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  • 1.
    Grip, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Jull, Gwendolen
    Treleaven, Julia
    Head eye co-ordination and gaze stability using simultaneous measurement of eye in head and head in space movements: potential for use in subjects with a whiplash injury2009In: Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, ISSN 1387-1307, E-ISSN 1573-2614, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Describe reproducibility of a measurement method to investigate deficits in eye-head co-ordination.

    Methods. Combined recordings of head and eye rotation using wireless motion sensors and electro-oculography (EOG) were used as an initial step towards a method to quantify eye-head co-ordination deficits. Head rotation to the side during gaze fixation and sequential head and eye movements were studied on 20 asymptomatic control subjects and six subjects with chronic whiplash disorders. All included whiplash subjects reported eye disturbances according to a vision symptom questionnaire.

    Results. The trial-to-trial reproducibility was moderate to high for 24 of 28 variables (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient 0.44 to 0.87). Velocity gain (ratio of eye and head velocities) was on average close to unity in both groups. Head stability was high in control subjects, while three of six whiplash subjects demonstrated head instability during eye movement. Whiplash subjects also demonstrated a decreased range of head movement during gaze fixation and lower head velocities as compared with the asymptomatics.

    Conclusions. The method of combined head and eye motion appears to give accurate, repeatable measurements. Case studies of whiplash subjects indicated deficits in head eye co-ordination. The method could be useful in further clinical research into eye and head movement in those with neck disorders.

  • 2.
    Grip, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Jull, Gwendolen
    Treleaven, Julia
    Head eye co-ordination using simultaneous measurement of eye in head and head in space movements: potential for use in subjects with a whiplash injury.2009In: Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, ISSN 1387-1307, E-ISSN 1573-2614, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Describe reproducibility of a measurement method to investigate deficits in eye-head co-ordination. Methods. Combined recordings of head and eye rotation using wireless motion sensors and electro-oculography (EOG) were used as an initial step towards a method to quantify eye-head co-ordination deficits. Head rotation to the side during gaze fixation and sequential head and eye movements were studied on 20 asymptomatic control subjects and six subjects with chronic whiplash disorders. All included whiplash subjects reported eye disturbances according to a vision symptom questionnaire. Results. The trial-to-trial reproducibility was moderate to high for 24 of 28 variables (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient 0.44 to 0.87). Velocity gain (ratio of eye and head velocities) was on average close to unity in both groups. Head stability was high in control subjects, while three of six whiplash subjects demonstrated head instability during eye movement. Whiplash subjects also demonstrated a decreased range of head movement during gaze fixation and lower head velocities as compared with the asymptomatics. Conclusions. The method of combined head and eye motion appears to give accurate, repeatable measurements. Case studies of whiplash subjects indicated deficits in head eye co-ordination. The method could be useful in further clinical research into eye and head movement in those with neck disorders.

  • 3.
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Zakelis, Rolandas
    Bartusis, Laimonas
    Ragauskas, Arminas
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Can intracranial pressure be measured non-invasively bedside using a two-depth Doppler-technique?2017In: Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, ISSN 1387-1307, E-ISSN 1573-2614, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 459-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is necessary in many neurological and neurosurgical diseases. To avoid lumbar puncture or intracranial ICP probes, non-invasive ICP techniques are becoming popular. A recently developed technology uses two-depth Doppler to compare arterial pulsations in the intra- and extra-cranial segments of the ophthalmic artery for non-invasive estimation of ICP. The aim of this study was to investigate how well non-invasively-measured ICP and invasively-measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure correlate. We performed multiple measurements over a wide ICP span in eighteen elderly patients with communicating hydrocephalus. As a reference, an automatic CSF infusion apparatus was connected to the lumbar space. Ringer's solution was used to create elevation to pre-defined ICP levels. Bench tests of the infusion apparatus showed a random error (95 % CI) of less than ±0.9 mmHg and a systematic error of less than ±0.5 mmHg. Reliable Doppler signals were obtained in 13 (72 %) patients. An infusion test could not be performed in one patient. Thus, twelve patients and a total of 61 paired data points were studied. The correlation between invasive and non-invasive ICP measurements was good (R = 0.74), and the 95 % limits of agreements were -1.4 ± 8.8 mmHg. The within-patient correlation varied between 0.47 and 1.00. This non-invasive technique is promising, and these results encourage further development and evaluation before the method can be recommended for use in clinical practice.

  • 4.
    Lundgren, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Henriksson, Otto
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Kuklane, Kalev
    Holmér, Ingvar
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Validity and reliability of the Cold Discomfort Scale: a subjective judgement scale for the assessment of patient thermal state in a cold environment.2014In: Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, ISSN 1387-1307, E-ISSN 1573-2614, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 287-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complementary measures for the assessment of patient thermoregulatory state, such as subjective judgement scales, might be of considerable importance in field rescue scenarios where objective measures such as body core temperature, skin temperature, and oxygen consumption are difficult to obtain. The objective of this study was to evaluate, in healthy subjects, the reliability of the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), a subjective judgement scale for the assessment of patient thermal state in cold environments, defined as test-retest stability, and criterion validity, defined as the ability to detect a difference in cumulative cold stress over time. Twenty-two healthy subjects performed two consecutive trials (test-retest). Dressed in light clothing, the subjects remained in a climatic chamber set to -20 °C for 60 min. CDS ratings were obtained every 5 min. Reliability was analysed by test-retest stability using weighted kappa coefficient that was 0.84 including all the 5-min interval measurements. When analysed separately at each 5-min interval the weighted kappa coefficients were was 0.48-0.86. Criterion validity was analysed by comparing median CDS ratings of a moving time interval. The comparison revealed that CDS ratings were significantly increased for every interval of 10, 15, and 30 min (p < 0.001) but not for every interval of 5 min. In conclusion, in a prehospital scenario, subjective judgement scales might be a valuable measure for the assessment of patient thermal state. The results of this study indicated that, in concious patients, the CDS may be both reliable and valid for such purpose.

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