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  • 1.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Sibling Ill-Health and Children's Educational Outcomes2019In: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The presence of health problems in a child is known to be negatively associated with later academic achievement, but less is known about the educational outcomes for siblings of children in poor health. The study investigated how having a sibling with health problems affects a healthy sibling’s academic achievement.

    METHODS: We utilized medical and social microdata from Swedish administrative population registers. Our sample consisted of N = 115 106 individuals (51.3% boys) born in 1990 in Sweden. We compared children with ill siblings to children whose siblings did not have poor health. Siblings’ hospital admissions and the academic achievements of the healthy sibling during their final year of compulsory education (at the age of 15-16) were analyzed using linear and logistic regression in relation to individual health- and family-related confounders.

    RESULTS: Sibling hospitalization was significantly associated with lower overall grade points (b = –10.73, p < .001) and an increased odds ratio (OR) of ineligibility for upper secondary education (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.31-1.52, p < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: School and health personnel should also consider the needs of healthy siblings during their work with children in poor health, because they too can be disadvantaged.

  • 2. Juniusdottir, Ragnheidur
    et al.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg
    Lagstrom, Hanna
    Waling, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Talvia, Sanna
    Olafsdottir, Anna S.
    Composition of school meals in Sweden, Finland and Iceland: Official guidelines and comparison with practice and availability2018In: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561, Vol. 88, no 10, p. 744-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nutritious and attractive school meals can improve health equality and public health. Current official guidelines and recommendations on food and nutrient composition of school meals in 3 Nordic countries; Sweden, Finland, and Iceland, are described and compared with actual practice, ie, availability of foods and nutrients in served reference meals in 3 selected areas in each country.

    METHODS: A country comparison was made between official guidelines, and actual practice was studied in participating schools. Reference portions of school meals (N = 170) provided in 24 compulsory schools were photographed and weighed. Food and nutrient availability were compared with official guidelines in each country.

    RESULTS: Emphasis of recommendations on whole‐grain bread in Sweden, whole grains in Finland, and fish in Iceland were reflected in food availability. The energy content of the meals provided was lower than guidelines and there was a large variation in energy content between days.

    CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines regarding food availability were quite well followed, but the large variation in energy and nutrient content of provided school meals between days indicates a need for standardization.

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