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  • 1.
    Grönlund, Anne
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    More control, less conflict?: job demand-control, gender and work-family conflict2007Ingår i: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 476-497Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The connection between working hours and work-to-family conflict has been established in a number of studies. However, it seems what is important is not only the quantity of work but also its quality, as captured by the job demand–control model. Survey data from 800 Swedish employees show that job demands spill over negatively into family life, while job control reduces work-to-family conflict. Interestingly, women in jobs with high demands and high control — regarded as the prototype for modern, flexible work life — do not experience more work-to-family conflict than men, even when working the same hours. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 2.
    Jansson, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Business Administration and Social Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Old dreams, new means: An exploration of visions and situated knowledges information technologies2007Ingår i: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 371-387Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the tensions and ambivalences of new and old technology and political visions of keeping viable, quality care and services for elderly citizens through the use of new information technologies. The visions of politicians and social service managers of keeping alive the welfare state and retaining its ability to offer quality care and services for elderly citizens are compared with the experiences of female care assistants and their expectations of technology. A feminist figure — the cyborg — will be used in this exploration. We consider how care assistants are integrated in networks of socio-technical relations between humans and non-humans, and the extent to which gender or asymmetrical power relations between women and men intervene in their stories.

  • 3.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Öun, Ida
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Self-Employment as a Strategy for Dealing with the Competing Demands of Work and Family? The Importance of Family/Lifestyle Motives2015Ingår i: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 22, nr 3, s. 256-272Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test the argument that self-employment may be a strategy for dealing with competing demands of work and family. We do this by comparing work–family conflict experienced by self-employed and employed men and women. By examining to what extent the selfemployed versus regularly employed value time for themselves and their family — i.e., whether they are driven by family/lifestyle motives in their working life — we examine whether selfemployment can help reduce work–family conflict among those guided by family/lifestyle motives. Using data from a 2011 Swedish survey of 2483 self-employed and 2642 regularly employed, the analyses indicate that experiences of work–family conflict differ between selfemployed and employees. Self-employed men and women, especially those with employees, generally experience more work–family conflict than do employees. However, self-employment can sometimes be a strategy for dealing with competing demands of work and family life. The presence of family/lifestyle motives generally decreases the probability of experiencing work–family conflict, particularly among self-employed women with employees.

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