umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bodén, Ida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Larsson, William
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Nilsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Forssell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    In vivo skin measurements with a novel probe head for simultaneous skin impedance and near-infrared spectroscopy2011In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 494-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/purpose: Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and skin impedance (IMP) measurements are useful techniques for objective diagnostics of various skin diseases. Here, we present a combined probe head for simultaneous, time-saving NIR spectroscopy and skin impedance measurements. The probe also ensures that both measurements are performed under equal conditions and at the same skin location.

    Methods: Finite element method simulations were performed for evaluation of the impedance. In vivo skin measurements were performed and combined NIR and impedance spectra were analysed by means of multivariate methods with respect to body location, age and gender. The classification rate was determined by a planar discriminant analysis. Reproducibility was investigated by calculation of scatter values and statistical significance between overlapping groups was assessed by the calculation of intra-model distances, q.

    Results: The novel probe yielded rapid reproducible results and was easy to manage. Significant differences between skin locations and to a lesser extent age groups and gender were demonstrated.

    Conclusion: With the novel probe, statistically significant differences between overlapping classes in score plots can be confirmed by calculating intra-model distances. The influence of molecular differences in the skin at different body locations is larger than the influence of gender or age and therefore relevant reference measurements are discussed.

  • 2.
    Bodén, Ida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Nyström, Josefina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry.
    Geladi, Paul
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    NIR and skin impedance spectroscopic measurements for studying the effect of coffee and alcohol on skin, and dysplastic naevi2012In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 486-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/purpose: Near infrared (NIR) and impedance spectroscopy can be used for clinical skin measurements and need to be evaluated for possible confounding factors; (a) are skin conditions of the patient and the subsequent skin measurements influenced by alcohol and/or coffee consumption and (b) are measurements of dysplastic naevi (DN) reproducible over time and significantly different compared to reference skin.

    Methods: NIR and skin impedance spectroscopic data were analysed multivariately. In the first study, the skin characteristics of 15 healthy individuals were examined related to body location, gender, individual differences, and consumption of coffee or alcohol. The second study included five patients diagnosed with dysplastic naevi syndrome (DNS). Measurements were taken on DN and reference skin over time.

    Results: In the first study, body location and gender had a major influence on measurement scores. Inter-individual skin characteristics and coffee or alcohol effects on skin characteristics were of minor importance. In the second study, it was shown that DN can be differentiated from reference skin and the measurements are stable over time.

    Conclusions: Moderate consumption of alcohol and coffee did not influence the results of the measurements. It is possible to follow, stable or changed, characteristics of DN over time.

  • 3.
    Bodén, Ida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nyström, Josefina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zazo, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Geladi, Paul
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Non-invasive identification of melanoma with near-infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy2013In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 19, no 1, p. e473-e478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/purpose: An early diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma is of high importance for good prognosis. An objective, non-invasive instrument could improve the diagnostic accuracy of melanoma and decrease unnecessary biopsies. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of Near infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy in combination as a tool to distinguish between malignant and benign skin tumours.

    Methods: Near infrared and skin impedance spectra were collected in vivo on 50 naevi or suspect melanomas prior to excision. Received data was analysed with multivariate techniques and the results were compared to histopathology analyses of the tumours. A total of 12 cutaneous malignant melanomas, 19 dysplastic naevi and 19 benign naevi were included in the study.

    Results: The observed sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were 83% and 95%, respectively, for malignant melanoma.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that the combination of near infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy is a promising tool for non-invasive diagnosis of suspect cutaneous malignant melanomas. 

  • 4. Hägerlind, E
    et al.
    Falk, M
    Löfstedt, T
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bodén, I
    Near infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy: a possible support in the diagnostic process of skin tumours in primary health care2015In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 493-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/purpose: The global incidence of skin cancer has increased drastically in recent decades, especially in Australia and Northern Europe. Early detection is crucial for good prognosis and high survival rates. In general, primary care physicians have considerably lower sensitivity and specificity rates for detection of skin cancer, compared to dermatologists. A probable main reason for this is that current diagnostic tools are subjective in nature, and therefore diagnostic skills highly depend on experience. Illustratively, in Sweden, approximately 155500 benign skin lesions are excised unnecessarily every year. An objective instrument, added to the clinical examination, might improve the diagnostic accuracy, and thus promote earlier detection of malignant skin tumours, as well as reduce medical costs associated with unnecessary biopsies and excisions. The general aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of the combination of near infrared (NIR) and skin impedance spectroscopy as a supportive tool in the diagnosis and evaluation of skin tumours in primary health care. Methods: Near infrared and skin impedance data were collected by performing measurements on suspect malignant, premalignant and benign tumours in the skin of patients seeking primary health care for skin tumour evaluation. The obtained data were analysed using multivariate analysis and compared with the diagnosis received by the conventional diagnostic process. Results: The observed sensitivity and specificity rates were both 100%, when discriminating malignant and premalignant skin tumours from benign skin tumours, and the observed sensitivity and specificity for separating malignant skin tumours from premalignant and benign skin tumours were also 100%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the NIR and skin impedance spectroscopy may be a useful supportive tool for the general practitioner in the diagnosis and evaluation of skin tumours in primary health care, as a complement to the visual assessment.

  • 5.
    Nyström, Josefina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Geladi, Paul
    Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry, SLU Röbäcksdalen, Umeå, Sweden, .
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Rattfelt, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Svensk, Ann-Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Franzén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Objective measurements of radiotherapy-induced erythema2004In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 242-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims: The development of acute radiation erythema is a common phenomenon among patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment. Because of the absence of reliable objective classification methods, the degree of skin reaction can at present mainly be judged subjectively in the clinic. This has motivated the present preliminary study, concerning the first steps in the development of an objective method for skin reaction classification.

    Methods: Three non-invasive techniques were used: near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, laser Doppler perfusion imaging and digital photography. The NIR spectra were analysed with principal component analysis (PCA), and the results from the other two with traditional univariate methods. Measurements were made on breast cancer patients who had been exposed to different irradiation doses. A total of 28 breast cancer patients participated one to three times each; 12 were treated with photons at 4 or 6 MeV and 16 were treated with high-energy electrons between 10 and 20 MeV to a maximum dose of 50 Gy.

    Results: PCA of NIR spectra shows that information on radiation dose lies mainly in the first principal component. It is observed that the higher the dose the higher the score value. The results from the laser Doppler measurements show that in 79% of the cases the perfusion increases significantly with radiation dose. Analysis of the digital photography shows that a proposed skin redness index (SRI), increases with a higher radiation dose. However, the increase in most cases is not significant. By combining all data, correlation to radiation doses was seen for 74% of the patients who participated more than once.

    Conclusion: All three non-invasive methods correlate with the radiation dose but to various degrees. NIR spectroscopy, laser Doppler and a combination of the three techniques are the most promising methods for characterising erythema

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf