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  • 1.
    Krachler, Benno
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Reality-check in physical activity promotion: self-report-based guidelines vs. measurement-based estimates2016In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 91, p. 395-396Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Long, G H
    et al.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Fhärm, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Griffin, S J
    Simmons, R K
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Healthy behaviours and 10-year incidence of diabetes: a population cohort study2015In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 71, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between meeting behavioural goals and diabetes incidence over 10years in a large, representative Swedish population.

    METHODS: Population-based prospective cohort study of 32,120 individuals aged 35 to 55years participating in a health promotion intervention in Västerbotten County, Sweden (1990 to 2013). Participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, clinical measures, and completed diet and activity questionnaires. Poisson regression quantified the association between achieving six behavioural goals at baseline - body mass index (BMI) <25kg/m(2), moderate physical activity, non-smoker, fat intake <30% of energy, fibre intake ≥15g/4184kJ and alcohol intake ≤20g/day - and diabetes incidence over 10years.

    RESULTS: Median interquartile range (IQR) follow-up time was 9.9 (0.3) years; 2211 individuals (7%) developed diabetes. Only 4.4% of participants met all 6 goals (n=1245) and compared to these individuals, participants meeting 0/1 goals had a 3.74 times higher diabetes incidence (95% confidence interval (CI)=2.50 to 5.59), adjusting for sex, age, calendar period, education, family history of diabetes, history of myocardial infarction and long-term illness. If everyone achieved at least four behavioural goals, 14.1% (95% CI: 11.7 to 16.5%) of incident diabetes cases might be avoided.

    CONCLUSION: Interventions promoting the achievement of behavioural goals in the general population could significantly reduce diabetes incidence.

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  • 3. Travier, Noemie
    et al.
    Agudo, Antonio
    May, Anne M.
    Gonzalez, Carlos
    Luan, Jian'an
    Wareham, Nick J.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    van den Berg, Saskia W.
    Slimani, Nadia
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Norat, Teresa
    Romaguera, Dora
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Huerta, Jose M.
    Key, Tim J.
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Naska, Androniki
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Rohrmann, Sabina
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Bergmann, Manuela M.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Lindkvist, Bjorn
    Jakobsen, Mariane U.
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Lund, Eiliv
    Braaten, Toni
    Odysseos, Andreani
    Riboli, Elio
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Longitudinal changes in weight in relation to smoking cessation in participants of the EPIC-PANACEA study2012In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 54, no 3-4, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. We assessed the association between smoking cessation and prospective weight change in the European population of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of smoking. Eating out of home And obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Methods. The study involved more than 300,000 healthy volunteers, recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 9 European countries, who provided data on anthropometry and smoking habits at baseline and after a follow-up of 5 years on average. Adjusted mixed-effects linear regression models were used to obtain sex-specific summary estimates of the association between the change in smoking status and the annual change in weight. Results. Smoking cessation tends to be followed by weight gain; when compared to stable smokers, annual weight gain was higher in men (0.44 kg (95%CI: 0.36; 0.52)) and women (0.46 kg (95%CI: 0.41; 0.52)) who stopped smoking during follow-up. When smokers who stopped smoking at least 1 year before recruitment were compared to never smokers, no major differences in annual weight gain were observed. The excess weight gain following smoking cessation appears to mainly occur in the first years following the cessation. Conclusions. When considering the benefits of smoking cessation, such findings strengthen the need for promoting cessation offering information on weight gain control and support to weight-concerned smokers in order to remove a barrier to quitting. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 4. Travier, Noémie
    et al.
    Agudo, Antonio
    May, Anne M
    Gonzalez, Carlos
    Luan, Jian'an
    Besson, Hervé
    Wareham, Nick J
    Slimani, Nadia
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Palli, Domenico
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Sanchez, Maria-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Tormo, Maria-José
    Norat, Teresa
    Mouw, Traci
    Key, Tim J
    Spencer, Elizabeth A
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Vrieling, Alina
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Naska, Ada
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Rohrmann, Sabina
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    M Bergmann, Manuela
    Boeing, Heiner
    Hallmans, Goran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Lindkvist, Björn
    Jakobsen, Mariane Uhre
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Lund, Eiliv
    Braaten, Toni
    Odysseos, Andreani
    Riboli, Elio
    Peeters, Petra H
    Smoking and body fatness measurements: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-PANACEA study2009In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 365-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The present study investigates the cross-sectional relationship between tobacco smoking and body fatness.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 469,543 men and women who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study between 1992 and 2000 providing anthropometric measurements and information on smoking. Adjusted multilevel mixed-effects linear regression models were used to assess the association between smoking and body fat mass.

    Results: The analyses showed that BMI and WC were positively associated with smoking intensity in current smokers but negatively associated with time since quitting in former smokers. When compared to never smokers, average current smokers (17 and 13 cig/day for men and women, respectively) showed a lower BMI. When average former smokers (men and women who had stopped smoking for 16 and 15 years, respectively) were compared to never smokers, higher BMI and WC were observed in men, whereas no significant associations were observed in women.

    Conclusions: This cross-sectional study suggests that smoking may be associated with body fatness and fat distribution. Although our findings cannot establish cause and effect, they suggest that providing information and support to those who want to stop may help in preventing weight gain and therefore weaken a barrier against stopping smoking.

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