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  • 1.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Kanerud, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Diamant, Ulla-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Eriksson, Berne
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    The prevalence of prolonged QTc increases by GOLD stage, and is associated with worse survival among subjects with COPD2019In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 148-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of QTc-prolongation, in relation to the increased mortality in COPD, is unclear.

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and prognostic impact, assessed as mortality, of QTc-prolongation in COPD, restrictive spirometric pattern (RSP), and normal lung function (NLF), respectively.

    Methods: All individuals (n = 993) with COPD and age- and sex-matched non-obstructive referents were identified from well-defined population-based cohorts examined in Northern Sweden in 2002–04. In 2005, the study-sample was invited to re-examination including ECG; QTc was calculated and mortality data collected until 31st December 2010.

    Results: The prevalence of QTc-prolongation was higher among people with RSP than among those with NLF and, although similar in NLF and COPD, the prevalence increased by COPD-severity. Among participants with COPD, those with QTc prolongation had higher mortality than those with normal QTc, while no such differences were found among participants with NLF or RSP.

    Conclusion: Among participants with COPD, the prevalence of QTc-prolongation increased by disease-severity and was associated with mortality.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Center for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital.
    The effect of music intervention in stress response to cardiac surgery in a randomized clinical trial2009In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate the effect of bed rest with music on the first postoperative day to decrease stress for patients who have undergone heart surgery.

    Methods A repeated-measures randomized controlled trial was used. The study took place in a cardiothoracic intermediary unit of a university hospital in Sweden. Fifty-eight patients who had undergone open coronary artery bypass grafting or aortic valve replacement surgery were included. Stress response was assessed by determining the serum cortisol, heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen tension, arterial oxygen saturation, and subjective pain and anxiety levels. At 12:00 noon on postoperative day 1, patients were allocated to receive 30 minutes of uninterrupted bed rest with music and then 30 minutes of bed rest or alternatively 60 minutes of uninterrupted bed rest. The music was soft and relaxing, included different melodies in new-age style, played with a volume at 50 to 60 dB, and distributed through a music pillow connected to an MP3 player.

    Results After 30 minutes of bed rest, there was a significant difference in s-cortisol levels between the groups; 484. 4 mmol/L in the music group versus 618.8 mmol/L in the control group (P < .02). However, this difference in s-cortisol levels was not found 30 minutes later (ie, after a total of 60 minutes). There was no difference in heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen tension, arterial oxygen saturation, and subjective pain and anxiety levels between the groups.

    Conclusion There is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction to suggest that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open heart surgery be put into clinical use.

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