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  • 1.
    Bohm, Ingela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lindblom, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Åbacka, Gun
    Vasa Faculty of Education, Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland.
    Bengs, Carita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    "He just has to like ham": the centrality of meat in home and consumer studies2015In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 95, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe Discourses on meat in the school subject Home and Consumer Studies in five different northern Swedish schools. Fifty-nine students and five teachers from five different schools were recorded and in some cases video-taped during lessons. Results indicate that meat was seen as central to nutritional health, sensory experience, culture and social relationships. This positive view was challenged by an alternative Discourse where meat was threatening to health, sensory experience and psychological comfort, but this was not strong enough to affect centrality. Even when participants sought to promote the health advantages of reducing meat consumption, the dominant centrality Discourse was strengthened. This implies that the possible tension between physical and psychosocial/emotional health can make the benefits of a reduction difficult both to convey and accept. A form of critical food literacy may help teachers deconstruct the arbitrary power of the centrality Discourse, but it may also strengthen meat-eater identities because the social norms that guide food choice become salient. A redesign of Discourses might facilitate a reduction in meat consumption, but such a paradigm shift is dependent on the development of society as a whole, and can only be briefly touched upon within the limited timeframes and resources of Home and Consumer Studies.

  • 2. Eli, Karin
    et al.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Malek, Mahnoush Etminan
    Nowicka, Paulina
    Water, juice, or soda?: Mothers and grandmothers of preschoolers discuss the acceptability and accessibility of beverages2017In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 112, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intake of sugary beverages is strongly associated with weight gain and obesity among children; however, differences between mothers' and grandmothers' attitudes and practices concerning young children's beverage consumption remain unclear. This is notable since about a quarter of families in the US and the UK rely on grandparents as the main providers of informal childcare. The aim of this study is to examine mothers' and maternal grandmothers' attitudes, knowledge, and practices regarding preschool aged children's beverage consumption. The analysis focuses on identifying intergenerational similarities and differences, given the potential impact that such differences might have on young children's beverage consumption habits. Twenty-two semi-structured interviews, representing eleven families, were analyzed using thematic analysis. The sample included all mother – maternal grandmother dyads from The Grandparents Study, which took place in Eugene, Oregon, USA. More than half of mothers and grandmothers met overweight/obesity criteria. Among the children (mean age 4.7 years; five girls and six boys), seven met overweight/obesity criteria. Most mothers and grandmothers were unemployed, and most reported an annual household income below 30,000 USD. The analysis identified three thematic categories: 1) mothers and grandmothers agree about the hierarchy of healthiness between and within beverages, though juice occupies an ambivalent position; 2) mothers and grandmothers cite role modeling and the home environment as important in regulating preschoolers' beverage intake; 3) mothers and grandmothers balance between restricting sugary beverages and using these beverages as treats. The results suggest that when mothers and grandmothers use soda, juice, and juice-drinks as treats, they do so within a wider dynamic of balancing practices, and within two intersecting domains: the hierarchy of beverages, including the still ambivalent status of juice as healthy or unhealthy, and the definition of 'special occasion'.

  • 3.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rönnlund, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Veganism a status passage: the process of becoming a vegan among youths in Sweden2003In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a town in northern Sweden, 3.3% of the 15-year-old adolescents were vegans in 1996. This study describes the process of becoming a vegan among adolescents and interprets the informants' descriptions by constructing categories, which later on were related to relevant theories. Group interviews were conducted with three vegans and in-depth interviews were performed with three other vegan adolescents. The methodology was grounded theory and the adolescents' perceptions were analyzed in the framework of symbolic interactionism. Three types of vegans were identified: the Conformed Vegan, the Organized Vegan, and the Individualistic Vegan. The decision to become a vegan was reported to be influenced by perceived internal reasons such as ethics, health, distaste for meat, and preference for vegetarian food. In addition, friends, family, school, media, and music influenced the decision to become a vegan. The perceived consequences of becoming a vegan were positive as well as negative and differed between the three types of vegans. Veganism as a new type of status passage with specific characteristics was illustrated. No modifications or new properties were discovered that add to the theory of status passage which indicates that the general model is applicable also in a vegan context.

  • 4.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Broman, Daniel A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Garvill, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyroos, Mikaela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gender differences in factors affecting rejecting of food in healthy young Swedish adults2004In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 295-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the objectives to better understand gender-related differences in variables of importance for food intake, and interrelations between these variables, 100 healthy, young women and 100 healthy, young men responded to self-administrated questionnaires about general food rejection, learned illness-associated food aversions, disgust (the Disgust Scale), food neophobia (the Food Neophobia Scale), nausea and appetite. The results show that food rejection and aversions were more common in women (69 and 38%, respectively) than in men (47 and 18%), and that women are more disgust sensitive than men. However, no differences between women and men were observed regarding reasons for rejecting food (predominantly sensory attributes), prevalence of gastrointestinal illness as an associated aversion symptom (95 vs 89%), type of aversive food due to associated illness (predominantly high protein items), or food neophobia. Based on path analyses, a model is proposed of interrelations between disgust, food neophobia, learned food aversions, nausea, appetite, and general food rejection in healthy young adults.

1 - 4 of 4
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