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  • 1.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Danielsson, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    No difference in symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome between healthy subjects and patients with recurrent depression in remission2007In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 896-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is bidirectional comorbidity between anxiety/depression and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To investigate the prevalence of IBS symptoms, and factors associated with gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with recurrent depressive disorder. Patients (n = 95) with recurrent type of major depression according to DSM-IV criteria and sex- and age-matched controls (n = 190) were sent questionnaires investigating symptoms of IBS [Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS)-IBS] and symptoms of anxiety and depression [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)]. Medical records were checked over a 10-year period for chronic somatic symptoms or diseases. Seventy-three patients with unipolar disorder (mean age 63.6 years SD 13.8; range 23–86 years) and 156 controls (mean age 59.2 years SD 11.6, range 21–85 years) responded. Patients with recurrent depression had higher GSRS-IBS scores and showed a strong correlation between symptoms of IBS and anxiety-depression (rs = 0.54; P < 0.001). IBS symptoms were also associated with multiple pain symptoms, higher health-seeking behaviour and selective-serotonin-reuptake inhibitor intake. However, patients with recurrent depression (n = 46) in remission (HADS-Depression score <8) did not have more symptoms of IBS than controls (GSRS-IBS median score 6.0 vs 6.5; P = 0.46). There is a strong association between symptoms of IBS and symptoms of anxiety and depression, whereas depressive patients in remission do not have more IBS symptoms than controls.

  • 2.
    Wixner, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rydh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Hornsten, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gastric emptying in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis: the impact of autonomic neuropathy2012In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1111-e568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are common in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis and an autonomic dysfunction has been considered to explain these symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of autonomic neuropathy on gastric emptying in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis and to relate these findings to nutritional status, GI symptoms, gender, and age at disease onset.

    Methods: Gastric emptying was evaluated with gastric emptying scintigraphy. Spectral analysis of the heart rate variability and cardiovascular responses after tilt test were used to assess the autonomic function. The nutritional status was evaluated with the modified body mass index (s-albumine x BMI).

    Key Results: Gastric retention was found in about one-third of the patients. A weak correlation was found between the scintigraphic gastric emptying rate and both the sympathetic (rs = -0.397, P < 0.001) and parasympathetic function (rs = -0.282, P = 0.002). The gastric emptying rate was slower in those with lower or both upper and lower GI symptoms compared with those without symptoms (median T50 123 vs 113 min, P = 0.042 and 192 vs 113 min, P = 0.003, respectively). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that age of onset (OR 0.10, CI 0.020.52) and sympathetic dysfunction (OR 0.23, CI 0.100.51), but not gender (OR 0.76, CI 0.311.84) and parasympathetic dysfunction (OR 1.81, CI 0.724.56), contributed to gastric retention.

    Conclusions and Inferences: Gastric retention is common in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis early after onset. Autonomic neuropathy only weakly correlates with gastric retention and therefore additional factors must be involved.

  • 3.
    Wixner, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Törnblom, H.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lindberg, G.
    Abnormal small bowel motility in patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis2018In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 30, no 9, article id e13354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrointestinal complications are common in hereditary transthyretin amyloid (ATTRm) amyloidosis. The underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, and the patients' small bowel function remains largely unexplored. The aim of the present study was to compare the small bowel motility in ATTRm amyloidosis patients with that in non-amyloidosis patient controls.

    Methods: ATTRm amyloidosis patients undergoing evaluation for liver transplantation were consecutively investigated with 24-hour duodenojejunal manometry (n=19). The somatostatin analogue octreotide was used to induce fasting motility. Patients with age at onset of 50years were defined as late-onset cases. For each patient, three age- and sex-matched patient controls (n=57) were selected from the total pool of investigated patients.

    Key Results: Manometry was judged as abnormal in 58% of the patients and in 26% of the patient controls (P=.01). Patients displayed significantly more daytime phase III migrating motor complexes than patient controls (median 4 vs 2, P<.01), and had a higher frequency of low-amplitude complexes (16% vs 4%; however, this difference did not reach statistical significance, P=.10). Furthermore, late-onset patients showed a delay in octreotide response (5.4 vs 3.8minutes, P<.01), but this was not observed for early-onset patients or within the control group.

    Conclusions and Inferences: Patients with ATTRm amyloidosis displayed abnormalities in their small bowel motility more frequently than non-amyloidosis patient controls, and the manometric pattern was probably best consistent with a combined neuromyopathic disorder. The delayed octreotide response in late-onset patients warrants further investigation.

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