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  • 1.
    Franks, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Identifying genes for primary hypertension: methodological limitations and gene-environment interactions2009In: Journal of Human Hypertension, ISSN 0950-9240, E-ISSN 1476-5527, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 227-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertension segregates within families, indicating that genetic factors explain some of the variance in the risk of developing the disease; however, even with major advances in genotyping technologies facilitating the discovery of multiple genetic risk markers for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, little progress has been made in defining the genetic defects that cause elevations in blood pressure. Several plausible explanations exist for this apparent paradox, one of which is that the risk conveyed by genes involved in the development of hypertension is context dependent. This notion is supported by a growing number of published animal and human studies, although none has yet provided unequivocal evidence that genetic and environmental factors interact to influence the risk of primary hypertension in humans. In this review, an assumption is made that common genetic variation contributes meaningfully to the development of primary hypertension. The review focuses on (i) several methodological limitations of genetic association studies and (ii) the roles that gene-environment interactions might play in the development of primary hypertension. The proceeding sections of the review examine the design features necessary for future studies to adequately test the hypothesis that genes for primary hypertension act in a context-dependent manner. Finally, an outline of how knowledge of gene-environment interactions might be used to optimize the prevention or treatment of primary hypertension is provided.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 13 November 2008; doi:10.1038/jhh.2008.134.

  • 2.
    Lindholm, Lars H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Black, HR
    Bakris, GL
    Linas, SL
    Krum, H
    Weiss, R
    Linseman, JV
    Wiens, BL
    Warren, MS
    Weber, M
    Darusentan treatment significantly decreases blood pressure and results in better systolic blood pressure control when added to multi-drug therapy in patients with resistant hypertension2009In: Journal of Human Hypertension, ISSN 0950-9240, E-ISSN 1476-5527, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 697-697Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Minh, Hoang Van
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Gender differences in prevalence and sosioeconomic determinants of hypertension: findings from the WHO STEPs survey in a rural community of Vietnam2006In: Journal of Human Hypertension, ISSN 0950-9240, E-ISSN 1476-5527, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Molander, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Blood pressure change and antihypertensive treatment in old and very old people: evidence of age, sex and cohort effects2013In: Journal of Human Hypertension, ISSN 0950-9240, E-ISSN 1476-5527, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidemiology of blood pressure in very old age has not been thoroughly studied. The objective of this study was to study blood pressure changes throughout old age and changes in blood pressure and antihypertensive drug use from 1981 to 2005. The study includes 1133 blood pressure measurements from two studies carried out in Umea, Sweden. The U70 study (1981-1990) included individuals aged 70-88 and the Umea 85+/GERDA study (2000-2005) covered people aged 85, 90 or >= 95 years. The impact of age, sex and year of investigation on blood pressure was investigated using linear regression. Mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased by 0.35mmHg (P<0.001) for each year of age. An inverted U-shaped relation was found between age and systolic blood pressure (SBP), with SBP reaching its maximum at 74.5 years. Mean SBP and DBP also decreased over time (SBP by 0.44mmHg per year, P<0.001 and DBP by 0.34mmHg per year, P<0.001). The proportion of participants on antihypertensive drugs increased from 39.0% in 1981 to 69.4% in 2005. In this study of people aged >= 70 years, mean SBP and DBP decreased with higher age and later investigation year. Antihypertensive drug use increased with time, which might partly explain the observed cohort effect.

  • 5.
    Pham, Son Thai
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nguyen, Quang Ngoc
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Viet, NL
    Khai, PG
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Bonita, Ruth
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension in Vietnam: results from a national survey2012In: Journal of Human Hypertension, ISSN 0950-9240, E-ISSN 1476-5527, Vol. 26, p. 268-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to estimate mean blood pressure (BP), prevalence of hypertension (defined as BP 140/90 mm Hg) and its awareness, treatment and control in the Vietnamese adult population. This cross-sectional survey took place in eight Vietnamese provinces and cities. Multi-stage stratified sampling was used to select 9832 participants from the general population aged 25 years and over. Trained observers obtained two or three BP measurements from each person, using an automatic sphygmomanometer. Information on socio-geographical factors and anti-hypertensive medications was obtained using a standard questionnaire. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 25.1%, 28.3% in men and 23.1% in women. Among hypertensives, 48.4% were aware of their elevated BP, 29.6% had treatment and 10.7% achieved targeted BP control (<140/90 mm Hg). Among hypertensive aware, 61.1% had treatment, and among hypertensive treated, 36.3% had well control. Hypertension increased with age in both men and women. The hypertension was significantly higher in urban than in rural areas (32.7 vs 17.3%, P<0.001). Hypertension is a major and increasing public health problem in Vietnam. Prevalence among adults is high, whereas the proportions of hypertensives aware, treated and controlled were unacceptably low. These results imply an urgent need to develop national strategies to improve prevention and control of hypertension in Vietnam.

  • 6.
    Tesfaye, Fikru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Van Minh, H
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Berhane, Yemane
    Bonita, Ruth
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Association between body mass index and blood pressure across three populations in Africa and Asia.2007In: Journal of Human Hypertension, ISSN 0950-9240, E-ISSN 1476-5527, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 28-37Article in journal (Refereed)
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