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  • 1.
    A'Roch, Roman
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Poelaert, Jan
    Anesthesiology, University of Brussels, Belgium.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Left ventricular strain and peak systolic velocity: responses to controlled changes in load and contractility, explored in a porcine model2012In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 10, no 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tissue velocity echocardiography is increasingly used to evaluate global and regional cardiac function. Previous studies have suggested that the quantitative measurements obtained during ejection are reliable indices of contractility, though their load-sensitivity has been studied in different settings, but still remains a matter of controversy. We sought to characterize the effects of acute load change (both preload and afterload) and change in inotropic state on peak systolic velocity and strain as a measure of LV contractility.

    METHODS: Thirteen anesthetized juvenile pigs were studied, using direct measurement of left ventricular pressure and volume and transthoracic echocardiography. Transient inflation of a vena cava balloon catheter produced controlled load alterations. At least eight consecutive beats in the sequence were analyzed with tissue velocity echocardiography during the load alteration and analyzed for change in peak systolic velocities and strain during same contractile status with a controlled load alteration. Two pharmacological inotropic interventions were also included to generate several myocardial contractile conditions in each animal.

    RESULTS: Peak systolic velocities reflected the drug-induced changes in contractility in both radial and longitudinal axis. During the acute load change, the peak systolic velocities remain stable when derived from signal in the longitudinal axis and from the radial axis. The peak systolic velocity parameter demonstrated no strong relation to either load or inotropic intervention, that is, it remained unchanged when load was systematically and progressively varied (peak systolic velocity, longitudinal axis, control group beat 1- 5.72 +/- 1.36 with beat 8- 6.49 +/- 1.28 cm/sec, 95% confidence interval), with the single exception of the negative inotropic intervention group where peak systolic velocity decreased a small amount during load reduction (beat 1- 3.98 +/- 0.92 with beat 8- 2.72 +/- 0.89 cm/sec). Systolic strain, however, showed a clear degree of load-dependence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Peak systolic velocity appears to be load-independent as tested by beat-to-beat load reduction, while peak systolic strain appears to be load-dependent in this model. Peak systolic velocity, in a controlled experimental model where successive beats during load alteration are assessed, has a strong relation to contractility. Peak systolic velocity, but not peak strain rate, is largely independent of load, in this model. More study is needed to confirm this finding in the clinical setting.

  • 2.
    A'Roch, Roman
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Poelaert, Jan
    Anesthesiology, University of Brussels, Belgium.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Left ventricular twist is load-dependent as shown in a large animal model with controlled cardiac load2012In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 10, no 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular rotation and twist can be assessed noninvasively by speckle tracking echocardiography. We sought to characterize the effects of acute load change and change in inotropic state on rotation parameters as a measure of left ventricular (LV) contractility.

    METHODS: Seven anesthetised juvenile pigs were studied, using direct measurement of left ventricular pressure and volume and simultaneous transthoracic echocardiography. Transient inflation of an inferior vena cava balloon (IVCB) catheter produced controlled load reduction. First and last beats in the sequence of eight were analysed with speckle tracking (STE) during the load alteration and analysed for change in rotation/twist during controlled load alteration at same contractile status. Two pharmacological inotropic interventions were also included to examine the same hypothesis in additionally conditions of increased and decreased myocardial contractility in each animal. Paired comparisons were made for different load states using the Wilcoxon's Signed Rank test.

    RESULTS: The inferior vena cava balloon occlusion (IVCBO) load change compared for first to last beat resulted in LV twist increase (11.67degrees +/-2.65degrees vs. 16.17degrees +/-3.56degrees respectively, p < 0.004) during the load alteration and under adrenaline stimulation LV twist increase 12.56degrees +/-5.1degrees vs. 16.57degrees +/-4.6degrees (p < 0.013), and though increased, didn't reach significance in negative inotropic condition. Untwisting rate increased significantly at baseline from 41.7degrees/s +/-41.6degrees/s vs.122.6degrees/s +/-55.8degrees/s (P < 0.039) and under adrenaline stimulation untwisting rate increased (55.3degrees/s +/-3.8degrees/s vs.111.4degrees/s +/-24.0degrees/s (p < 0.05), but did not systematically changed in negative inotropic condition.

    CONCLUSIONS: Peak systolic LV twist and peak early diastolic untwisting rate are load dependent. Differences in LV load should be included in the interpretation when serial measures of twist are compared.

  • 3.
    Bajraktari, Gani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Batalli, Arlind
    Poniku, Afrim
    Ahmeti, Artan
    Olloni, Rozafa
    Hyseni, Violeta
    Vela, Zana
    Morina, Besim
    Tafarshiku, Rina
    Vela, Driton
    Rashiti, Premtim
    Haliti, Edmond
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Left ventricular markers of global dyssynchrony predict limited exercise capacity in heart failure, but not in patients with preserved ejection fraction2012In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 10, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to prospectively examine echocardiographic parameters that correlate and predict functional capacity assessed by 6 min walk test (6-MWT) in patients with heart failure (HF), irrespective of ejection fraction (EF).

    Methods: In 147 HF patients (mean age 61 +/- 11 years, 50.3% male), a 6-MWT and an echo-Doppler study were performed in the same day. Global LV dyssynchrony was indirectly assessed by total isovolumic time - t-IVT [in s/min; calculated as: 60 - (total ejection time + total filling time)], and Tei index (t-IVT/ejection time). Patients were divided into two groups based on the 6-MWT distance (Group I: <= 300 m and Group II: > 300 m), and also in two groups according to EF (Group A: LVEF >= 45% and Group B: LVEF <45%).

    Results: In the cohort of patients as a whole, the 6-MWT correlated with t-IVT (r = -0.49, p < 0.001) and Tei index (r = -0.43, p < 0.001) but not with any of the other clinical or echocardiographic parameters. Group I had lower hemoglobin level (p = 0.02), lower EF (p = 0.003), larger left atrium (p = 0.02), thicker interventricular septum (p = 0.02), lower A wave (p = 0.01) and lateral wall late diastolic myocardial velocity a' (p = 0.047), longer isovolumic relaxation time (r = 0.003) and longer t-IVT (p = 0.03), compared with Group II. In the patients cohort as a whole, only t-IVT ratio [1.257 (1.071-1.476), p = 0.005], LV EF [0.947 (0.903-0.993), p = 0.02], and E/A ratio [0.553 (0.315-0.972), p = 0.04] independently predicted poor 6-MWT performance (< 300 m) in multivariate analysis. None of the echocardiographic measurements predicted exercise tolerance in HFpEF.

    Conclusion: In patients with HF, the limited exercise capacity, assessed by 6-MWT, is related mostly to severity of global LV dyssynchrony, more than EF or raised filling pressures. The lack of exercise predictors in HFpEF reflects its multifactorial pathophysiology.

  • 4. Batalli, Arlind
    et al.
    Ibrahimi, Pranvera
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Clinic of Cardiology, University Clinical Centre of Kosova, "Rrethi i Spitalit", p.n., Prishtina, Kosovo.
    Bytyçi, Ibadete
    Ahmeti, Artan
    Haliti, Edmond
    Elezi, Shpend
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St George University London, London, United Kingdom.
    Bajraktari, Gani
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Clinic of Cardiology, University Clinical Centre of Kosova, “Rrethi i Spitalit”, p.n., Prishtina, Kosovo; Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina, Prishtina, Kosovo.
    Different determinants of exercise capacity in HFpEF compared to HFrEF2017In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Quality of life is as important as survival in heart failure (HF) patients. Controversies exist with regards to echocardiographic determinants of exercise capacity in HF, particularly in patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The aim of this study was to prospectively examine echocardiographic parameters that correlate and predict functional exercise capacity assessed by 6 min walk test (6-MWT) in patients with HFpEF.

    METHODS: In 111 HF patients (mean age 63 ± 10 years, 47% female), an echo-Doppler study and a 6-MWT were performed in the same day. Patients were divided into two groups based on the 6-MWT distance (Group I: ≤ 300 m and Group II: >300 m).

    RESULTS: Group I were older (p = 0.008), had higher prevalence of diabetes (p = 0.027), higher baseline heart rate (p = 0.004), larger left atrium - LA (p = 0.001), longer LV filling time - FT (p = 0.019), shorter isovolumic relaxation time (p = 0.037), shorter pulmonary artery acceleration time - PA acceleration time (p = 0.006), lower left atrial lateral wall myocardial velocity (a') (p = 0.018) and lower septal systolic myocardial velocity (s') (p = 0.023), compared with Group II. Patients with HF and reduced EF (HFrEF) had lower hemoglobin (p = 0.007), higher baseline heart rate (p = 0.005), higher NT-ProBNP (p = 0.001), larger LA (p = 0.004), lower septal s', e', a' waves, and septal mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE), shorter PA acceleration time (p < 0.001 for all), lower lateral MAPSE, higher E/A & E/e', and shorter LVFT (p = 0.001 for all), lower lateral e' (p = 0.009), s' (p = 0.006), right ventricular e' and LA emptying fraction (p = 0.012 for both), compared with HFpEF patients. In multivariate analysis, only LA diameter [2.676 (1.242-5.766), p = 0.012], and diabetes [0.274 (0.084-0.898), p = 0.033] independently predicted poor 6-MWT performance in the group as a whole. In HFrEF, age [1.073 (1.012-1.137), p = 0.018] and LA diameter [3.685 (1.348-10.071), p = 0.011], but in HFpEF, lateral s' [0.295 (0.099-0.882), p = 0.029], and hemoglobin level [0.497 (0.248-0.998), p = 0.049] independently predicted poor 6-MWT performance.

    CONCLUSIONS: In HF patients determinants of exercise capacity differ according to severity of overall LV systolic function, with left atrial enlargement in HFrEF and longitudinal systolic shortening in HFpEF as the the main determinants.

  • 5. Dalla, Keti
    et al.
    Hallman, Caroline
    Bech-Hanssen, Odd
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Ricksten, Sven-Erik
    Strain echocardiography identifies impaired longitudinal systolic function in patients with septic shock and preserved ejection fraction2015In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 13, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myocardial dysfunction is recognized in sepsis. We hypothesized that mechanical left (LV) and right (RV) ventricular function analysed using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in a cohort of early severe sepsis or septic shock patients, would be different to that of a group of critically ill, non-septic patients.

    Methods: Critically ill adult patients with early, severe sepsis/septic shock (n = 48) and major trauma patients with no sepsis (n = 24) were included retrospectively, as well as healthy controls (n = 16). Standard echocardiographic examinations, including right (RV) left (LV) volumes and mitral, aortic and pulmonary vein Doppler flow profiles, were retrospectively identified and the studies were then reanalysed for assessment of myocardial strain using speckle-tracking echocardiography. Endocardial tracing of the LV was performed in apical four-chamber (4-Ch), two-chamber (2-Ch), apical long-axis (3-Ch) and apical views of RV determining the longitudinal LV and RV free wall strain in each subject.

    Results: In septic patients, heart rate was significantly higher (p = 0.009) and systolic (p < 0.001) and mean arterial pressures (p < 0.001), as well as systemic vascular resistance (p < 0.001) were significantly lower when compared to the non-septic trauma group. Ninety-three per cent of the septic patients and 50 % of the trauma patients were treated with norepinephrine (p < 0.001). LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was lower in the septic patients (p = 0.019). In septic patients with preserved LVEF (>50 %, n = 34), seventeen patients (50 %) had a depressed LV global longitudinal function, defined as a LV global strain > -15 %, compared to two patients (8.7 %) in the non-septic group (p = 0.0014). In septic patients with preserved LVEF, LV global and RV free wall strain were 14 % (p = 0.014) and 17 % lower (p = 0.008), respectively, compared to the non-septic group with preserved LVEF. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to LV end-diastolic or end-systolic volumes, stroke volume, or cardiac output. There were no signs of diastolic dysfunction from the mitral or pulmonary vein Doppler profiles in the septic patients.

    Conclusions: LV and RV systolic function is impaired in critically ill patients with early septic shock and preserved LVEF, as detected by Speckle-tracking 2D echocardiography. Strain imaging may be useful in the early detection of myocardial dysfunction in sepsis.

  • 6.
    Jashari, Haki
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Ibrahimi, Pranvera
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Bajraktari, Gani
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Kryeziu, Lindita
    Jashari, Fisnik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Henein, Michael Y.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Normal ranges of left ventricular strain in children: a meta-analysis2015In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 13, article id 37Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The definition of normal values of two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography derived left ventricular (LV) deformation parameters, is of critical importance for the routine application of this modality in children. The objectives of this study were to perform a meta-analysis of normal ranges for longitudinal, circumferential and radial strain/strain rate values and to identify confounders that may contribute to differences in reported measures. Methods and Results: A systematic search was conducted. Studies describing normal healthy subjects and observational studies that used control groups as a comparison were included. Data were combined using a random-effect model. Effects of demographic, clinical and equipment variables were assessed through meta-regression. The search identified 1,192 subjects form 28 articles. Longitudinal strain (LS) normal mean values varied from -12.9 to -26.5 (mean, -20.5; 95 % CI, -20.0 to -21.0). Normal mean values of circumferential strain (CS) varied from -10.5 to -27.0 (mean, -22.06; 95 % CI, -21.5 to -22.5). Radial strain (RS) normal mean values varied from 24.9 to 62.1 (mean, 45.4; 95 % CI, 43.0 to 47.8). Meta-regression showed LV end diastolic diameter as a significant determinant of variation for LS. Longitudinal systolic strain rate (LSRs) was significantly determined by the age and RS by the type of vendor used. Conclusion: Variations among different normal ranges were dependent on the vendor used, LV end-diastolic diameter and age. Vendor-independent software for analyzing myocardial deformation in children, using images from different vendors would be the ideal solution for strain measurements or else using the same system for patient's follow up.

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