umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bengs, Carita
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Johansson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Danielsson, Ulla EB
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lehti, Arja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Gendered portraits of depression in Swedish newspapers2008In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 962-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass media are influential mediators of information, knowledge, and narratives of health and illness. In this article, we report on an examination of personal accounts of illness as presented in three Swedish newspapers, focusing on the gendered representation of laypersons' experiences of depression. A database search identified all articles mentioning depression during the year 2002. Twenty six articles focusing on personal experiences of depression were then subjected to a qualitative content analysis. We identified four themes: displaying a successful facade, experiencing a cracking facade, losing and regaining control, and explaining the illness. We found both similarities and differences with regard to gendered experiences. The mediated accounts of depression both upheld and challenged traditional gender stereotypes. The women's stories were more detailed, relational, emotionally oriented, and embodied. The portrayal of men was less emotional and expressive, and described a more dramatic onset of depression, reflecting hegemonic patterns of masculinity.

  • 2. Björk, Anna-Bell
    et al.
    Sjöström, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Johansson, Eva E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Umefjord, Goran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Women's Experiences of Internet-Based or Postal Treatment for Stress Urinary Incontinence2014In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 484-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress urinary incontinence is common and sometimes embarrassing. New, simple, and easily accessible treatments are needed. We telephone interviewed 21 women who participated in a randomized controlled study comparing two treatment programs based on instructions for pelvic floor muscle training. One program was Internet-based and included email support by a urotherapist; the other was sent by post. There was no face-to-face contact in either program. Our main aim was to explore the women's experiences of the Internet-based treatment. Grounded theory analysis revealed three categories: hidden but present, at a distance but close, and by myself but not alone. These were incorporated in a core category: acknowledged but not exposed. The leakage was often a well-hidden secret, but the study treatments lowered the barrier for seeking care. In the Internet group, a supportive patient-provider relationship developed despite the lack of face-to-face contact. Internet-based treatment programs can increase access to care and empower women.

  • 3.
    Danielsson, Ulla EB
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Bengs, Carita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Johansson, Eva E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    "My greatest dream is to be normal": the impact of gender on depression narratives of young Swedish women and men2011In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 612-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is common among young people. Gender differences in diagnosing depression appear during adolescence. The study aim was to explore the impact of gender on depression in young Swedish men and women. Grounded theory was used to analyze interviews with 23 young people aged 17 to 25 years who had been diagnosed with depression. Their narratives were marked by a striving to be normal and disclosed strong gender stereotypes, constructed in interaction with parents, friends, and the media. Gender norms were upheld by feelings of shame, and restricted the acting space of our informants. However, we also found transgressions of these gender norms. Primary health care workers could encourage young men to open up emotionally and communicate their personal distress, and young women to be daring and assertive of their own strengths, so that both genders might gain access to the positive coping strategies practiced respectively by each.

  • 4.
    Elwér, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Health against the odds: experiences of employees in elder care from a gender perspective2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1202-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women-dominated elder care in Sweden is a low-paid, low-status job with a high prevalence of sick leave. Our aim was to analyze health experiences of employees in elder care from a gender perspective. All caregiving staff at two establishments providing care to the elderly were invited to participate in the study. A moderator led seven focus group discussions. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed focus groups. We identified two central themes in relation to the employees' health. "Working against the odds" describes gendered workplace stressors of a structural character, to a large extent triggered by societal processes outside the organization. "Making work matter" refers to gendered health resources with a relational character, constructed within the organization. Health-promoting programs directed toward women-dominated workplaces need to include a gender perspective, and focus on creating structural, supportive environments to avoid the negative health effects of the stressors.

  • 5.
    Enarsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hellzén, Ove
    The preservation of order: the use of common approach among staff toward clients in long-term psychiatric care2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 718-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors performed this grounded theory study to gain a deeper understanding of the kinds of social processes that lead to a need among psychiatric nursing staff to reach a common approach on how to act toward individual clients in long-term psychiatric care. They present a theory about the development of such common approaches among staff. The main findings were that in psychiatric group dwellings, when the internal order is perceived as having been disturbed, the staff preserve or restore the internal order by formulating and reaching a common approach. The staff negotiated with each other to achieve an agreement on how to act and behave toward the individual client. The authors isolate and describe different types of order-disturbing incidents and the common approaches taken by the staff in dealing with them. However, their data also show that staff often had difficulties in maintaining a common approach over time.

  • 6.
    Forssen, Annika S. K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lifelong Significance of Disempowering Experiences in Prenatal and Maternity Care: Interviews With Elderly Swedish Women2012In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 1535-1546Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I show how the effects of harsh and humiliating treatment, experienced by a number of Swedish women in antenatal care and childbirth in the mid-20th Century, endured for the rest of their lives. This treatment was carried out by medical staff in conformity with a view of expectant mothers as irresponsible and ignorant and with the prevalent idea of "natural birth." These effects were findings in an interview investigation that, with a colleague, I conducted into paid and unpaid work and health of 20 women, seen in a lifetime perspective. Our biomedical way of understanding risks and complications during pregnancy and birthing was confronted with many participants' feelings of distress, guilt, and grief linked to their childbearing experience. I interpret the treatments as "violations of dignity" and as abuse. The consequences are similar to those following traumatic birth experiences described in today's literature.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Eva E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Bengs, Carita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Danielsson, Ulla EB
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lehti, Arja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Gaps between patients, media and academic medicine in discourses on gender and depression: a metasynthesis2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 633-644Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Lindahl, Berit
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    On being dependent on home mechanical ventilation: depictions of patients' experiences over time.2006In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 881-901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the authors describe the meanings of experiences of being dependent on a ventilator (HMV) and living at home as narrated by 13 people who had been using a ventilator via a mask or tracheostomy for half a year. The analyses revealed various movements across time toward the goal of using the ventilator successfully, and some narratives depicted suffering caused by care. The analyses also yielded different representations of embodiment. These findings were abstracted into two contrasting meanings of the experience of using HMV over time: a closing in or an opening up of the lived body, oneself, to other people and to the world. The authors illustrate this interpretation with two images. Ignorance and negative attitudes on the part of professionals working and/or managing care in the patients' homes are interpreted as causing suffering and intensifying a closed-in mode of being.

  • 9.
    Lindqvist, Olav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Threlkeld, Guinever
    Street, Annette F
    Tishelman, Carol
    Reflections on using biographical approaches in end-of-life care: dignity therapy as example2015In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 40-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The therapeutic potential of nonpharmacologic interventions using biographical approaches at the end of life (EoL) is being increasingly recognized, but less attention is paid to processes impeding realization of this potential. In this article, Swedish and Australian researchers reflect on and problematize experiences using one biographical approach, dignity therapy (DT), in EoL care in Sweden. We use this as an example, focusing on critical examination of the process of applying DT in practice, examining frictions experienced in recruiting participants, collecting the data, and creating a biography. We discuss issues regarding agency, which became evident in the recruitment process and choices made about participation, and the power differentials manifested in the interactive process of eliciting stories and crafting them into a final product. We also raise salient questions about how research and practice with biographical approaches in EoL care might better build on and further existing knowledge to better reflect the complexities of everyday life.

  • 10.
    Lindström, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sjöström, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Stories of rediscovering agency: home-based occupational therapy for people with severe psychiatric disability2013In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 728-740Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a larger study, we offered Everyday Life Rehabilitation (ELR) as a model for integrated occupational therapy in sheltered or supported housing facilities, to enable meaningful daily occupations for people with psychiatric disabilities. Our aim of this article was to understand how participants make sense of their occupational transformations in the context of their everyday life and life history. We carried out qualitative interviews and field observations with 16 participants with psychosis-related disorders. We used narrative analysis and disclosed stories of ‘rediscovering agency’, referring to occupational and identity transformations. A parallel outcome article has shown positive results for participants, and by narrative inquiry we contribute with a deeper understanding of the meaning-making of their transformations and mechanisms of the intervention; i.e. hope, extended value of reaching goals, re-entering the majority world, and transparency of process and attunement to the individual. The findings support the use of the ELR-intervention.

  • 11.
    Löfmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Allmänmedicin.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Allmänmedicin.
    Older stroke patients' negotiations within the hierarchic medical context.2005In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 778-790Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lyon, Phil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Food that makes you different: the stigma experienced by adolescents with celiac disease2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 976-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For adolescents with celiac disease (CD), a gluten-free diet(GFD) is crucial for health, but compliance is problematic andnoncompliance is common even among those aware of the risks.To better understand their lives with the disease, Swedish CDadolescents were invited to take part in focus group discussions.Data were analyzed for recurrent stigma-related themes acrossthe groups. Adolescents described an awareness of being differentfrom others that was produced by meal appearance and the pooravailability of gluten-free food. The GFD often required discussionsand special requests, so eating in public had the effect ofmaking an invisible condition visible, and thereby creatinga context for felt or enacted stigma. Maintaining invisibilityavoided negative consequences of stigma, and other strategieswere used to reduce the costs of visibility. The results ofthe study show that the GFD can produce stigma experiences inadolescence, and that dietary compliance (or lack thereof) canbe understood in terms of dealing with GFD concealment and disclosure.

  • 13.
    Paulson, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sweden and Institute of Nursing Faculty and Caring Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg, University, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Department of Health Science, University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Struggling for a Tolerable Existence: The Meaning of Men’s Lived Experiences of Living with Pain of Fibromyalgia Type2002In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 238-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic pain is a major health problem in Sweden because of its consequences in daily life. Fourteen men with fibromyalgia-type pain were interviewed regarding their experiences. A phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to interpret the transcribed interviews. Three major themes emerged: experiencing the body as an obstruction, being a different man, and striving to endure. Overall, the meaning of men’s lived experience of chronic pain was experienced as change in the body, self, and relationships. Striving to live life required achieving balance during both calm and difficult phases of the illness—struggling for a tolerable existence. Information from this study could provide guidelines for health care staff members to give empathic and supportive care to men living with a long-term illness.

  • 14.
    Stecksén, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Implementing thrombolytic guidelines in stroke care: perceived facilitators and barriers2014In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 412-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a qualitative study to identify facilitators of and barriers to the implementation of national guidelines on thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We interviewed physicians and nurses at nine Swedish hospitals using 16 explorative, semistructured interviews, and selected hospitals based on their implementation rate of new stroke care methods according to data from the Swedish Stroke Register, Riks-Stroke. Through content analysis, we identified facilitators and barriers to implementation, which we classified into three categories: (a) individuals, (b) social interactions and context, and (c) organizational and resource issues. Insights obtained from this study can be used to identify target areas for improving the implementation of thrombolytic therapy and other new methods in stroke care.

  • 15.
    Sundin, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Jansson, Lilian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    The meaning of skilled care providers' relationships with stroke and aphasia patients.2001In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 308-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the reciprocal influence of communication difficulties on the care relationship. To illuminate care providers' lived experiences of relationships with stroke and aphasia patients, narrative interviews were conducted with providers particularly successful at communicating with patients. A phenomenological hermeneutic analysis of the narratives revealed three themes: Calling forth responsibility through fragility, restoring the patient's dignity, and being in a state of understanding. The analysis disclosed caring with regard to the patient's desire, which has its starting point in intersubjective relationship and interplay, in which nonverbal communication is essential--that is, open participation while meeting the patient as a presence. Thus, care providers prepare for deep fellowship, or communion, by being available. They described an equality with patients, interpreted as fraternity and reciprocity, that is a necessary element in presence as communion. The works of Marcel, Hegel, Stern, and Ricoeur provided the theoretical framework for the interpretation.

  • 16.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Department of Research and Development, County Council of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden..
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Being present in a distant room: A study of the qualitative aspects of teleconsultations with older people in a nursing home2004In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1046-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Uttjek, Margaretha
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Dufåker, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Marked by visibility of psoriasis in everyday life.2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 364-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the authors aimed at a sociological approach to the individual’s everyday life with psoriasis and to this end conducted qualitative interviews with 18 persons from a county in northern Sweden. The most difficult aspects of living with psoriasis were being marked by the visibility of psoriasis, especially in the younger ages, and the visibility of joint changes. Therefore, those with both rashes and joint changes felt marked and discredited in a twofold way. Commonly used coping strategies were routinization of both the treatment and the adjustment to the marking process, and acceptance, and these strategies developed with age. Most participants experienced a good quality of life but still could find nothing positive about psoriasis. The authors suggest efforts toward increased awareness among health care professionals of the marking process and future qualitative studies about experiences of psoriasis during adolescence.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf