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  • 1. Barreto, Philipe de Souto
    et al.
    Morley, John E.
    Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek
    Pitkala, Kaisu H.
    Weening-Djiksterhuis, Elizabeth
    Rodriguez-Manas, Leocadio
    Barbagallo, Mario
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Sinclair, Alan
    Landi, Francesco
    Izquierdo, Mikel
    Vellas, Bruno
    Rolland, Yves
    Recommendations on Physical Activity and Exercise for Older Adults Living in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Taskforce Report2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 381-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A taskforce, under the auspices of The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-Global Aging Research Network (IAGG-GARN) and the IAGG European Region Clinical Section, composed of experts from the fields of exercise science and geriatrics, met in Toulouse, in December 2015, with the aim of establishing recommendations of physical activity and exercise for older adults living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Due to the high heterogeneity in terms of functional ability and cognitive function that characterizes older adults living in LTCFs, taskforce members established 2 sets of recommendations: recommendations for reducing sedentary behaviors for all LTCF residents and recommendations for defining specific, evidence-based guidelines for exercise training for subgroups of LTCF residents. To promote a successful implementation of recommendations, taskforce experts highlighted the importance of promoting residents' motivation and pleasure, the key factors that can be increased when taking into account residents' desires, preferences, beliefs, and attitudes toward physical activity and exercise. The importance of organizational factors related to LTCFs and health care systems were recognized by the experts. In conclusion, this taskforce report proposes standards for the elaboration of strategies to increase physical activity as well as to prescribe exercise programs for older adults living in LTCFs. This report should be used as a guide for professionals working in LTCF settings.

  • 2. Corazzini, Kirsten N.
    et al.
    Anderson, Ruth A.
    Bowers, Barbara J.
    Chu, Charlene H.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Fagertun, Anette
    Gordon, Adam L.
    Leung, Angela Y. M.
    McGilton, Katherine S.
    Meyer, Julienne E.
    Siegel, Elena O.
    Thompson, Roy
    Wang, Jing
    Wei, Sijia
    Wu, Bei
    Lepore, Michael J.
    Toward Common Data Elements for International Research in Long-term Care Homes: Advancing Person-Centered Care2019In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 598-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support person-centered, residential long-term care internationally, a consortium of researchers in medicine, nursing, behavioral, and social sciences from 21 geographically and economically diverse countries have launched the WE-THRIVE consortium to develop a common data infrastructure. WE-THRIVE aims to identify measurement domains that are internationally relevant, including in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, prioritize concepts to operationalize domains, and specify a set of data elements to measure concepts that can be used across studies for data sharing and comparisons. This article reports findings from consortium meetings at the 2016 meeting of the Gerontological Society of America and the 2017 meeting of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics, to identify domains and prioritize concepts, following best practices to identify common data elements (CDEs) that were developed through the US National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research's CDEs initiative. Four domains were identified, including organizational context, workforce and staffing, person-centered care, and care outcomes. Using a nominal group process, WE-THRIVE prioritized 21 concepts across the 4 domains. Several concepts showed similarity to existing measurement structures, whereas others differed. Conceptual similarity (convergence; eg, concepts in the care outcomes domain of functional level and harm-free care) provides further support of the critical foundational work in LTC measurement endorsed and implemented by regulatory bodies. Different concepts (divergence; eg, concepts in the person-centered care domain of knowing the person and what matters most to the person) highlights current gaps in measurement efforts and is consistent with WE-THRIVE's focus on supporting resilience and thriving for residents, family, and staff. In alignment with the World Health Organization's call for comparative measurement work for health systems change, WE-THRIVE's work to date highlights the benefits of engaging with diverse LTC researchers, including those in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, to develop a measurement infrastructure that integrates the aspirations of person-centered LTC.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Greater Fall Risk in Elderly Women Than in Men Is Associated With Increased Gait Variability During Multitasking2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 535-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: As 90% of fractures are caused by falls, and as fractures are more common in elderly women than in elderly men, a better understanding of potential sex differences in fall rates and underlying mechanisms is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether women are more prone than men to falling, and to evaluate whether the risk of falling is associated with variations in gait patterns.

    Design, setting, and participants: The cohort for this prospective observational study consisted of 1390 community-dwelling men and women aged 70 years, examined in a health survey between July 2012 and November 2014.

    Measurements: Gait patterns were measured using a computerized walkway system during normal-speed, fast-speed, and dual-task trials. Triaxial accelerometers were used to collect objective data on physical activity, and self-reported fall data were collected by telephone 6 and 12 months after examination. Incident low-energy falls were defined as unexpected events in which participants came to rest on the ground.

    Results: During the follow-up period, 148 study participants (88 women, 60 men; P = .01) reported falls. After adjusting for multiple confounders, including objective measures of physical activity, socioeconomic factors, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive function, the odds ratio for falling in women was 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–2.19). Variations in gait pattern were significantly (20%–40%) increased in fallers compared with nonfallers during the dual-task trial for step width, step length, stride length, step time, stance time, stride velocity, and single support time (all P < .05). Furthermore, women showed 15% to 35% increased variability in all of these gait parameters during the dual-task trial compared with men (all P < .01).

    Conclusion: In the present cohort, 70-year-old women were at greater risk of falls compared with their male counterparts. This increased risk was associated with increased variation in gait pattern during dual-task activities, and may contribute to women's greater fracture risk compared with men.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Berggren, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Stenvall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation on Walking Ability and Length of Hospital Stay After Hip Fracture: A Randomized Controlled Trial2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 464.e9-464.e15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate if Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation could improve walking ability for older people with hip fracture compared with conventional geriatric care and rehabilitation. A secondary aim was to investigate the postoperative length of hospital stay (LOS).

    Design: Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting: Geriatric ward, ordinary housing, and residential care facilities.

    Participants: People operated on for a hip fracture (n = 205), aged 70 or older, including those with cognitive impairment, and living in the north of Sweden.

    Intervention: Home rehabilitation with the aim of early hospital discharge that was individually designed and carried out by an interdisciplinary team for a maximum of 10 weeks. Special priority was given to prevention of falls, independence in daily activities, and walking ability both indoors and outdoors.

    Measurements: Walking ability and the use of walking device was assessed in an interview during the hospital stay. These assessments were repeated along with gait speed measurements at 3- and 12-month follow-up. The length of the hospital stay after the hip fracture was recorded.

    Results: No significant differences were observed in walking ability, use of walking device, and gait speed at the 3- and 12-month follow-up between the groups. At 12 months, 56.3% of the intervention group and 57.7% of the control group had regained or improved their prefracture walking ability. The median postoperative LOS in the geriatric ward was 6 days shorter for the intervention group (P = .003).

    Conclusion: Participants receiving Geriatric Interdisciplinary Home Rehabilitation regained walking ability in the short-and long-term similar to those receiving conventional geriatric care and rehabilitation according to a multifactorial rehabilitation program. The intervention group had a significantly shorter postoperative LOS in the hospital.

  • 5.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Hommel, Ami
    Norrman, Per Ola
    Thorngren, Karl-Göran
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Geriatric Rehabilitation and Discharge Location After Hip Fracture in Relation to the Risks of Death and Readmission2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 91.e1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of geriatric rehabilitation on short-term risk of death and readmission after a hip fracture were investigated in a nationwide cohort. In addition, the association of discharge location (nursing home or patient's home) with the short-term risk of death was assessed.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The cohort consisted of 89,301 individuals at least 50 years of age, with a first hip fracture registered in the Swedish quality register RIKSHÖFT, the years 2004-2012.

    MEASURES: Short-term risk of death and readmission to hospital after discharge was compared at 8 hospitals, where most patients received inpatient care in geriatric wards, and those treated at 71 regular hospitals.

    RESULTS: The risks of death within 30 days of admission were 7.1% in patients admitted to geriatric ward hospitals and 7.4% in those treated at regular hospitals (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.85-0.97), whereas the odds of readmission within 30 days of discharge were 8.7% and 9.8%, respectively (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.81-0.91). The risk of death was influenced by discharge location and inpatient length of stay (LOS). Thus, for patients discharged to short-term nursing homes with a LOS of at most 10 days, each additional day of LOS reduction increased the risk of death within 30 days of discharge by 13% (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.18). This association was reduced in patients discharged to permanent nursing homes (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.07), and not significant in those discharged to their own home (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.10).

    CONCLUSION: The risks of death and readmission were lower in patients with hip fracture who received care in hospitals with geriatric wards. The risk of death after discharge increased with shorter LOS, especially in patients discharged to short-term nursing homes.

  • 6.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Thorngren, Karl-Gunnar
    Hommel, Ami
    Ziden, Lena
    Anttila, Sten
    Effects of Geriatric Team Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials2018In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 840-845Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Systematic rehabilitation by geriatric interdisciplinary teams has been associated with favorable outcomes in frail older patients. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of interdisciplinary geriatric team rehabilitation in older patients with hip fracture. Design, setting, and participants: Randomized controlled trials involving participants sustaining hip fractures at the age of 65 years or older were included. Included trials evaluated effects of interdisciplinary geriatric team rehabilitation compared with usual postoperative care and reported on at least one of the following outcomes: activities of daily living (ADLs), physical function, mobility, depression, cognitive function, discharge to home, quality of life, influence on relatives, complications, and survival. Seven studies of at least moderate quality with a total of 1763 participants were included. Measures: Data were combined using a random-effects model. The GRADE system (1-4, where 4 is highest level of evidence) was used to rate the quality of the estimates. Results: Outcomes were grouped into 4 categories, each of which was reported on in at least 4 studies: ADL/physical function, mobility, living in one's own home, and survival. Interdisciplinary geriatric team rehabilitation increased ADL/physical function (standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.47) and mobility (SMD, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.12-0.52) compared with conventional care. In contrast, interdisciplinary geriatric team rehabilitation did not increase the chance of living in one's own home after discharge (risk ratio [RR], 1.07; 95% CI, 0.99-1.16) or survival (RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.99-1.06) compared with conventional care. All results were rated as GRADE 3. Conclusion: Systematic rehabilitation by geriatric interdisciplinary teams increases physical function and mobility significantly compared with conventional care in patients with hip fracture. In contrast, the chance of being discharged to one's own home and survival are not influenced.

  • 7.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Toots, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Thorngren, Karl-Göran
    Hommel, Ami
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Bisphosphonate Use After Hip Fracture in Older Adults: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study2017In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 515-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between bisphosphonate use and the risk of new fracture in a nationwide cohort of individuals with previous hip fractures, with emphasis on individuals above 80 years of age.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: From a nationwide cohort with hip fracture (2006-2012) (n = 93, 601), each individual prescribed bisphosphonates after hip fracture (n = 5845) was matched with up to three individuals not prescribed bisphosphonates, resulting in a cohort of 21,363 individuals.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A new hip fracture.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 2.98 (range, 0.02-8) years, 4581 fractures occurred in the cohort. Before the initiation of bisphosphonate therapy, individuals later prescribed bisphosphonates had an increased risk of hip fracture (multivariable adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.23-3.24) compared with controls. In the period after bisphosphonate therapy initiation, individuals prescribed bisphosphonates had a lower risk of hip fracture (multivariable adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% CI, 0.65-0.90) compared with controls. Similar effects were seen after the initiation of bisphosphonates in individuals aged more than 80 years (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.62-0.99). In contrast, the initiation of bisphosphonate therapy did not influence the risk of injurious falls not resulting in fracture (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.86-1.05).

    CONCLUSION: Bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture in this nationwide cohort of older men and women, with similar risk reductions in individuals older than 80 years.

  • 8.
    Toots, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Holmberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Walking aids moderate exercise effects on gait speed in people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial2017In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of exercise on gait speed, when tested using walking aids and without, and whether effects differed according to amount of support in the test.

    DESIGN: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: The Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study was set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: One hundred forty-one women and 45 men (mean age 85 years) with dementia, of whom 145 (78%) habitually used walking aids.

    INTERVENTION: Participants were randomized to the high-intensity functional exercise program or a seated attention control activity.

    MEASUREMENTS: Blinded assessors measured 4-m usual gait speed with walking aids if any gait speed (GS), and without walking aids and with minimum amount of support, at baseline, 4 months (on intervention completion), and 7 months.

    RESULTS: Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect in either gait speed test at 4 or 7 months. In interaction analyses exercise effects differed significantly between participants who walked unsupported compared with when walking aids or minimum support was used. Positive between-group exercise effects on gait speed (m/s) were found in subgroups that walked unsupported at 4 and 7 months (GS: 0.07, P = .009 and 0.13, P < .001; and GS test without walking aids: 0.05, P = .011 and 0.07, P = .029, respectively).

    CONCLUSIONS: In people with dementia living in nursing homes exercise had positive effects on gait when tested unsupported compared with when walking aids or minimum support was used. The study suggests that the use of walking aids in gait speed tests may conceal exercise effects.

  • 9.
    Toots, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Usual gait speed independently predicts mortality in very old people: a population-based study2013In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 529.e1-529.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: In older people, usual gait speed has been shown to independently predict mortality; however, less is known about whether usual gait speed is as informative in very old populations, in which prevalence of multimorbidity and disability is high. The aim of this study was to investigate if usual gait speed can independently predict all-cause mortality in very old people, and whether the prediction is influenced by dementia disorder, dependency in activities of daily living (ADL), or use of walking aids in the gait speed test.

    Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Population-based study in northern Sweden and Finland (the Umea 85+/GERDA Study).

    Participants: A total of 772 participants with a mean age of 89.6 years, 70% women, 33% with dementia disorders, 54% with ADL dependency, and 39% living in residential care facilities.

    Measurements: Usual gait speed assessed over 2.4 meters and mortality followed-up for 5 years. Results: The mean +/- SD gait speed was 0.52 +/- 0.21 m/s for the 620 (80%) participants able to complete the gait speed test. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses adjusted for potential confounders were performed. Compared with the fastest gait speed group (>= 0.64 m/s), the hazard ratio for mortality was for the following groups: unable = 2.27 (P < .001), <= 0.36 m/s = 1.97 (P = .001), 0.37 to 0.49 m/s = 1.99 (P < .001), 0.50 to 0.63 m/s = 1.11 (P = .604). No interaction effects were found between gait speed and age, sex, dementia disorder, dependency in ADLs, or use of walking aids.

    Conclusion: Among people aged 85 or older, including people dependent in ADLs and with dementia disorders, usual gait speed was an independent predictor of 5-year all-cause mortality. Inability to complete the gait test or gait speeds slower than 0.5 m/s appears to be associated with higher mortality risk. Gait speed might be a useful clinical indicator of health status among very old people.

  • 10.
    Toots, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Wiklund, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nordin, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    The Effects of Exercise on Falls in Older People With Dementia Living in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 835-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate exercise effects on falls in people with dementia living in nursing homes, and whether effects were dependent on sex, dementia type, or improvement in balance. A further aim was to describe the occurrence of fall-related injuries.

    DESIGN: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The Umeå Dementia and Exercise study was set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden and included 141 women and 45 men, a mean age of 85 years, and with a mean Mini-Mental State Examination score of 15.

    INTERVENTION: Participants were randomized to the high-intensity functional exercise program or a seated attention control activity; each conducted 2-3 times per week for 4 months.

    MEASURES: Falls and fall-related injuries were followed for 12 months (after intervention completion) by blinded review of medical records. Injuries were classified according to severity.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 118(67%) of the participants fell 473 times in total. At the interim 6-month follow-up, the incidence rate was 2.7 and 2.8 falls per person-year in exercise and control group, respectively, and at 12-month follow-up 3.0 and 3.2 falls per person-year, respectively. Negative binomial regression analyses indicated no difference in fall rate between groups at 6 or 12 months (incidence rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-1.7, P = .838 and incidence rate ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6, P = .782, respectively). No differences in exercise effects were found according to sex, dementia type, or improvement in balance. Participants in the exercise group were less likely to sustain moderate/serious fall-related injuries at 12-month follow-up (odds ratio 0.31, 95% CI 0.10-0.94, P = .039).

    CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: In older people with dementia living in nursing homes, a high-intensity functional exercise program alone did not prevent falls when compared with an attention control group. In high-risk populations, in which multimorbidity and polypharmacy are common, a multifactorial fall-prevention approach may be required. Encouraging effects on fall-related injuries were observed, which merits future investigations.

  • 11.
    Vikberg, Sanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sörlén, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Brandén, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sports Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway..
    Hult, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of Resistance Training on Functional Strength and Muscle Mass in 70-Year-Old Individuals With Pre-sarcopenia: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Sarcopenia has been defined as age-related loss of muscle mass and function. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the effects of a 10-week instructor-led resistance training program on functional strength and body composition in men and women aged 70 years with pre-sarcopenia.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants were randomized to either 10 weeks of a physical training regimen including optional nutritional supplementation (n = 36) or to a control group (n = 34) (ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT03297632). The main outcome was changes in the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) score. Secondary outcomes included the Timed Up and Go test, chair sit-stand time, lean body mass, and fat mass.

    RESULTS: The intervention had no significant effect on SPPB in the total cohort (P = .18), when comparing changes in the intervention group with the control group. However, those given the intervention in the male subcohort increased 0.5 ± 0.4 (mean ± standard error for the difference) points in SPPB during follow-up (P = .02) compared to male controls. With respect to secondary outcomes, the intervention group decreased 0.9 ± 0.6 seconds in chair sit-stand time compared to controls (P = .01). Furthermore, the intervention resulted in significantly greater improvements for the training group than control group in all measures of body composition (P ≤ .01 for all). For example, lean body mass increased by a mean of 1147 ± 282 g (P < .001), and total fat mass decreased by a mean of 553 ± 225 g (P = .003), favoring the intervention group.

    CONCLUSION/IMPLICATIONS: The main finding of this intervention study is that an easy-to-use, functional resistance training program was effective in maintaining functional strength and increasing muscle mass in older adults with pre-sarcopenia.

  • 12.
    Weidung, Bodil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Boström, Gustaf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Toots, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Littbrand, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Blood Pressure, Gait Speed, and Mortality in Very Old Individuals: A Population-Based Cohort Study2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 208-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Clinical trials and observational studies have produced contradictory results regarding the association of blood pressure (BP) and mortality in people aged 80 years or older. Gait speed at usual pace has been shown to moderate this association in a population of noninstitutionalized people aged 65 years or older. The aims of this study were to investigate the association of BP with all-cause mortality in a representative sample of people aged 85 years or older and to assess whether gait speed moderates this association.

    Design, Setting, and Participants: A total of 806 participants in the population-based prospective Umeå 85+/GERDA study aged 85, 90, and 95 years or older.

    Measurements: Gait speed at usual pace was measured over 2.4 m. The main outcome was hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality according to systolic and diastolic BP categories in the total sample and in faster-walking (≥0.5 m/s, n = 312) and slower-walking (<0.5 m/s, n = 433) subcohorts; the latter also included habitually nonwalking participants. Comprehensive adjustments were made for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics associated with death.

    Results: Mean age and baseline systolic and diastolic BP were 89.6 ± 4.6 years, 146.8 ± 23.9 mm Hg, and 74.8 ± 11.1 mm Hg, respectively. Most (n = 561 [69%]) participants were women, 315 (39%) were care facility residents, and 566 (70%) were prescribed BP-lowering drugs. Within 5 years, 490 (61%) participants died. In the total sample and slower-walking subcohort, systolic BP appeared to be inversely associated with mortality, although not independent of adjustments. Among faster-walking participants, mortality risk after adjustment was more than 2 times higher in those with systolic BP of 140 to 149 mm Hg (HR = 2.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–4.94) and 165 mm Hg or higher (HR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.01–4.49), compared with systolic BP of 126 to 139 mm Hg. Mortality risk was also independently higher in faster-walking participants with diastolic BP higher than 80 mm Hg, compared with diastolic BP of 75 to 80 mm Hg (HR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.07–2.90).

    Conclusion: The gait speed threshold of 0.5 m/s may be clinically useful for the distinction of very old people with and without increased all-cause mortality risk due to elevated systolic and diastolic BP.

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