umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sjöström, Lars-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Dysregulation of subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow in overweight postmenopausal women2010In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 365-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: A putative link between abdominal obesity and metabolic-vascular complications after menopause may be due to a decreased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF). The present work aimed to analyze possible changes in ATBF with being overweight and menopausal and its putative link to endothelial dysfunction and autonomic nervous system balance.

    METHODS: Forty-three healthy women were classified into four groups according to weight and menopause status. The ATBF was measured by xenon washout while fasting and after oral glucose intake. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine was used as a marker of endothelial function and heart rate variability-estimated autonomic nervous system activity.

    RESULTS: Fasting ATBF was decreased in both overweight groups (P = 0.044 and P = 0.048) versus normal-weight premenopausal women. Normal-weight and overweight postmenopausal women exhibited lower maximum ATBF compared with normal-weight premenopausal women (P = 0.015 and P = 0.001, respectively), and overweight postmenopausal women exhibited lower maximum ATBF compared with normal-weight postmenopausal women (P = 0.003). A negative correlation was found between fasting ATBF and asymmetric dimethylarginine (P = 0.015), whereas maximum ATBF was negatively associated with sympathetic-parasympathetic nervous system balance (ratio of the power of the low frequency to the power of the high frequency; P = 0.002).

    CONCLUSIONS: Loss of ATBF flexibility in overweight postmenopausal women may contribute to the metabolic dysfunction seen in this group of women.

  • 2.
    Bixo, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Reply2006In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 538-538Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Carrasquilla, German D.
    et al.
    Chiavenna, Chiara
    Bottai, Matteo
    Magnusson, Patrik K.
    Santacatterina, Michele
    Wolk, Alicja
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Engstrom, Gunnar
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Berglund, Anita
    Leander, Karin
    The association between menopausal hormone therapy and coronary heart disease depends on timing of initiation in relation to menopause onset. Results based on pooled individual participant data from The Combined Cohorts of Menopausal Women - Studies of Register Based Health Outcomes in Relation to Hormonal Drugs (COMPREHEND) study2015In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 1373-1373Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    et al.
    Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping.
    Bixo, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén
    Department of Woman and Child Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping.
    A randomized controlled study of taper-down or abrupt discontinuation of hormone therapy in women treated for vasomotor symptoms2010In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether tapering down of combined estrogen plus progestogen therapy (EPT) reduced the recurrence of hot flashes and resumption of therapy compared with abrupt discontinuation. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was affected after discontinuation of EPT and to investigate the possible factors predicting resumption of EPT.

    METHODS: Eighty-one postmenopausal women undergoing EPT because of hot flashes were randomized to tapering down or abrupt discontinuation of EPT. Vasomotor symptoms were recorded in self-registered diaries, and resumption of hormone therapy (HT) was asked for at every follow-up. The Psychological General Well-being Index was used to assess HRQoL.

    RESULTS: Neither the number nor the severity of hot flashes or HRQoL or frequency of resumption of HT differed between the two modes of discontinuation of EPT during up to 12 months of follow-up. About every other woman had resumed HT within 1 year. Women who resumed HT after 4 or 12 months reported more deteriorated HRQoL and more severe hot flashes after discontinuation of therapy than did women who did not resume HT.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women who initiate EPT because of hot flashes may experience recurrence of vasomotor symptoms and impaired HRQoL after discontinuation of EPT regardless of the discontinuation method used, abrupt or taper down. Because, in addition to severity of flashes, decreased well-being was the main predictor of the risk to resume HT, it seems important to also discuss quality of life in parallel with efforts to discontinue HT.

  • 5. McInnes, Kerry J.
    et al.
    Andersson, Therese C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Simonyte, Kotryna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderström, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Seckl, Jonathan R.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Association of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I expression and activity with estrogen receptor beta in adipose tissue from postmenopausal women2012In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 1347-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (11 beta HSD1) regenerates active cortisol from inert cortisone in adipose tissue. Elevated adipose tissue 11 beta HSD1 activity is observed in obese humans and rodents, where it is linked to obesity and its metabolic consequences. Menopause is also associated with increased abdominal fat accumulation, suggesting that estrogen is also important in adipose tissue metabolism. The purpose of this current study was to establish whether estrogen signaling through estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ER-beta) could influence 11 beta HSD1 in premenopausal and postmenopausal adipose tissues. Methods: Nineteen premenopausal (aged 26 +/- 5 y; body mass index, 23.6 +/- 1.6 kg/m(2)) and 23 postmenopausal (aged 63 +/- 4 y; body mass index, 23.4 +/- 1.9 kg/m(2)) healthy women were studied. Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies and fasting venous blood samples were taken. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome adipocyte cells were treated with ER-alpha- and ER-beta-specific agonists for 24 hours. Basic anthropometric data, serum 17 beta-estradiol and progesterone concentrations, ER-alpha and ER-beta messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, and 11 beta HSD1 mRNA, protein, and activity levels were assessed. Results: ER-beta and 11 beta HSD1, but not ER-alpha, mRNAs were significantly increased in adipose tissue from postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women. ER-beta had a significant positive correlation with the mRNA level of 11 beta HSD1 in adipose tissue from premenopausal and postmenopausal women. This association between ER-beta and 11 beta HSD1 was greatest in adipose tissue from postmenopausal women. In human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome adipocytes, diarylpropiolnitrile, a selective ER-beta agonist, increased 11 beta HSD1 mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Conclusions: We conclude that, in adipose tissue, ER-beta-mediated estrogen signaling can up-regulate 11 beta HSD1 and that this may be of particular importance in postmenopausal women.

  • 6.
    Ödmark, Inga-Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Bixo, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Englund, Doris
    Risberg, Björn
    Jonsson, Björn
    Olsson, Sven-Eric
    Endometrial safety and bleeding pattern during a five-year treatment with long-cycle hormone therapy2005In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 699-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine compliance, the incidence of untoward effects, and endometrial safety in postmenopausal women treated with 3-month sequential hormone therapy for up to 5 years.

    Design: A prospective, uncontrolled multicenter study of 129 women treated with 0.625 mg conjugated estrogens daily plus 10 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate for 14 days every third month. Endometrial biopsy samples were taken before the initiation of the study and then yearly during the next 5 years. Bleeding patterns were recorded.

    Results: Upon completion of the first 12 months of treatment, 76 of 126 biopsied women (60%) had secretory endometrium. After 5 years, this finding was reversed in biopsy specimens completed by 59 women, among whom 32 (56%) had insufficient or atrophic endometrium.We did not find any hyperplasia when the biopsy specimen was taken according to the protocol. One endometrial cancer was found by biopsy after 12 months, but the subsequent hysterectomy showed no sign of cancer. Ultrasound determinations of mean endometrial thickness during therapy showed a thin endometrium (mean = 4 mm, range = 1-13 mm). Amenorrhea was reported by 6.2% of 129 women after 12 months of treatment. Among the 59 women who completed the study, 71.2% had regular bleeding patterns every third month, 25.4% reported amenorrhea, and 3.4% had irregular bleeding patterns.

    Conclusions: The addition of 10 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate for 14 days every third month to treatment with 0.625 mg of conjugated estrogens daily was well tolerated, and was associated with high endometrial safety.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf