umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rentoft, Matilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Coates, Philip
    Tayside Tissue Bank/Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Wahlin, Ylva Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Autoantibodies and decreased expression of the transcription factor ELF-3 together with increased chemokine pathways support an autoimmune phenotype and altered differentiation in lichen planus located in oral mucosa2013In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 1410-1416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  The pathogenesis of oral lichen planus (OLP), a chronic inflammatory disease, is not fully understood. It is known that OLP has autoimmune features, and it is suggested to be an autoimmune disease. ELF-3 is involved in differentiation of keratinocytes and deregulated in different tumours and inflammatory diseases. CXCR-3 and its ligands CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 are increased in autoimmune diseases and linked to Th-1 immune response. Objectives  To analyse and compare expression of ELF-3, CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 in OLP lesions and controls in whole and microdissected epithelium. Methods  Tissue biopsies from 20 patients clinically and histologically diagnosed with OLP and 20 healthy controls were studied using whole tissues or microdissected epithelium. By the use of qRT-PCR, mRNA levels of ELF-3, CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 were studied. Western blot was used for analysis of ELF-3 protein expression. Sera from 19 OLP patients and 20 controls were analysed with ELISA in search for autoantibodies. Results  The upregulation of CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 found in OLP is similar to previous findings showing an autoimmune phenotype in lichen planus (LP) and lichen sclerosus. Decreased expression of the differentiation-related transcription factor ELF-3 was also seen in OLP lesions, and we further demonstrate presence of circulating autoantibodies against the ELF-3 protein in sera from 3 of 19 (16%) LP patients tested. Conclusions  On the basis of these findings, we confirm that OLP shows features of an autoimmune disease and suggest deregulated differentiation of keratinocytes to be one of the causes of the disease phenotype.

  • 2.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ebrahimi, Maijd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Increased levels of COX-2 in oral lichen planus supports an autoimmune cause of the disease2012In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1415-1419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease for which the pathogenesis is not fully understood. OLP has autoimmune features and auto immunity has been suggested as a potential cause, whereas WHO has classified OLP as a premalignant condition. Association between chronic inflammation and cancer is known and chronic inflammation is one of the characteristics of OLP. A protein connected to inflammation and suggested to be involved in cancer development is cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which can be inhibited by microRNA-26b (miR-26b).

    Objective: The aim was to map levels of COX-2 and miR-26b in OLP lesions to see if there was any correlation between expression of COX-2 and its regulator miR-26b in OLP.

    Methods: In biopsies from 20 OLP patients and 20 age and gender-matched controls laser- micro dissection of epithelium was performed. Quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used in the analysis.

    Results: Levels of COX-2 mRNA were significantly higher while levels of miR-26b were significantly lower in OLP lesions compared to controls. Using immunohistochemistry normal oral mucosa samples did not show any expression of COX-2 while OLP samples expressed the protein. No COX-2 protein was detectable with Western blot.

    Conclusion: Increased expression of COX-2 and decreased expression of miR-26b in OLP suggests both to play a role in OLP. COX-2 has been connected to both malignant development and autoimmunity but as malignant development of OLP is quite rare we suggest that the increased levels of COX-2 seen here support an autoimmune cause of the disease.

  • 3.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Prosthetic Dentistry.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Reply to increased levels of COX-2 and oral lichen planus by P.D. Pigatto, F. Spaderi, G.P. Bombeccari, G. Guzzi by Danielsson et al2013In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 395-396Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Gyllencreutz, J. Dahlen
    et al.
    Paoli, J.
    Bjellerup, M.
    Bucharbajeva, Zinaida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Gonzalez, H.
    Nielsen, K.
    Sandberg, C.
    Synnerstad, I.
    Terstappen, K.
    Wennberg Larko, A. -M
    Diagnostic agreement and interobserver concordance with teledermoscopy referrals2017In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 898-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMalignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers are among the fastest increasing malignancies in many countries. With the help of new tools, such as teledermoscopy referrals between primary health care and dermatology clinics, the management of these patients could be made more efficient. ObjectiveTo evaluate the diagnostic agreement and interobserver concordance achieved when assessing referrals sent through a mobile teledermoscopic referral system as compared to referrals sent via the current paper-based system without images. MethodsThe referral information from 80 teledermoscopy referrals and 77 paper referrals were evaluated by six Swedish dermatologists. They were asked to answer questions about the probable diagnosis, the priority, and a management decision. ResultsTeledermoscopy generally resulted in higher diagnostic agreement, better triaging and more malignant tumours being booked directly to surgery. The largest difference between the referral methods was seen for invasive melanomas. Referrals for benign lesions were significantly more often correctly resent to primary health care with teledermoscopy. However, referrals for cases of melanoma in situ were also incorrectly resent five times. The interobserver concordance was moderate with both methods. ConclusionBy adding clinical and dermoscopic images to referrals, the triage process for both benign and dangerous skin tumours can be improved. With teledermoscopy, patients with melanoma especially can receive treatment more swiftly.

  • 5.
    Hägg, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Sundström, A
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Decision for biological treatment in real life is more strongly associated with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) than with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI)2015In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 452-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following the establishment of the National Quality Registry for systemic psoriasis treatment (PsoReg), the two psoriasis outcome measurements, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), are now integrated in clinical practice in Sweden. According to current guidelines, the initiation of a biological treatment should depend on a combination of the physician's (PASI) and the patients' assessment of the disease impact on a health-related quality of life measure (DLQI).

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if either of the two measures, PASI or DLQI, is more strongly associated with initiation of biological therapy.

    METHODS: The study is based on 2216 patients suffering from moderate to severe psoriasis who were biological naïve at enrolment to PsoReg. The relationship between the two measures PASI and DLQI and initiation of biological treatment (as outcome) were estimated by a logistic regression and a Cox proportional hazard's model with combinations of PASI and DLQI as independent variables.

    RESULTS: The adjusted regression models showed that patients with high PASI score and low DLQI score had a higher chance to receive biological treatment compared to patients with low PASI score and high DLQI score.

    CONCLUSION: The decision to initiate biological treatment is more strongly associated with PASI than with DLQI. However, since the DLQI reflects both socio-economic costs and patient suffering better than PASI, the relevance of the DLQI may be underestimated in clinical practice.

  • 6.
    Jahns, Anika C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nosek, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Killasli, H.
    Emtestam, L.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Microbiology of folliculitis decalvans: a histological study of 37 patients2015In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 1025-1026Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nylander Lundqvist, Elisabet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Bergdahl, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Bergdahl, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psychological health in patients with genital and oral erosive lichen planus2006In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Erosive lichen planus is a severe, recurrent and recalcitrant disease that affects several mucosal areas, mostly the genital area and the mouth, but also, for example, the oesophagus and perianal area. The disease causes serious symptoms, because of the raw, de-epithelialized mucosa and healing with scars/adhesions, which affect the patient's life in many ways. It causes, for example, difficulties in eating, drinking and going to the bathroom. Treatment is complicated and, so far, few therapeutic drugs other than steroids have been reported. OBJECTIVES: As the disease has severe implications on the patient's life it is important to investigate the psychological health of the patients, as well as the influence of stress on their health and wellbeing, in order to improve treatment. STUDY DESIGN, SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-nine consecutive patients with erosive lichen planus were included during a 1-year period. The study was carried out as 'state-of-the-last-month', and stress, state anxiety, depression and 'erosive lichen planus factors', i.e. symptoms affecting daily life, were assessed. RESULTS: Eighty-seven per cent of the patients had symptoms, severely affecting daily life. Unexpectedly, oral symptoms seemed to be the most prominent. Our results showed that depression, anxiety and stress were more common in patients with erosive lichen planus than in a control group. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Erosive lichen planus is a severe disease with symptoms and complications affecting the patient's life. Our results indicate that their psychological health is also affected and emphasize the need for close collaboration between physicians, dentists with special knowledge in oral medicine and counsellors/psychologists to optimize handling of these patients.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf