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  • 1.
    Andersson, Lars Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Mutual insurance 1550-2015: from guild welfare and friendly societies to contemporary micro-insurers2018In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 447-449Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    De Veirman, Sofie
    et al.
    History Department, Ghent Univeristy .
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Deaf and unwanted?: marriage characteristics of deaf people in eighteenth and nineteenth-century Belgium: a comparative and cross-regional approach2016In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 241-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the marriage characteristics of deaf men and women born in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Belgium are compared to each other, as well as to a group of non-deaf siblings and a group of Swedish deaf persons. The aim is to determine the extent to which the marriage pattern of deaf persons lined up with that of non-disabled persons and to see how experiences of disablement interacted with the environment in which persons dwelt. This article challenges the belief in a universal disability experience by arguing that although deaf individuals generally encountered more difficulties in finding a marriage partner, marriage chances were significantly dependent on personal characteristics such as gender, living environment and birth date. As such, we demonstrate that the relationship between being deaf and being vulnerable on the marriage market was not an inescapable one, but the product of specific environments.

  • 3.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Gardarsdottir, Olöf
    University of Iceland.
    Thorvaldsen, Gunnar
    Universitetet i Tromsö.
    Infant Mortality in the Nordic Countries 1780-19302008In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 457-485Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Engberg, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Boarded out by auction: poor children and their families in nineteenth-century northern Sweden2004In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 431-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boarding out and fostering poor children was a favoured method of poor relief in many rural areas in northern Europe. This article discusses children who were boarded out to foster-parents by public auction in a rural parish in northern nineteenth-century Sweden. Poverty was the main reason why children were boarded out, frequently associated with loss of parents and difficulties in providing for a large household. It is suggested that the Swedish system of boarding out poor children must be understood in the context of a welfare system where cost efficiency was important. The auction method was used in spite of the risks involved because it was considered to be the best way to provide poor children with food, clothes, shelter and care, while keeping the compensation to the foster-parents at a reasonably low level.

  • 5.
    Ericsson, Tom
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Like father, like daughter?: Intergenerational: social mobility among business and craftswomen in Sundsvall, Sweden, 1860–18932012In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 409-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using multiple sources, this study identifies women's intergenerational social mobility to a greater degree than most other studies on the topic. It examines the status of the fathers of women who ran a business or craft in a Swedish town that witnessed rapid urban industrial transformations. Whereas only 15 per cent of the businesswomen and 12 per cent of the craftswomen were the daughters of business- or craftsmen, the businesswomen in particular had through their trade been able to improve their social status. The results suggest that these women benefited from the commercial opportunities of their time and not from having a father in business.

  • 6.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Societal change and individual past in connection with crime: demographic perspectives on young people arrested in Northern Sweden in the Nineteenth Century2008In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 331-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the lives of criminal offenders prior to their incarceration in past time. Knowing the background of offenders, however, may explain why they broke the law. This article explores young offenders in the Sundsvall region of Sweden, 400 kilometres north of Stockholm, an area with a booming sawmill-based economy in nineteenth-century Sweden. First, using prison registers, large-scale structural concepts are employed to explain the increasing number of incarcerations of young people reported during the period 1840–1880. Second, to uncover the offenders' demographic backgrounds and their socio-economic circumstances when arrested, they are identified in Swedish parish registers digitized by the Demographic Data Base (DDB) at Umeå University. These sources permit the application of retrospective life-course perspectives that are increasingly applied in modern criminology. These perspectives show that offenders were not primarily migrants or of poor origin, but that they frequently came from the region. Thus their parents were often also present in the community. In providing informal social control these characteristics – being local and having at least one parent nearby – are thought to lead to lower levels of criminality and imprisonment, but they were of little effect in preventing crime or incarceration. This study thus challenges the view of the criminal in past time as a lone individual arrested in an unfamiliar settings. Among the few female offenders observed, however, these factors were more typical; although gender accounts for low levels of criminality, their isolation and poverty did lead some women to theft.

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