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  • 1.
    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Linguistic relativity and number2014In: Proceedings of the International Groups for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, ISSN 0771-100X, Vol. 2, p. 433-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linguistic relativity, the idea that language affects the way that people think, and that people who speak different languages think differently, has implications for mathematics education because people use different languages to teach, learn and practice mathematics. This paper reviews research on linguistic relativity and number, looking at languages with very few number words, languages with extensive and regular number systems and the order of composition of numbers. Linguistic relativity appears to involve memory more than perception. Linguistic relativity effects involving number need to be taken into account in designing mathematics education research.

  • 2.
    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris
    RMIT University, Australia.
    The everyday language of mathematics: Investigating spatial frames of reference in Iwaidja2010In: Proceedings of the International Groups for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, ISSN 0771-100X, Vol. 2, p. 321-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A project in a remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory of Australia is examining the everyday spatial language of the students and in particular their preferred frames of reference. This report on the early stages of the project finds that nationwide testing ignores the linguistic context of these students. Teachers have little curriculum support in teaching mathematics to Indigenous Language Speaking students. Using the tools and analyses of cognitive linguistics, this project will describe the spatial frames of reference of Iwaidja, an Indigenous language of northern Australia, and then apply the findings in an action research project in the Early Years classroom at the school in this remote community.

  • 3.
    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bino, Vagi
    University of Goroka, Papua New Guinea.
    Changes in expression when translating arithmetic word questions2015In: Proceedings of the International Groups for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, ISSN 0771-100X, Vol. 2, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching and assessing mathematics in Indigenous languages which do not have developed school mathematics registers may require teachers to translate word questions from a source language into their own language. Differences may occur between the source and the translation due to semantic and syntactic requirements of the target languages and for other reasons during the translation process. We present examples of some translations by teachers of word problems from English into languages of Central Province, Papua New Guinea. Even simple statements can contain multiple changes in translation. Some statements may be difficult or impossible to translate while retaining a comparable mathematical difficulty.

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