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  • 1. Hin, Harold
    et al.
    Clarke, Robert
    Sherliker, Paul
    Atoyebi, Wale
    Emmens, Kathleen
    Birks, Jacqueline
    Schneede, Joern
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Ueland, Per M
    Nexo, Ebba
    Scott, John
    Molloy, Anne
    Donaghy, Michael
    Frost, Chris
    Evans, John Grimley
    Clinical relevance of low serum vitamin B12 concentrations in older people: the Banbury B12 study2006In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 416-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: low vitamin B12 concentrations are common in older people, but the clinical relevance of biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency in the absence of anaemia is uncertain.

    Objective: to examine associations of cognitive impairment, depression and neuropathy with blood measurements of vitamin B12 and folate status in older people.

    Design: cross-sectional study in general practice in Banbury, England.

    Participants: a total of 1,000 individuals aged 75 years or older living in the community.

    Results: low vitamin B12 concentrations were identified in 13% of older people and were associated with memory impairment and depression. After adjustment for age, sex and smoking, individuals with vitamin B12 or holotranscobalamin (holoTC) in the bottom compared with top quartiles had a 2-fold risk (OR = 2.17; 95% CI 1.11-4.27) and a 3-fold risk (OR = 3.02; 95% CI 1.31-6.98) of cognitive impairment, respectively. Low vitamin B12 status was also associated with missing ankle tendon jerks but not with depression. Treatment with vitamin B12 for 3 months corrected the biochemical abnormalities but had no effect on any of the clinical measurements.

    Conclusions: low vitamin B12 concentrations are associated with cognitive impairment and missing ankle tendon jerks in older people in the absence of anaemia. Large-scale trials of vitamin B12 supplementation are required to assess the clinical significance of these associations.

  • 2.
    Hägglund, Patricia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Speech and Language Therapy.
    Hägg, Mary
    Wester, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Levring Jäghagen, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Effects of oral neuromuscular training on swallowing dysfunction among older people in intermediate care: a cluster randomized, controlled trial2019In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 48, p. 533-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: this prospective, cluster randomised, controlled trial investigated the effect of oral neuromuscular training among older people in intermediate care with impaired swallowing.

    Methods: older people (≥65 years) with swallowing dysfunction were cluster randomised according to care units for 5 weeks of neuromuscular training of the orofacial and pharyngeal muscles or usual care. The primary endpoint was the change in swallowing rate (assessed with a timed water swallow test) from baseline to the end-of-treatment and 6 months post-treatment. The secondary endpoints were changes in signs of aspiration during the water swallow test, and swallowing-related quality of life (QOL). An intention-to-treat principle was followed, and mixed-effects models were used for data analysis with the clustered study design as a random factor.

    Results: in total, 385 participants from 36 intermediate care units were screened, and 116 participants were randomly assigned to oral neuromuscular training (intervention; n = 49) or usual care (controls; n = 67). At the end of treatment, the geometric mean of the swallowing rate in the intervention group had significantly improved 60% more than that of controls (P = 0.007). At 6 months post-treatment, the swallowing rate of the intervention group remained significantly better (P = 0.031). Signs of aspiration also significantly reduced in the intervention group compared with controls (P = 0.01). No significant between-group differences were found for swallowing-related QOL.

    Conclusions: oral neuromuscular training is a new promising swallowing rehabilitation method among older people in intermediate care with impaired swallowing.

    Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02825927.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Increased postural sway during quiet stance as a risk factor for prospective falls in community-dwelling elderly individuals2017In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 964-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: fall-related injuries constitute major health risks in older individuals, and these risks are projected to increase in parallel with increasing human longevity. Impaired postural stability is a potential risk factor related to falls, although the evidence is inconclusive, partly due to the lack of prospective studies. This study aimed to investigate how objective measures of postural sway predict incident falls.

    Design, setting and participants: this prospectively observational study included 1,877 community-dwelling individuals aged 70 years who participated in the Healthy Ageing Initiative between June 2012 and December 2015.

    Measurements: postural sway was measured during eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) trials using the Wii Balance Board. Functional mobility, muscle strength, objective physical activity and cognitive performance were also measured. Participants reported incident falls 6 and 12 months after the examination.

    Results: during follow-up, 255 (14%) prospective fallers were identified. Division of centre of pressure (COP) sway lengths into quintiles revealed a nonlinear distribution of falls for EO trial data, but not EC trial data. After adjustment for multiple confounders, fall risk was increased by 75% for participants with COP sway lengths ≥400 mm during the EO trial (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-2.79), and approximately doubled for sway lengths ≥920 mm during the EC trial (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.12-3.22).

    Conclusion: objective measures of postural sway independently predict incident falls in older community-dwelling men and women. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether postural sway length is of interest for the prediction of incident falls in clinical settings.

  • 4. Jónsson, Pálmi V
    et al.
    Finne-Soveri, Harriet
    Jensdóttir, Anna B
    Ljunggren, Gunnar
    Bucht, Gösta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Grue, Else V
    Noro, Anja
    Björnson, Jan
    Jonsén, Elizabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Schroll, Marianne
    Co-morbidity and functional limitation in older patients underreported in medical records in Nordic Acute Care Hospitals when compared with the MDS-AC instrument2006In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 434-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SIR—Older persons are characterised by age-related changes, multiple diseases, multiple drug use and functional deficits. For optimal care, a holistic approach is needed; however, the health care systems of today are still essentially organised to provide acute medical care to relatively younger populations with little or no co-morbidity [ 1]. Health systems will have to adapt to this new situation.

    The value of geriatric assessment has been proven, where targeting is the key to success [ 2]. With shorter hospital stays, it is of importance to do this targeting quickly and effectively. According to a systematic literature review in the older patients, the most important predictors for adverse outcomes of acute care (mortality, frequent readmissions, institutionalisation and long length of stay) are current illness, decline in physical functions and age. In addition, illness severity, co-morbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive decline, poor nutrition and gender are predictive for one or more of the outcomes [ 3].

    The Minimum Data Set for Acute Care (MDS-AC) instrument was developed to guide care within the hospital and to facilitate the transfer and sharing of information to the next provider of care, thus supporting integrated care. The MDS-AC instrument provides an opportunity to systematically collect information that is reliable on function and co-morbidity and could thus be a valuable addition to the future electronic medical record [ 4].

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what degree important predictors of adverse outcomes, if present according to the MDS-AC instrument during the first 24 h of care for older patients, were not documented in traditional hospital records in acute care wards in five Nordic countries. Hence, the MDS-AC information is assumed to be a gold standard. A secondary aim is to show that suspected deficient documentation is an international issue.

  • 5.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Geriatrik.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Kallin, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Geriatrik.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Geriatrik.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Geriatrik.
    Poor staff awareness of analgesic treatment jeopardises adequate pain control in the care of older people2006In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 257-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: undertreatment of pain is a common problem in geriatric care. The aim of this study was to compare the caring staff 's answers concerning the resident's pain treatment with actual pharmacological pain treatment in a cross-sectional survey of the geriatric care population in the county of Vasterbotten, Sweden. Methods: a cross-sectional study in all geriatric care units in the county of Vasterbotten, Sweden, including 3,724 inhabitants aged 65 years and over. The mean age was 83.3 and the number of cognitively impaired 2,047 (55.0%). Medication data were obtained from prescription records. The member of staff who knew the resident best judged their pain based on observations the preceding week. Results: the reported pain prevalence in the sample was 56.7%. Of those residents reported to suffer from pain, 27.9% received no analgesics as regular medication. In 72.7% of those cases with reported pain and no pharmacological treatment, the staff member who knew the resident best still thought that the resident was receiving treatment for her/his pain. Conclusion: a large proportion of the old people in geriatric care settings suffer from pain, and undertreatment of pain appears to be a significant problem. Even when the resident was not receiving pharmacological treatment for their pain, the assessor, who was expected to know the resident best, still believed in a majority of cases that the resident was receiving treatment. This highlights the need for better communication between the various professional categories involved in geriatric care.

  • 6.
    Mathillas, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Increasing prevalence of dementia among very old people2011In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 243-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: it is unknown whether the age-specific prevalence of dementia among the very old changes over time.

    METHODS: this study compares the prevalence of dementia in two population-based cross-sectional samples of very old people in northern Sweden in 2000-02 and in 2005-07. In total, 430 individuals aged 85 and older (mean age 89.5 years, 71.4% women) were evaluated for dementia in the first cross-section and 465 individuals (mean age 90.2 years, 70.9% women) in the second. Trained assessors performed assessments and interviews during home visits and collected information from carers, relatives and medical records. Dementia was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria.

    RESULTS: the prevalence of dementia in the total sample was 26.5% in 2000-02 and 37.2% in 2005-07 (P = 0.001). There was also an increase in the prescription of different antihypertensive agents, antilipemic agents and choline esterase inhibitors, and more people had had heart surgery in the later sample.

    CONCLUSIONS: in this sample of very old people, an increase in the age-specific prevalence of dementia was detected over 5 years. Possible reasons for this may be extended survival among individuals with risk factors for dementia and among individuals with established dementia.

  • 7.
    Niklasson, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hörnsten, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Conradsson, Mia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nyqvist, Fredrica
    Mental Health Promotion Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Vaasa, Finland.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    High morale is associated with increased survival in the very old2015In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 630-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: high morale is defined as future-oriented optimism. Previous research suggests that a high morale independently predicts increased survival among old people, though very old people have not been specifically studied.

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate whether high morale is associated with increased survival among very old people.

    SUBJECTS: the Umeå 85+/GErontological Regional DAtabase-study (GERDA) recruited participants aged 85 years and older in northern Sweden and western Finland during 2000-02 and 2005-07, of whom 646 were included in this study.

    METHODS: demographic, functional- and health-related data were collected in this population-based study through structured interviews and assessments carried out during home visits and from reviews of medical records. The 17-item Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) was used to assess morale.

    RESULTS: the 5-year survival rate was 31.9% for participants with low morale, 39.4% for moderate and 55.6% for those with high morale. In an unadjusted Cox model, the relative risk (RR) of mortality was higher among participants with low morale (RR = 1.86, P < 0.001) and moderate morale (RR = 1.59, P < 0.001) compared with participants with high morale. Similar results were found after adjustment for age and gender. In a Cox model adjusted for several demographic, health- and function-related confounders, including age and gender, mortality was higher among participants with low morale (RR = 1.36, P = 0.032) than those with high morale. There was a similar but non-significant pattern towards increased mortality in participants with moderate morale (RR = 1.21, P value = 0.136).

    CONCLUSION: high morale is independently associated with increased survival among very old people.

  • 8.
    Nordin, Ellinor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Jensen, Jane
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Prognostic validity of the Timed Up-and-Go test, a modified Get Up-and-Go test, staff's global judgement and fall history in evaluating fall risk in residential care facilities2008In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 442-448Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Decreased mortality during inpatient care in The Netherlands: what are the keys to further improve health care for elderly patients?2016In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 4-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Stenvall, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Elinge, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Having had a hip fracture: association with dependency among the oldest old2005In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 294-297Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Stenzelius, Karin
    et al.
    Molander, Ulla
    Odeberg, Jenny
    Hammarström, Margareta
    Franzen, Karin
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    The effect of conservative treatment of urinary incontinence among older and frail older people: a systematic review2015In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 736-744Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: urinary incontinence (UI) is a common symptom among older people, with a higher prevalence among frail older persons living in nursing homes. Despite consequences such as reduced health and quality of life, many older people do not seek help for their symptoms, resulting in missed opportunity for treatment. Objective: the aim of this study was to investigate the evidence and the effect of conservative treatment of UI and the quality of life among older and frail older persons. Methods: a systematic review of randomised controlled studies and prospective, non-randomised studies was conducted, evaluating interventions of conservative treatment of UI in an older population (65 years or older). A total of 23 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 9 were of high or moderate quality. Fourteen studies were of low quality and were therefore excluded from the analysis. Results: documented and effective conservative treatments are available even for older persons with UI. Pelvic muscle exercise, physical training in combination with ADL, prompted voiding and attention training, and help to toilet are important treatments. In some studies, however, the evidence of effectiveness is limited. Conclusions: this systematic review concludes that there are conservative treatments for UI for older and frail older persons that reduce leakage and increase quality of life. There is however a need for further high-quality studies.

  • 12.
    Toss, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Wiklund, Peder
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Body composition and mortality risk in later life2012In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 677-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: body mass index is used widely to define overweight and obesity. Both high and low body mass indices are associated with increased mortality risk during middle age, but the relationship is less clear in later life. Thus, studies on the relationships between other aspects of body composition and mortality among older subjects are needed.

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate associations between different aspects of body composition and mortality in older people.

    METHODS: the study population comprised 921 participants aged ≥65 years who underwent dual-energy X-ray (DXA) absorptiometric examination at the Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University. The main reason for admission was clinical suspicion of osteoporosis. Total, abdominal and gynoid fat masses and lean body mass were measured by DXA absorptiometry at baseline, and the cohort was followed (mean duration, 9.2 years) for mortality events.

    RESULTS: during follow-up, 397 participants died. Lean mass was associated negatively with mortality in men and women (P < 0.001). Total fat mass showed a U-shaped association with mortality in men (P < 0.01) and a negative association in women (P < 0.01). A higher ratio of abdominal to gynoid fat mass increased mortality risk in women (P = 0.04), but not in men (P = 0.91).

    CONCLUSIONS: lean mass is associated strongly with survival in older subjects. Greater fat mass is protective in older women, whereas very low or very high fat mass increases the risk of death in men. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying these associations.

  • 13.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rönnmark, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Gustavsson, Janna M C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nygren, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Morale in the oldest old: the Umeå 85+ study2005In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 249-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to describe morale among the oldest old, and to investigate which social, functional and medical factors are associated with morale in this population. DESIGN: a cross-sectional study. SETTING: a population-based study in the municipality of Umeå, a city in Northern Sweden. SUBJECTS: half of the 85-year-old population, and the total population of 90-year-olds and > or = 95-year-olds (95-103) were asked to participate (n = 319) and 238 were interviewed. METHODS: structured interviews and assessments during home visits, interviews with relatives and caregivers and review of medical charts. The 17-item Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) was used to measure morale. Participants were assessed with the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Index, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and a symptom questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to find independent factors to explain the variation in the PGCMS score. RESULTS: eighty-four per cent (n = 199) of those interviewed answered the PGCMS. Three-quarters had middle range or high morale. GDS score, type of housing, previous stroke, loneliness and number of symptoms, adjusted for age group and sex, explained 49.3% of the variance of total PGCMS score. CONCLUSIONS: a large proportion of the oldest old had high morale. The most important factors for high morale were the absence of depressive symptoms, living in ordinary housing, having previously had a stroke and yet still living in ordinary housing, not feeling lonely and low number of symptoms. The PGCMS seems applicable in the evaluation of morale among the oldest old.

  • 14.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Department of Psychology.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Shorter telomere length is linked to brain atrophy and white matter hyperintensities2014In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 212-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: leukocyte telomere length (TL) is considered a marker of biological aging. Several studies have investigated the link between leukocyte TL and aging-associated functional attributes of the brain, but no prior study has investigated whether TL can be linked to brain atrophy and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs); two prominent structural manifestations of brain aging. Methods: we investigated whether leukocyte TL was related to brain atrophy and WMHs in a sample of 102 non-demented individuals aged 64-75 years. Results: shorter TL was related to greater degree of subcortical atrophy (beta = -0.217, P = 0.034), but not to cortical atrophy. Furthermore, TL was 371 bp shorter (P = 0.041) in participants exhibiting subcortical WMHs, and 552 bp shorter (P = 0.009) in older participants exhibiting periventricular WMHs. Conclusion: this study provides the first evidence of leukocyte TL being associated with cerebral subcortical atrophy and WMHs, lending further support to the concept of TL as a marker of biological aging, and in particular that of the aging brain.

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