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  • 1.
    Burman, Monica
    Umeå University.
    The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system2010In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 173-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of the Swedish Women’s Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.

  • 2.
    Edin, Kerstin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lalos, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    "Keeping up a front": narratives about intimate partner violence, pregnancy, and antenatal care2010In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 189-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nine women who had been subjected to severe intimate partner violence during pregnancy narrated their ambiguous and contradictory feelings and the various balancing strategies they used to overcome their complex and difficult situations. Because allowing anyone to come close posed a threat, the women mostly denied the situation and kept up a front to hide the violence from others. Three women disclosed ongoing violence to the midwives, but only one said such disclosure was helpful. This article highlights the complexity of being pregnant when living with an abusive partner and challenges antenatal care policies from the perspective of pregnant women.

  • 3. King, Elizabeth J.
    et al.
    Maman, Suzanne
    Namatovu, Fredinah
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kiwanuka, Deus
    Kairania, Robert
    Ssemanda, John B.
    Nalugoda, Fred
    Wagman, Jennifer A.
    Addressing intimate partner violence among female clients accessing HIV testing and counseling services: pilot testing tools in Rakai, Uganda2017In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 23, no 13, p. 1656-1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization recommends that HIV counseling and testing (HCT) programs implement strategies to address how intimate partner violence (IPV) influences women's ability to protect themselves from and seek care and treatment for HIV infection. We discuss the process used to adapt a screening and brief intervention (SBI) for female clients of HCT services in Rakai, Uganda-a setting with high prevalence of both HIV and IPV. By outlining our collaborative process for adapting and implementing the SBI in Rakai and training counselors for its use, we hope other HCT programs will consider replicating the approach in their settings.

  • 4. Niemi, Johanna
    et al.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The Nordic countries score high on gender equality rankings year after year2010In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 131-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Salazar, Mariano
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Valladares, Eliette
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The supportive process for ending intimate partner violence after pregnancy: the experience of nicaraguan women2012In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1257-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This grounded theory study found that Nicaraguan mothers exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy eventually acted to protect their children and themselves. They experienced ending abuse as an empowerment process characterized by a cognitive change in women's attitudes toward partner abuse and the emergence of help-seeking strategies that lead to ending violence with or without ending the relationship. This process was facilitated by a supportive environment that challenged abusive behaviors as well as being asked about abuse during their last pregnancy. Although environmental changes can facilitate ending abuse, Nicaragua's public institutions must be strengthened to reach women in need.

  • 6.
    Wagman, Jennifer A.
    et al.
    Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Namatovu, Fredinah
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nalugoda, Fred
    Rakai Health Sciences Program, Uganda.
    Kiwanuka, Deus
    Center for Domestic Violence Prevention, Uganda.
    Nakigozi, Gertrude
    Rakai Health Sciences Program, Uganda.
    Gray, Ron
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Wawer, Maria J.
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Serwadda, David
    Makerere University, Uganda.
    A public health approach to intimate partner violence prevention in Uganda: The SHARE project2012In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1390-1412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research from Rakai, Uganda, suggests intimate partner violence (IPV) is common and attitudes condoning it are widespread. We used a public health approach to develop and implement an evidence-based IPV prevention intervention named the Safe Homes and Respect for Everyone (SHARE) Project. SHARE was designed on the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change and adapted IPV prevention strategies from Raising Voices and Stepping Stones. SHARE was implemented in four regions of Rakai. This article describes the design and implementation of SHARE, provides details on strategies and activities used, discusses challenges and lessons learned, and provides recommendations for other violence prevention programmers.

  • 7.
    Wiklund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Malmgren-Olsson, Eva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Bengs, Carita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    "He messed me up": Swedish adolescent girls' experiences of gender-related partner violence and its consequences over time2010In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 207-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illuminates two Swedish adolescent girls' experiences of living in a violent relationship as teenagers and how this has affected their lives and health over time. Interviews were conducted in a youth health center. A combination of qualitative content analysis and narrative analysis describes violation, stress, trauma, coping, and agency during the period of adolescence and transition into adulthood. Despite Swedish progressive public policies on men's violence against women, teenage girls are exposed to male partners' violation, a severe gendered stressor. There is a need for the development of health policy and gender-responsive interventions geared specifically toward adolescent girls.

1 - 7 of 7
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