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  • 1. Ambrosi, Aurelie
    et al.
    Salomonsson, Stina
    Eliasson, Håkan
    Zeffer, Elisabeth
    Dzikaite, Vijole
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Fernlund, Eva
    Theander, Elke
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Öhman, Annika
    Skogh, Thomas
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Fored, Michael
    Blomqvist, Paul
    Ekbom, Anders
    Lindström, Ulla
    Melander, Mats
    Winqvist, Ola
    Gadler, Fredrik
    Jonzon, Anders
    Sonesson, Sven-Erik
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Influence of season of birth and maternal age in the development of congenital heart block in anti-Ro-SSA/La-SSB positive pregnancies2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 265-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Andersen, G. Neumann
    et al.
    Andersen, M.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J. E. S.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dermal Melanocortin Receptor Rebound in Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis after Anti-TGF ss 1 Antibody Therapy2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 478-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbed transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) signalling leads to enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is manifested as systemic sclerosis (SSc), but this may be attenuated by the melanocortin system. Here, we report of rebound reaction in the gene expression of melanocortin receptor (MCR) subtypes and of the precursor of these receptors ligands, the pro-opio-melanocortin protein (POMC), in the acute skin lesion of diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) after treatment with a recombinant human anti-TGF beta 1 antibody. Biopsies, taken from the leading edge of the skin lesion, before and after treatment of a patient with recent onset dSSc, were examined. Before treatment, increased levels of TGF beta mRNA and suppressed levels of POMC mRNA and MCR subtypes MC1-3, 5R mRNAs were seen in the lesion, compared with healthy controls. After treatment, there was a rebound expression of POMC, MC2, 3, 5R mRNAs. As the melanocortin system regulates collagen and melanin production, our findings add a new understanding to the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the acute skin lesion of dSSc, which is characterized by enhanced ECM formation and changes in skin pigmentation.

  • 3.
    Andersen, Grethe
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Hägglund, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Frängsmyr, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Petrovska, R
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J E S
    Quantitative measurement of the levels of melanocortin receptor subtype 1, 2, 3 and 5 and pro-opio-melanocortin peptide gene expression in subsets of human peripheral blood leucocytes2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Levels of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1, 2, 3 and 5 subtypes and pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) protein mRNA were measured by the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, CD8+ T cytotoxic cells, CD19+ B cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocytes from healthy donors. We found high levels of all of the MC1, 2, 3 and 5R subtype mRNA in Th cells and moderate levels in NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes. POMC peptide mRNA was found in all examined leucocyte subsets, but only low levels were present in granulocytes. Our findings suggest a co-ordinating role for MCR subtypes and their naturally occurring ligands in the co-operation between innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, our findings are compatible with earlier finding of MCR-mediated tolerance induction in Th cells.

  • 4.
    Andersen, Grethe N.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nagaeva, O
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Cytokine mRNA profile of alveolar T lymphocytes and macrophages in patients with systemic sclerosis suggests a local Tr1 response2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 272-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of an autoimmune disease like systemic sclerosis (SSc) is suspected to be driven by an activated T lymphocyte subset, expressing a cytokine profile specific to the disease. To further characterize the type of immune reaction in SSc, we searched for a broad panel of cytokine messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) in T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages from paired samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peripheral blood in 18 patients and 16 age- and sex-matched controls. RNA from CD3(+) T lymphocytes and CD14(+) monocytes/macrophages was examined by means of the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. SSc alveolar T lymphocytes expressed a cytokine profile suggestive of a mixed Th1/Th2 reaction, showing an increased frequency of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6 and interferon (IFN)γ, while IL-1β, IFNγ and tumour necrosis factor β were expressed in blood T lymphocytes in a higher percentage of patients with SSc than controls. SSc alveolar T cells expressed IL-10 mRNA more often than peripheral T cells, a phenomenon not found in controls and which may point at local IL-10 activation/response in SSc lung. Transforming growth factor β mRNA was present in all alveolar as well as peripheral blood T cell samples in patients and controls. The cytokine mRNA profile in SSc with interstitial lung disease (ILD) was similar to the profile found in SSc without ILD. Our findings point at a mixed Th1/Th2 reaction in SSc and may indicate regulatory T 1 cell activation/response in the lungs of patients with SSc.

  • 5. Andersen, M.
    et al.
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Meyer, M. K.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Andersen, G. N.
    Melanocortin 2, 3 and 4 Receptor Gene Expressions are Downregulated in CD8(+) T Cytotoxic Lymphocytes and CD19(+) B Lymphocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Responding to TNF- Inhibition2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanocortin signalling in leucocyte subsets elicits anti-inflammatory and immune tolerance inducing effects in animal experimental inflammation. In man, however, the effects of melanocortin signalling in inflammatory conditions have scarcely been examined. We explored the differential reactions of melanocortin 1-5 receptors (MC1-5R) gene expressions in pathogenetic leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with TNF- inhibitor adalimumab. Seven patients with active RA donated blood at start and at 3-month treatment. CD4(+) T helper (h) lymphocytes (ly), CD8(+) T cytotoxic (c) ly, CD19(+) B ly and CD14(+) monocytes were isolated, using immunomagnetic beads, total RNA extracted and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) performed. Fold changes in MC1-5R, Th1-, inflammatory- and regulatory cytokine gene expressions were assessed for correlation. Six patients responded to adalimumab treatment, while one patient was non-responder. In all lymphocyte subtypes, MC1-5R gene expressions decreased in responders and increased in the non-responder. In responders, decrease in MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc and CD19(+) B ly was significant. Fold change in MC1-5R and IFN gene expressions correlated significantly in CD8(+) Tc ly, while fold change in MC1R, MC3R and MC5R and IL-1 gene expressions correlated significantly in CD4(+) Th ly. Our results show regulation of MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD19(+) B ly. The correlations between fold change in different MCRs and disease driving cytokine gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD4(+) Th ly point at a central immune modulating function of the melanocortin system in RA.

  • 6.
    Banday, Viqar Showkat
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Thyagarajan, Radha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Contribution of both B cell intrinsic alterations as well as non-hematopoietic derived factors in the enhanced immune response of the NOD mouse2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 252-252Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Bas, A
    et al.
    Forsberg, G
    Hammarström, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, M-L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Utility of the housekeeping genes 18S rRNA, beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase for normalization in real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression in human T lymphocytes.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 566-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accuracy of 18S rRNA, beta-actin mRNA and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA as indicators of cell number when used for normalization in gene expression analysis of T lymphocytes at different activation stages was investigated. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression level of 18S rRNA, beta-actin mRNA, GAPDH mRNA and mRNA for six cytokines in carefully counted samples of resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), intestinal lymphocytes and PBMCs subjected to polyclonal T-cell activation. The 18S rRNA level in activated and resting PBMCs and intestinal lymphocytes was essentially the same, while the levels of beta-actin and GAPDH mRNAs fluctuated markedly upon activation. When isolated gammadeltaTCR(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) subpopulations were studied, 18S rRNA levels remained unchanged after 21 h of activation but increased slightly after 96 h. In contrast, there was a 30-70-fold increase of GAPDH mRNA/cell in these cell populations upon activation. Cytokine analysis revealed that only normalization to 18S rRNA gave a result that satisfactorily reflected their mRNA expression levels per cell. In conclusion, 18S rRNA was the most stable housekeeping gene and hence superior for normalization in comparative analyses of mRNA expression levels in human T lymphocytes.

  • 8.
    Bas, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Forsberg, Göte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Utility of the housekeeping genes 18S rRNA, β-actin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) for normalisation in real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in human T lymphocytes2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 566-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accuracy of 18S rRNA, β-actin mRNA and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA as indicators of cell number when used for normalization in gene expression analysis of T lymphocytes at different activation stages was investigated. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression level of 18S rRNA, β-actin mRNA, GAPDH mRNA and mRNA for six cytokines in carefully counted samples of resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), intestinal lymphocytes and PBMCs subjected to polyclonal T-cell activation. The 18S rRNA level in activated and resting PBMCs and intestinal lymphocytes was essentially the same, while the levels of β-actin and GAPDH mRNAs fluctuated markedly upon activation. When isolated γδTCR+, CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations were studied, 18S rRNA levels remained unchanged after 21 h of activation but increased slightly after 96 h. In contrast, there was a 30–70-fold increase of GAPDH mRNA/cell in these cell populations upon activation. Cytokine analysis revealed that only normalization to 18S rRNA gave a result that satisfactorily reflected their mRNA expression levels per cell. In conclusion, 18S rRNA was the most stable housekeeping gene and hence superior for normalization in comparative analyses of mRNA expression levels in human T lymphocytes.

  • 9. Bergman, Emma Ahlen
    et al.
    Hartana, Ciputra Adijaya
    Linton, Ludvig
    Winerdal, Malin E.
    Krantz, David
    Rosenblatt, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lundgren, Christian
    Marits, Per
    Sherif, Amir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Epigenetic methylation profiles of CD4 T cell signature loci from patients with urinary bladder cancer2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 264-264Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10. Bjornsdottir, Halla
    et al.
    Christenson, Karin
    Forsman, Huamei
    Stylianou, Marios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Urban, Constantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Dahlgren, Claes
    Karlsson, Anna
    Bylund, Johan
    Cytotoxic Peptides from S. aureus Cause Neutrophil Cell Death with NET-like Features2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 432-432Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Brink, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ärlestig, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    B Regulatory Cells are Functionally Impaired in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and in Their First-Degree Relatives Compared with Controls2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 450-450Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Colucci, Francesco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). INSERM U429, Necker Hospital, Paris, France.
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Diabetes induction in C57BL/6 mice reconstituted with lymphocytes of nonobese diabetic C57BL/6 mouse embryo aggregation chimeras1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 571-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine whether the genetic background of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas contributes to autoimmune diabetes susceptibility, we have used a model of the disease based on transferring spleen cells from nonobese diabetic (NOD) <--> C57BL/6 (B6) embryo aggregation (EA) chimeras into B6 and NOD irradiated mice. Insulitis and diabetes could be induced into both B6 and NOD hosts, albeit with low incidence. Cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment, known to accelerate diabetes in prediabetic NOD mice, was found to increase diabetes incidence up to 50-60% in both B6 and NOD mice reconstituted with chimeric splenocytes, while diabetes did not occur in CY-treated B6 mice reconstituted with B6 splenocytes. We conclude that the genetic make-up of the target organ does not affect the final stage of the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  • 13.
    d'Elia, Helena Forsblad
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Carlsten, H
    The impact of hormone replacement therapy on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo in post-menopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 68, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that oestrogen has immunomodulatory properties. We have previously shown disease ameliorating effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in post-menopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HRT and the patients inflammatory state on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Eighty-eight post-menopausal RA women were allocated to receive HRT (oestradiol and noretisterone acetate), vitamin D3 and calcium or vitamin D3 and calcium alone in a 2-year randomized controlled trial. Immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG and IgA) in serum were measured by nephelometry and rheumatoid factor (RF) concentration by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunization with influenza vaccine was performed to quantitate humoral response to recall antigen and tuberculin skin test with purified protein derivative (PPD) to test T-cell-mediated immune response. These immune related measures were correlated with demographic and disease-related variables. HRT during 2 years did not alter concentrations of Ig, RF, IgM response to influenza vaccine or the PPD reaction. The increase in IgM against influenza vaccine was significantly positively correlated with signs of disease activity; C-reactive protein, disease activity score 28 and inversely with haemoglobin. In contrast, PPD reactivity was inversely associated with disease activity. In conclusion, long-term HRT in RA does not influence Ig or autoantibody concentrations in serum and has no significant impact on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to recall antigens. Interestingly, high disease activity was associated to increased humoral but decreased cell-mediated immune responses irrespectively of hormone treatment.

  • 14.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Baranov, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Frängsmyr, L
    Zoubir, F
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Interferon-gamma tempers the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen family molecules in human colon cells: a possible role in innate mucosal defence.2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 628-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)s, i.e. CEA, CEACAM1, CEACAM6 and CEACAM7, are localized to the apical glycocalyx of normal colonic epithelium and have been suggested to play a role in innate immunity. The expression of these molecules in colon carcinoma cells was studied at the mRNA and protein levels after treatment with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-1beta, live bacteria or lipopolysaccharide. The colon carcinoma cell lines LS174T and HT-29 were studied in detail using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoflow cytometry and immunoelectron microscopy. IFN-gamma, but not the other agents, modified expression of CEA, CEACAM1 and CEACAM6. None of the agents upregulated CEACAM7 expression. Two expression patterns were seen. HT-29 cells, which initially showed low quantities of mRNAs and proteins, displayed marked upregulation of both mRNAs and proteins. LS174T cells transcribed stable high levels of mRNA before and after treatment. Additionally, IFN-gamma induced increased cell surface expression of CEA, CEACAM1 and CECAM6. IFN-gamma has two important effects on the expression levels of the CEA family molecules in colon epithelial cells: direct upregulation of CEACAM1 and promotion of cell differentiation resulting in increased expression of CEA and CEACAM6 and decreased expression of CEACAM7.

  • 15. Gustafsson, A
    et al.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lundgren, E
    Similar effects of treatment with alpha interferon on the protein synthesis of human large granular lymphocytes, T cells, and monocytes.1985In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 519-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preparations of human large granular lymphocytes (LGL), T cells, and monocytes (MC) were obtained through centrifugation on Percoll gradients and preparative E-rosetting. The different preparations contained more than 80% of the appropriate cell type, as judged by their ability to lyse 51Cr-labelled K562 cells, cell morphology, and the presence of cell surface structures recognized by the OKT3, OKT10, Leu 7 and OKM1 monoclonal antibodies. The protein synthesis is unstimulated and alpha interferon (IFN-alpha)-treated cells of the different types was studied by subjecting 35S-methionine-labelled cell extracts to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The general pattern of protein synthesis in LGL and T cells was virtually identical, whereas at least 7 major proteins were synthesized at a higher rate in monocytes. The effects of IFN-alpha on the protein synthesis of LGL and T cells were identical, IFN-alpha increasing the rate of synthesis of 9 proteins. These proteins were also expressed, but not always IFN-augmentable, in monocytes. No additional, cell-type associated, IFN-inducible proteins were found. This suggests that the augmenting effect of IFN-alpha on the cytotoxic capacity of LGL, T cells, and monocytes may be to affect common steps in their lytic machineries.

  • 16.
    Hammarström, Sten
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Berzins, Klavs
    Biberfeld, Peter
    Engvall, Eva
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Holm, Göran
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Peter Perlmann 1919-2005.2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 487-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Ilander, Mette
    et al.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    Lahteenmaki, Hanna
    Kasanen, Tiina
    Koskenvesa, Perttu
    Soderlund, Stina
    Hoglund, Martin
    Markevärn, Berit
    Själander, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lofti, Kouros
    Malm, Claes
    Lubking, Anna
    Ekblom, Marja
    Holm, Elena
    Bjoreman, Mats
    Lehmann, Soren
    Stenke, Leif
    Ohm, Lotta
    Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik
    Saussele, Susanne
    Mahon, Francois-Xavier
    Porkka, Kimmo
    Richter, Johan
    Mustjoki, Satu
    Disease Relapse After Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Treatment Discontinuation in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia is Related to Both Low Number and Impaired Function of NK Cells2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 467-468Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kerkman, Priscilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Tuiskunen-Bäck, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Dernstedt, Andy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Wigren, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Forsell, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    The B cell response towards Puumala virus infection: can B cells be infected?2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 260-260Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19. Klein, O.
    et al.
    Ngo-Nyekel, F.
    Stefanache, T.
    Torres, R.
    Salomonsson, M.
    Hallgren, J.
    Radinger, M.
    Bambouskova, M.
    Campbell, M.
    Cohen-Mor, S.
    Dema, B.
    Rose, C. G.
    Abrink, M.
    Charles, N.
    Ainooson, G.
    Paivandy, A.
    Pavlova, V. G.
    Serrano-Candelas, E.
    Yu, Y.
    Hellman, L.
    Jensen, B. M.
    Van Anrooij, B.
    Grootens, J.
    Gura, H. K.
    Stylianou, Marios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Tobio, A.
    Blank, U.
    Ohrvik, H.
    Maurer, M.
    Identification of Biological and Pharmaceutical Mast Cell- and Basophil-Related Targets2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 465-472Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Kolan, Shrikant S.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lidström, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Björk, Karl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Forsell, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Modulation of lymphoma growth by a selective serotonin receptor antagonist2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 343-343Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Melgar, S
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Öberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Danielsson, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Cytolytic capabilities of lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes in normal and chronically inflamed human intestine2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 60, no 1-2, p. 167-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell-mediated lymphocyte cytotoxicity in ileum and colon of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and controls was investigated. Frequencies of cells expressing perforin and Fas-ligand (FasL) were determined by immunomorphometry. mRNA expression of perforin, granzyme B and FasL in T cells and subsets was assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Cytotoxicity of intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes was analysed without ex vivo activation in three functional assays: (1) anti-CD3-dependent T-cell receptor (TCR)-/CD3-mediated redirected cytotoxicity, (2) Fas-/FasL-mediated TCR-/CD3-independent cytotoxicity and (3) natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity. Inflammation in ileum of CD patients caused increased frequency of perforin-expressing cells and enhanced perforin-dependent TCR-/CD3-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, lymphocytes in the inflamed colon of UC or Crohn's colitis patients did not display this cytotoxicity nor did lymphocytes of normal colon. Normal colon lymphocytes showed spontaneous Fas-/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity. This activity was retained but not enhanced in inflamed UC colon. In contrast, a significant increase of FasL-expressing cells was seen in situ. Inflammation did not induce NK cell activity in colonic lymphocytes. Intestinal lymphocytes comprise effectors active in two different cytolytic processes. 'Classical' cytotoxic T lymphocytes in small intestine and lymphocytes executing TCR-/CD3-independent FasL-/Fas-mediated killing of unknown biological role present throughout the intestinal mucosa. Ongoing normal cytolytic processes seem to be enhanced by chronic inflammation.

  • 22.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Activated human gamma delta T lymphocytes express functional lactoferrin receptors.1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 609-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-binding protein in milk, mucosal secretions and neutrophil granules has bactericidal properties and is a source of iron for breast-fed infants. In this paper the authors show that most in vivo activated lymphocytes, i.e. freshly isolated lymphocytes from first trimester human decidua, and most in vitro activated human blood lymphocytes, express lactoferrin receptors (Lf-R), while unstimulated blood lymphocytes do not. All major lymphocyte subsets, i.e. alpha beta T cells, gamma delta T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, B cells and NK cells, express Lf-R after activation. The proportion of Lf-R expressing activated gamma delta T cells is significantly larger than that of activated alpha beta T cells. Lf-R and transferrin receptors (Tr-R/CD71) show the same kinetics of appearance on activated blood lymphocytes and are, to a large extent, expressed on the same cells. However, 35% of decidual lymphocytes and 15% of activated blood lymphocytes express Lf-R only. Addition of Lf to cultures containing an optimal concentration of Tr augments the proliferative response to polyclonal T cell activators and alloantigens, suggesting that presently used standard culture conditions for in vitro activation are suboptimal in particular for gamma delta T cells. Lf-R on decidual lymphocytes contain bound Lf, which probably is produced locally. The results suggest that Lf is a growth-supporting factor, especially important in local immune responses in the mucosa.

  • 23. Nordmark, Gunnel
    et al.
    Wang, Chuan
    Vasaitis, Lilian
    Eriksson, Per
    Theander, Elke
    Kvarnström, Marika
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Jazebi, Helmi
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Reksten, Tove Ragna
    Brun, Johan G
    Jonsson, Malin V
    Johnsen, Svein J
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Omdal, Roald
    Jonsson, Roland
    Bowman, Simon
    Ng, Wan-Fai
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Association of genes in the NF-κB pathway with antibody-positive primary Sjögren's syndrome.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 447-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltrates in the lachrymal and salivary glands and autoantibodies against the SSA/Ro and SSB/La antigens. Experimental studies have shown an activation of NF-κB in primary SS. NF-κB activation results in inflammation and autoimmunity and is regulated by inhibitory and activating proteins. Genetic studies have shown an association between multiple autoimmune diseases and TNFAIP3 (A20) and TNIP1 (ABIN1), both repressors of NF-κB and of IKBKE (IKKε), which is an NF-κB activator. The aim of this study was to analyse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IKBKE, NFKB1, TNIP1 and TNFAIP3 genes for association with primary SS. A total of 12 SNPs were genotyped in 1105 patients from Scandinavia (Sweden and Norway, n = 684) and the UK (n = 421) and 4460 controls (Scandinavia, n = 1662, UK, n = 2798). When patients were stratified for the presence of anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies (n = 868), case-control meta-analysis found an association between antibody-positive primary SS and two SNPs in TNIP1 (P = 3.4 × 10(-5) , OR = 1.33, 95%CI: 1.16-1.52 for rs3792783 and P = 1.3 × 10(-3) , OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.08-1.36 for rs7708392). A TNIP1 risk haplotype was associated with antibody-positive primary SS (P = 5.7 × 10(-3) , OR = 1.47, 95%CI: 1.12-1.92). There were no significant associations with IKBKE, NFKB1 or TNFAIP3 in the meta-analysis of the Scandinavian and UK cohorts. We conclude that polymorphisms in TNIP1 are associated with antibody-positive primary SS.

  • 24. Oliveira, Mariana
    et al.
    Baptista, Marisa
    Keszei, Marton
    Snapper, Scott
    Forsell, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Thrasher, Adrian
    Andersson, John
    Westerberg, Lisa
    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates antigen processing and presentation by dendritic cells2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 254-255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ou, Gangwei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Baranov, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Lundmark, E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Contribution of intestinal epithelial cells to innate immunity of the human gut: studies on polarized monolayers of colon carcinoma cells2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 150-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to establish an in vitro model for studies of innate defence mechanisms of human intestinal epithelium. Ultrastructural characterization and determination of mRNA expression levels for apical glycocalyx and mucous components showed that polarized, tight monolayers of the colon carcinoma cell lines T84 and Caco2 acquire the features of mature- and immature columnar epithelial cells, respectively. Polarized monolayers were challenged with non-pathogenic Gram+ and Gram- bacteria from the apical side and the proinflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) from the basolateral side. Immune responses were estimated as changes in mRNA expression levels for the mucous component mucin-2 (MUC2), the glycocalyx components carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CEA-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1), CEACAM6, CEACAM7 and MUC3, the antimicrobial factors human beta-defensin-1 (hBD1), hBD2, hBD3 and lysozyme, the chemokine IL-8 and the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Tight monolayer cells were generally unresponsive to bacterial challenge, but increased their hBD2 levels when challenged with Bacillus megaterium. T84 cells also increased their TNF-alpha levels upon bacterial challenge. Tight monolayer cells responded to cytokine challenge suggesting awareness of basolateral attack. TNF-alpha induced significantly increased levels of IL-8 and TNF-alpha itself in both cell lines suggesting recruitment and activation of immune cells in the underlying mucosa in vivo. Cytokine challenge also increased levels of CEACAM1, which includes two functionally different forms, CEACAM1-L and CEACAM1-S. In T84 cells, IFN-gamma was selective for CEACAM1-L while TNF-alpha upregulated both forms. Increased CEACAM1 expression may influence epithelial function and communication between epithelial cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes.

  • 26. Salomonsson, Stina
    et al.
    Dzikaite, Vijole
    Zeffer, Elisabeth
    Eliasson, Håkan
    Ambrosi, Aurelie
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Fernlund, Eva
    Theander, Elke
    Ohman, Annika
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Elfving, Ase
    Fored, Michael
    Ekbom, Anders
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mellander, Mats
    Winqvist, Ola
    Sonesson, Sven-Erik
    Gadler, Fredrik
    Jonzon, Anders
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    A population-based investigation of the autoantibody profile in mothers of children with atrioventricular block2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 511-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to investigate the antigen specificity and occurrence of individual autoantibodies in mothers of children diagnosed with atrioventricular (AV) block in a nation-wide setting. Patients with AV block detected before 15 years of age were identified using national quality registries as well as a network of pediatric and adult cardiologists and rheumatologists at the six university hospitals in Sweden. Patients with gross heart malformations, surgically or infectiously induced blocks were excluded. Blood samples were obtained from the mothers and maternal autoantibody profile, including the occurrence of antibodies against Ro52, Ro60, La, SmB, SmD, RNP-70k, RNP-A, RNP-C, CENP-C, Scl-70, Jo-1, ribosomal RNP and histones was investigated in 193 mothers of children with AV block by immunoblotting and ELISA. Autoantibody reactivity was detected in 48% (93/193) of the mothers of children with AV block. In autoantibody-positive mothers, the vast majority, 95% (88/93), had antibodies against Ro52, while 63% (59/93) had autoantibodies to Ro60 and 58% (54/93) had autoantibodies to La. In addition, 13% (12/93) of the autoantibody-positive mothers had antibodies to other investigated antigens besides Ro52, Ro60 and La, and of these anti-histone antibodies were most commonly represented, detected in 8% (7/93) of the mothers. In conclusion, this Swedish population-based study confirm that maternal autoantibodies may associate with heart block in the child. Further, our data demonstrate a dominant role of Ro52 antibodies in association with AV block.

  • 27. Seppänen, M
    et al.
    Lokki, IL
    Notkola, LM
    Mattila, K
    Valtonen, V
    Nieminen, A
    Vesanen, M
    Asikainen, Sirkka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Meri, S
    Complement and c4 null alleles in severe chronic adult periodontitis.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 176-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe forms of chronic periodontitis affect up to 10% of adults. Tumour necrosis factor and lymphotoxin-alpha genes in the major histocompatibility complex are associated with severe periodontitis. Complement factor C4 is a nearby, polymorphic, functionally relevant gene region. Although associated with chronic mucosal infections, C4 deficiencies have not been assessed in adult periodontitis patients. We tested whether complement levels are systemically altered and C4 deficiencies associated with severe chronic periodontitis. In a case-control study, we analysed levels of plasma C3, and C4, serum classical pathway haemolytic activity, C4 allotypes and C4 gene numbers in 37 patients with severe chronic periodontitis and in 150 voluntary controls. Plasma levels of C3 were higher, and classical pathway haemolytic activity was lower in patients than in controls. Partial C4 gene deficiencies were more frequent in patients than in controls (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.1-5.5, P = 0.032). Changes in complement levels may reflect chronic, recurring inflammation. C4 gene deficiencies are associated with predisposition to chronic periodontitis.

  • 28.
    Strigård, Karin
    et al.
    Division of Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Larsson, Per
    Holmdahl, Rikard
    Höjeberg, B
    Klareskog, Lars
    Elimination of CD8+ T cells in vivo does not break induced immunospecific tolerance to experimental allergic neuritis in rats.1988In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 325-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of CD8+ T 'cytotoxic/suppressor' T cells in induced immunospecific tolerance and during recovery after actively induced disease was examined by means of elimination of CD8+ cells from Lewis rats using in vivo treatment by Ox8 monoclonal antibodies, in experimental allergic neuritis (EAN). Animals depleted of CD8+ T cells after recovery from EAN did not show any clinical signs of relapse. Other animals were pretreated with the peripheral nerve basic protein P2 and thereby rendered resistant to disease induction with a potentially neuritogenic emulsion. The elimination of CD8+ T cells did not result in EAN here either. Thus, the CD8+ T-cell population does not seem to participate in the suppression of this autoimmune disease under these experimental conditions.

  • 29. Sundqvist, Emilie
    et al.
    Sundström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Bomfim, Izaura
    Hillert, Jan
    Aldresson, Lars
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Olsson, Tomas
    The Influence of Host Genetics on Epstein-Barr Virus Specific Antibody Levels in Multiple Sclerosis Patients and Controls2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 201-202Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Söderström, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Colucci, F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Bergqvist, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Establishment and characterization of RAG-2 deficient non-obese diabetic mice1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 525-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors have established a new immunodeficient mouse strain on the genetic background of the diabetes prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. A deletion mutant of the RAG-2 gene was back crossed 10 generations onto the NOD/Bom strain background. The homozygous NODrag-2-/- mice lack functionally mature B and T lymphocytes and do not develop insulitis or diabetes throughout life. In contrast, heterozygous NODrag-2+/- develop both insulitis and diabetes with an incidence similar to the wild type NOD mice. In transfer experiments, spleen cells from diabetic NOD donors were found to transfer disease to NODrag-2-/- recipients similar to what has been previously observed in transfer to irradiated NOD recipients or to immunodeficient NOD-scid/scid mice. While resembling the recently established NOD-scid/scid mice in many respects, the NODrag-2-/- mice represents an advantageous model for reconstitution of the pathogenesis of murine IDDM as it does not produce any endogenous, mature T or B lymphocytes.

  • 31. Tauriainen, Johanna
    et al.
    Maleki, Kimia
    Blom, Kim
    Bjorkstrom, Niklas
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf
    Klingstrom, Jonas
    Inverse expression of the inhibitory/activating receptors TIGIT/CD226 on CD8 T cells in acute HFRS2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 291-291Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Thyagarajan, Radha
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    B Cells and IgE in Type 1 Diabetes2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 452-452Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33. Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    et al.
    Worku, S
    Tangteerawatana, P
    Jamshaid, R
    Söderström, K
    Elghazali, G
    Moretta, L
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Human gamma delta T cells that inhibit the in vitro growth of the asexual blood stages of the Plasmodium falciparum parasite express cytolytic and proinflammatory molecules.1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 642-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The functional properties, regarding parasite growth inhibition in vitro, the cytotoxic potential and cytokine profiles of human gammadelta+ and alphabeta+ T cells, T-cell lines and clones stimulated with Plasmodium falciparum-antigen-or T-cell mitogen in vitro were investigated. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and specific primers, mRNA for the cytolytic molecules perforin, granzyme A and B, Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) were detected in both the gammadelta- and the alphabetaT cells. Despite this fact, only gammadeltaT cells inhibited, both Vdelta1+ and Vdelta2+, the in vitro growth of the asexual blood stages in a dose dependent manner. The inhibition required cell-to-cell contact and was not observed until the second parasite replication implied that the likely gammadeltaT-cell target was the extracellular merozoite or schizont. The failure of alphabetaT cells to inhibit the growth of the parasite suggests requirement of additional cytolytic molecules/signals or different receptor specificities exhibited by the gammadeltaT cells. Both the gammadelta- and alphabetaT cells expressed mRNA for a large number of cytokines. Interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL) IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), tumour necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta)/lymphotoxin (LT) and T-cell growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta1) were observed in all activated clones tested. No IL-3 was detected, while IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and GM-CSF were variably expressed. In conclusion, our data show that gammadeltaT cells in malaria nonimmune individuals inhibit the asexual blood stages of P. falciparum malaria, while similarly activated alphabetaT cells do not. Thus, it is likely that the gammadeltaT cells could play a mandatory role in the elimination of parasites and/or the regulation of the early immune response to malaria infection.

  • 34.
    Ulvila, J
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Hultmark, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Rämet, M
    Institute of Medical Technology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    RNA silencing in the antiviral innate immune defence--role of DEAD-box RNA helicases2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 146-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RNA silencing is an efficient biochemical tool for gene knock downs as well as physiological phenomenon playing a major role in diverse biological processes. Recent knowledge suggests that the same protein families which mediate the experimental RNA interference (RNAi) in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster cells also contribute to the antiviral host defence in both invertebrate model organisms and mammals. Additionally, another branch of RNA silencing, the microRNAs (miRNAs), has been recently described in the context of host defence. In several studies, miRNAs have been shown to regulate essential immune responses. This review summarizes basic concepts of RNAi and miRNAs, especially in the context of immune defence, focusing on the newly discovered role of DEAD-box helicases in the RNA interference and antiviral host defence.

  • 35.
    Waltraud, Schrottmaier
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Anna-Liisa, Luik
    Manuel, Salzmann
    Sigrun, Badrnya
    Susanne, Morava
    Julia, Kral-Pointner
    Mikael, Karlsson
    Alice, Assinger
    Mattias, Forsell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Activation of circulating platelets leads to innate-like delivery of potent antiviral antibodies2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 278-278Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Widhe, M
    et al.
    Ekerfelt, C
    Jarefors, S
    Skogman, B H
    Peterson, E M
    Bergström, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Forsberg, P
    Ernerudh, J
    T-cell epitope mapping of the Borrelia garinii outer surface protein A in lyme neuroborreliosis.2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 141-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the T-cell reactivity to overlapping peptides of B. garinii OspA, in order to locate possible immunodominant T-cell epitopes in neuroborreliosis. Cells from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood from 39 patients with neuroborreliosis and 31 controls were stimulated with 31 overlapping peptides, and interferon-gamma secreting cells were detected by ELISPOT. The peptides OspA(17-36), OspA(49-68), OspA(105-124), OspA(137-156), OspA(193-212) and OspA(233-252) showed the highest frequency of positive responses, being positive in CSF from 38% to 50% of patients with neuroborreliosis. These peptides also elicited higher responses in CSF compared with controls (P = 0.004). CSF cells more often showed positive responses to these peptides than blood cells (P = 0.001), in line with a compartmentalization to the central nervous system. Thus, a set of potential T-cell epitopes were identified in CSF cells from patients with neuroborreliosis. Further studies may reveal whether these epitopes can be used diagnostically and studies involving HLA interactions may show their possible pathogenetic importance.

  • 37. Zhang, Lu
    et al.
    Hu, Jin
    Zirakzadeh, Ali
    Rosvall, Jesper
    Hedlund, Mats
    Hu, Pingsheng
    Wallin, Robert
    Sherif, Amir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Immune responses against Human Papilloma virus in draining lymph nodes from patients with penile cancer2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 339-339Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 37 of 37
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