to remain in nursing. In light of this, nurse managers have a responsibility, besides maintaining staff competence, to assess whether preceptors live up to their professional obligations. Aim: The aim of this Nordic qualitative study was to gain a deeper understanding of the perceived experiences of preceptorship used to support undergraduate student nurses during their clinical education. Method: Data was collected through narrative interviews with 31 preceptors in Finland and Sweden before being analysed using a hermeneutical approach. Findings: Preceptorship is all about teaching in a supportive environment with ethical dimensions uniting theory and praxis. A caring relationship is essential and the basis for student learning and development. Conclusion: The preceptors emphasise a caring relationship as the foundation for student learning. Moreover, preceptorship is an ethical issue, a responsibility that should be recognised by all stakeholders. The findings suggest that preceptorship should be examined from a new perspective. The ethical dimension must be recognised and linked to the further education of preceptors. Nurse managers are in a key position to lead for change. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Jonsén, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Melender, Hanna-Leena
    Department of Social and Health Care, VAMK, University of Applied Sciences, Vaasa, Finland.
    Hilli, Yvonne
    Department of Social and Health Care, Novia University of Applied Sciences, Vaasa, Finland.
    Finnish and Swedish nursing students' experiences of their first clinical practice placement: a qualitative study2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 297-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nursing is a practice-based discipline. Clinical practice settings are important in preparing undergraduate nursing students for the role of registered nurse. AIM: The aim of this Nordic qualitative study is to illuminate first year undergraduate nursing students' experiences of clinical practice during their first clinical placement, with a focus on preception, reflection, and the link between theory and practice. METHOD: Data were collected by focus group interviews with 22 nursing students, and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. FINDINGS: Positive experiences included stimulating and visible preceptors, a permissive atmosphere, and reflection as a matter of course. Negative experiences were related to feelings of abandonment and powerlessness when preceptors were invisible and the atmosphere at the ward was non-permissive. The implementation of research-based knowledge was insufficient. CONCLUSIONS: A permissive atmosphere and visible preceptors are crucial if learning is to be maximized. Consequently, it is important to set aside time for preceptors to be more visible and to make the atmosphere at the clinical placement more permissive. The student must have the opportunity to combine scientific knowledge with evidence-based knowledge in order to develop nursing actions.

  • 7.
    Lindgren, Barbro
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Nurse lecturers' perceptions of what baccalaureate nursing students could gain from clinical group supervision.2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 360-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extensive amount of studies on clinical supervision during the nursing students' clinical programmes has shown that supervision most often is given on a one-to-one basis, and that many challenges are embedded in this kind of supervision. In some studies group supervision has been used, with mostly successful effects according to the nursing students. At a university in Sweden, a model of group supervision was included in the baccalaureate nursing programme, conducted by nurse lecturers. The purpose of this study was to describe the value of clinical group supervision to nursing students, as perceived by the nurse lecturers. Data consisted of field notes written by the nurse lecturers after 60 supervision sessions, and qualitative content analysis was performed. The findings showed how reflection in a group of equals was considered to give the nursing students opportunities to increase their understanding of themselves and others, prepare them for coming events, increase their personal and professional strengths, and inspire them for further development. On the basis of the findings and previous studies the value of using nurse lecturers as group supervisors was discussed. The impact of a contract to achieve a good learning environment in group supervision was also stressed.

  • 8. Maquibar, Amaia
    et al.
    Estalella, Itziar
    Vives-Cases, Carmen
    Hurtig, Anna-Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Analysing training in gender-based violence for undergraduate nursing students in Spain: A mixed-methods study2019In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 77, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health-care professionals, and nurses especially among them, play an essential role in the health sector's response to gender-based violence. To be able to successfully address this major public health issue they need specific training in the topic.

    Objective: To analyse training on gender-based violence that nursing students receive at universities in Spain.

    Design: Mixed-methods approach.

    Setting: Spain.

    Methods: Systematic review of public documents followed by in-depth interviews with university lecturers.

    Results: Eighty per cent (92/115) of nursing training programmes included content regarding gender-based violence. There was great variability in the topics included in the training. Health consequences due to gender based violence exposure and the role of the health sector in addressing these health consequences were the most frequently included topics. Ethical issues and legislation were the least frequent ones, as these were only dealt with in one and 18 training programmes, respectively. In the qualitative analysis of the interviews, two categories were identified: 'Supportive legislation and supportive lecturers are essential for integrating gender-based violence training' and 'Approach to gender-based violence shapes the contents and the subject in which it is incorporated'. The first category refers to the main drivers for training integration, while the second category refers to how lecturers' perceptions influenced the way in which training was implemented.

    Conclusions: As many as 80% of the nursing education programmes included specific training in gender-based violence, although with great variability in the contents among the universities. For this study's participants, enacted legislation, and lecturers interested in the topic and in decision-making positions were key drivers for this extensive implementation. The variability observed across universities might be explained by lecturers' different approaches to gender-based violence and the nursing profession.

  • 9.
    Maquibar, Amaia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hurtig, Anna-Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Vives-Cases, Carmen
    Estalella, Itziar
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nursing students' discourses on gender-based violence and their training for a comprehensive healthcare response: A qualitative study.2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 68, p. 208-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Gender-based violence is a worldwide major public health issue with detrimental effects on the health of women. Nurses can play an essential role in its identification, management and prevention. Specific training is essential to be able to successfully address gender-based violence and accordingly, has been incorporated into many university's training programmes for nurses and other health care professionals. Research aimed at exploring attitudes and perceptions of gender-based violence in undergraduate student nurses following these new training programmes is scarce.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this qualitative study was to explore third- and fourth-year nursing students' perceptions and attitudes toward gender-based violence.

    DESIGN: A focus groups based qualitative study.

    SETTING: A public University in Spain.

    PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sample of 42 nursing students who joined 7 focus groups.

    METHODS: Focus groups discussions following a semi-structured interview guide. Discussions were transcribed and analysed following critical discourse analysis to identify interpretative repertoires.

    RESULTS: From the analysis, three interpretative repertoires emerged. The first, 'Gender-based violence is something serious', reflected participants' acknowledgment of the social relevance of this type of violence. The second interpretative repertoire, 'Men are defenceless!', related to the perception that national legislation on gender-based violence was discriminatory to men and the perception of a lack of social sensitisation toward intimate partner violence against men. The last one, 'Trained to address gender-based violence but still unprepared' encompassed participants' confidence in their ability to identify gender-based violence but uncertainty as to how to respond to gender-based violence exposed women in terms of professional practice.

    CONCLUSIONS: Participants perceived that training has increased their knowledge and self-confidence in identifying cases. However, training should strongly challenge widespread myths about gender-based violence that could negatively affect their performance as nurses.

  • 10.
    Markström, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Bejerholm, Ulrika
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö university.
    Hansson, Lars
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Svensson, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Östman, Margareta
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Attitudes towards mental illness among health care students at Swedish universities: a follow-up study after completed clinical placement2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 660-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine the changes in attitudes towards mental illness after theorethical education and clinical placement among students from university programmes preparing for different kinds of health professions. Three different questionnaries were used, measuring the level of familaritiy with mental illness and attitudes towards mental illness in general and toward specific mental illnesses. The data were collected on two occasions, before the theorethical course and after the completed clinical placement. The result showed that the attitudes toward mental illnes in general had changed in a less stigmatising direction after the clinical placement. On the other hand, attitudes toward specific illnesses did not show any major changes.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Juthberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Deviations from venous blood specimen collection guideline adherence among senior nursing students2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 237-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite considerable efforts to increase patient safety by supporting the use of best practice medical and nursing guidelines by healthcare staff, adherence is often suboptimal. Swedish nurses often deviate from venous blood specimen collection (VBSC) guideline adherence. We assessed the adherence to national VBSC guidelines among senior nursing students.

    Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, self-reported questionnaire survey among 101 out of 177 senior nursing students consisting of web-based students in their fifth semester and campus-based students in their fifth or sixth semester out of six. In regard to the VBSC procedures, we asked about adherence to the patient identification, test request handling, and test tube labelling protocols that the students had learned during their second semester and practiced thereafter.

    Results: Guideline adherence to patient identification was reported by 81%, test request handling by 74%, and test tube labelling by 2% of the students. Students with no prior healthcare education reported to a higher extent that they operated within the guidelines regarding labelling the test tube before entering the patient's room compared to students with prior healthcare education. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, we found that fifth semester web-based program students adhered better to VBSC guidelines regarding comparing patient ID/test request/tube label compared to campus-based students.

    Conclusions: Senior nursing students were found to adhere to VBSC guidelines to a similar extent as registered nurses and other hospital ward staff in clinical healthcare. Thus student adherence to VBSC guidelines had deteriorated since their basic training in the second semester, and this can impact patient safety during university/clinical studies. The results of our study have implications for nursing practice education.

    (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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