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  • 1.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    Technoscience Studies, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlshamn, Sweden.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Design of digital democracies: Performance of citizenship, gender and IT2007In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 404-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure for this article is several Swedish IT policies that articulate goals for further development of the welfare state, which demand and enable active citizenship as well as enrolment of IT in the performance of this active citizenship. This article also examines the performance of active citizenship in a variety of sociotechnical arenas where people and technology coexist. Does the notion of active citizenship turn out a number of performances when translated into materialized technologies, such as Internet portals and web-based services? The authors juxtapose the policies with a construction of agencies in the story of citizens' design. In the last section, the discussions taking place in the parliament of things are summarized and related to the problematizations of citizenship, gender and IT.

  • 2.
    Hutchings, Tim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Contemporary religious community and the online church2011In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1118-1135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'Online churches' are Internet-based Christian communities, seeking to pursue worship, discussion, friendship, support, proselytism and other key religious practices through computer-mediated communication. This article introduces findings of a four-year ethnographic study of five very different 'online churches', focusing on the fluid, multi-layered relationship between online and offline activity developed by Christian users of blogs, forums, chatrooms, video streams and virtual worlds. Following a review of online church research and a summary of methods, this article offers an overview of each of the five groups and identifies clear parallels with earlier television ministries and recent church-planting movements. A new model of online and offline activity is proposed, focused on two pairs of concepts, familiarity/difference and isolation/integration, represented as the endpoints of two axes. These axes frame a landscape of digital practice, negotiated with great care and subtlety by online churchgoers. These negotiations are interpreted in light of wider social changes, particularly the shift from bounded community towards 'networked individualism'.

  • 3.
    Hutchings, Tim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Mediating Faiths: Religion and Socio-cultural Change in the Twenty-First Century2013In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1527-1528Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lindgren, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Pirate panics: comparing news and blog discourse on illegal file sharing in Sweden2013In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1242-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aimed at examining the barriers to and facilitators of disseminating and utilizing the results of a local Swedish school survey. Interviews with 21 school district managers/principals were performed. Results showed that dissemination and utilization of local survey data appeared as two interrelated processes. With those processes, various barriers and facilitators were mentioned. The barriers and facilitators were not merely the opposites of each other; instead they qualitatively differed from each other depending on what phase in the process the manager/principal referred to. The results also showed that the dissemination phase was both a prerequisite for and interwoven with the utilization phase, e.g. dissemination efforts were important for how the survey results were utilized.

  • 5.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Institutt for medie og kommunikasjon, Oslo universitet.
    Alander, Sara
    “Why do the orders go wrong all the time?”: Exploring sustainability in an e-commerce application in Swedish public school kitchens2010In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 68-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss sustainability, particularly social and cultural sustainability, in relation to an e-commerce application used in the kitchen of a Swedish public school. The notion of sustainability got its public definition through the Brundtland Commission and the report Our Common Future in which ecological as well as economic and social dimensions were underlined. An additional dimension, culture, has recently unfolded. The data reported in this paper were collected in public school and pre-school meal production. This is a large, institutional, tax-funded activity in Sweden as all pre-schools, compulsory schools and most upper secondary schools serve free lunch to the children and students. We discuss how an e-commerce application complicated the daily routines in the school kitchen rather than making the ordering of food stuff easier or more flexible and how small things that mattered in the staff's day-to-day activities shed light on the application's problems and weaknesses. Following Agenda 21, we relate these shortcomings to sustainability and also to participation. The discussion builds on social and cultural sustainability and participatory design with a focus on the involvement of users in design and implementation of IT systems and services.

  • 6.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mass movements in computer-mediated environments.: An account on crowds as socio-material densities.2010In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 765-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human crowds and embodied densities assume important parts in everyday life. In as much as we constitute different formations – demonstrations, traffic jams and concerts – cinematic productions, computer games and other virtual settings invite us to observe mass movements. Unfortunately, the spatial implication of crowds has not been subjected to contemporary academic research. Critical accounts of digitalization techniques and computer-mediated environments have likewise sidestepped further discussions; meticulous attention has been directed to the roles of gender and embodiment in relation to computer-mediated environments, but further scrutiny on mass movements and their entanglement with space largely lies fallow. Computer-mediated inhabitation of space contributes to reconceptualizing, not only the very notion of spatial constraints, but also earlier crowd theories, which admittedly serves to bring forth novel tenets. Scrutiny of the latter reveals a discipline, to a large extent produced according to, and in tandem with, male Western values, which have implicitly subjugated alternative aspects. At the same time, and in line with one of the premises of the iCS Key Thinkers series, this article argues that there is a range of thinkers and theoretical traditions that have a lot to offer theory and research into issues about newer media and information and communication technologies (http://www.tandf.co.uk/-journals/cfp/ricscfp.pdf 2009-12-17). Saying this, the article engages with crowds and how mass formations are enacted and articulated in computer-mediated settings. At the same time, it constitutes a research summary of earlier crowd theories. The intention is to enmesh traditional inquiries within crowd theories with a theoretical bedrock of cybercultural studies and feminist theories. In doing so, new light will confidently be shed upon the crowd as a socio-material density.

1 - 6 of 6
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