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  • 1.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Ekman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Chronic Fatigue in Patients With Previous Traumatic Brain Injury: changes linked to altered Striato-Thalamic-Cortical Functioning2018In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 266-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to detect fatigue after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Setting: Neurorehabilitation clinic.

    Participants: Patients with TBI (n = 57) and self-experienced fatigue more than 1 year postinjury, and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 27).

    Main Measures: Self-assessment scales of fatigue, a neuropsychological test battery, and fMRI scanning during performance of a fatiguing 27-minute attention task.

    Results: During testing within the fMRI scanner, patients showed a higher increase in self-reported fatigue than controls from before to after completing the task (P < .001).The patients also showed lower activity in several regions, including bilateral caudate, thalamus, and anterior insula (all P < .05). Furthermore, the patients failed to display decreased activation over time in regions of interest: the bilateral caudate and anterior thalamus (all P < .01). Left caudate activity correctly identified 91% of patients and 81% of controls, resulting in a positive predictive value of 91%.

    Conclusion: The results suggest that chronic fatigue after TBI is associated with altered striato-thalamic-cortical functioning. It would be of interest to study whether fMRI can be used to support the diagnosis of chronic fatigue in future studies.

  • 2.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Medicine.
    Ekman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Pharmaco-fMRI in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial With the Monoaminergic Stabilizer (-)-OSU61622019In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 189-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of monoaminergic stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 on brain activity, as measured by blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in patients in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury suffering from fatigue.

    SETTING: Neurorehabilitation clinic.

    PARTICIPANTS: Patients with traumatic brain injury received either placebo (n = 24) or active treatment (n = 28). Healthy controls (n = 27) went through fMRI examination at one point and were used in sensitivity analysis on normalization of BOLD response.

    DESIGN: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design.

    MAIN MEASURES: Effects on BOLD signal changes from before to after treatment during performance of a fatiguing attention task.

    RESULTS: The fMRI results revealed treatment effects within the right occipitotemporal cortex and the right orbitofrontal cortex. In these regions, the BOLD response was normalized relative to healthy controls at the postintervention fMRI session. No effects were seen in regions in which we previously observed activity differences between patients and healthy controls while performing this fMRI task, such as the striatum.

    CONCLUSION: (-)-OSU6162 treatment had influences on functional brain activity, although the normalized regional BOLD response was observed in regions that were not a priori hypothesized to be sensitive to this particular treatment, and was not accompanied by any effects on in-scanner test performance or on fatigue.

  • 3.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Schuit, Robert
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    The effects of (-)-OSU6162 on chronic fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial2017In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. E46-E54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the monoaminergic stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 on mental fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    SETTING: Single-center Neurorehabilitation Clinic.

    DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-four subjects with traumatic brain injury were randomized to treatment (n = 33) and placebo (n = 31).

    MAIN MEASURES: The effects of (-)-OSU6162 at a dose of 15 mg twice a day were evaluated using self-assessment scales and neuropsychological tests measuring mental fatigue.

    RESULTS: No difference between groups was observed on any scale at baseline. At follow-up, both groups showed significant improvement on the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Mental Fatigue Scale (both Ps < .01). Similarly, the performance of both groups increased significantly on many neuropsychological tests. However, no significant between-group difference in changes on these scales was observed before or after adjustment for confounders except for one neuropsychological test favoring the control group. Sensitivity analyses showed significantly greater changes in levels of prolactin and folic acid and heart rate (all Ps < .05) in the treatment group. The mean plasma concentration after 4 weeks of treatment was 0.14 (range, 0.01-0.32) μM, which was lower than expected.

    INTERPRETATION: Treatment with (-)-OSU6162 had no significant effect on mental fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with placebo.

  • 4. Godbolt, Alison K.
    et al.
    Stenberg, Maud
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Lindgren, Marie
    Ulfarsson, Trandur
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Nygren DeBoussard, Catharina
    Associations between care pathways and outcome 1 year after severe traumatic brain injury2015In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. E41-E51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess associations between real-world care pathways for working-age patients in the first year after severe traumatic brain injury and outcomes at 1 year.

    Setting and Design: Prospective, observational study with recruitment from 6 neurosurgical centers in Sweden and Iceland. Follow-up to 1 year, independently of care pathways, by rehabilitation physicians and paramedical professionals.

    Participants: Patients with severe traumatic brain injury, lowest (nonsedated) Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 8 during the first 24 hours and requiring neurosurgical intensive care, age 18 to 65 years, and alive 3 weeks after injury.

    Main Measures: Length of stay in intensive care, time between intensive care discharge and rehabilitation admission, outcome at 1 year (Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended score), acute markers of injury severity, preexisting medical conditions, and post-acute complications. Logistic regression analyses were performed.

    Results: A multivariate model found variables significantly associated with outcome (odds ratio for good outcome [confidence interval], P value) to be as follows: length of stay in intensive care (0.92 [0.87-0.98], 0.014), time between intensive care discharge and admission to inpatient rehabilitation (0.97 [0.94-0.99], 0.017), and post-acute complications (0.058 [0.006-0.60], 0.017).

    Conclusions: Delays in rehabilitation admission were negatively associated with outcome. Measures to ensure timely rehabilitation admission may improve outcome. Further research is needed to evaluate possible causation.

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