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  • 1. Abbara, Aula
    et al.
    Rawson, Timothy M.
    Karah, Nabil
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    El-Amin, Wael
    Hatcher, James
    Tajaldin, Bachir
    Dar, Osman
    Dewachi, Omar
    Abu Sitta, Ghassan
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Sparrow, Annie
    A summary and appraisal of existing evidence of antimicrobial resistance in the Syrian conflict2018Inngår i: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1201-9712, E-ISSN 1878-3511, Vol. 75, s. 26-33Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in populations experiencing war has yet to be addressed, despite the abundance of contemporary conflicts and the protracted nature of twenty-first century wars, in combination with growing global concern over conflict-associated bacterial pathogens. The example of the Syrian conflict is used to explore the feasibility of using existing global policies on AMR in conditions of extreme conflict. The available literature on AMR and prescribing behaviour in Syria before and since the onset of the conflict in March 2011 was identified. Overall, there is a paucity of rigorous data before and since the onset of conflict in Syria to contextualize the burden of AMR. However, post onset of the conflict, an increasing number of studies conducted in neighbouring countries and Europe have reported AMR in Syrian refugees. High rates of multidrug resistance, particularly Gram-negative organisms, have been noted amongst Syrian refugees when compared with local populations. Conflict impedes many of the safeguards against AMR, creates new drivers, and exacerbates existing ones. Given the apparently high rates of AMR in Syria, in neighbouring countries hosting refugees, and in European countries providing asylum, this requires the World Health Organization and other global health institutions to address the causes, costs, and future considerations of conflict-related AMR as an issue of global governance. (c) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of International Society for Infectious Diseases.

  • 2. Abbara, Aula
    et al.
    Rawson, Timothy M.
    Karah, Nabil
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    El-Amin, Wael
    Hatcher, James
    Tajaldin, Bachir
    Dar, Osman
    Dewachi, Omar
    Abu Sitta, Ghassan
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Sparrow, Annie
    Antimicrobial resistance in the context of the Syrian conflict: Drivers before and after the onset of conflict and key recommendations2018Inngår i: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1201-9712, E-ISSN 1878-3511, Vol. 73, s. 1-6Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Current evidence describing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in the context of the Syrian conflict is of poor quality and sparse in nature. This paper explores and reports the major drivers of AMR that were present in Syria pre-conflict and those that have emerged since its onset in March 2011. Drivers that existed before the conflict included a lack of enforcement of existing legislation to regulate over-the-counter antibiotics and notification of communicable diseases. This contributed to a number of drivers of AMR after the onset of conflict, and these were also compounded by the exodus of trained staff, the increase in overcrowding and unsanitary conditions, the increase in injuries, and economic sanctions limiting the availability of required laboratory medical materials and equipment. Addressing AMR in this context requires pragmatic, multifaceted action at the local, regional, and international levels to detect and manage potentially high rates of multidrug-resistant infections. Priorities are (1) the development of a competent surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections, (2) antimicrobial stewardship, and (3) the creation of cost-effective and implementable infection control policies. However, it is only by addressing the conflict and immediate cessation of the targeting of health facilities that the rehabilitation of the health system, which is key to addressing AMR in this context, can progress. 

  • 3. Balasingam, Shobana
    et al.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technology University, Singapore 308232, Singapore.
    Randomized controlled trials for influenza drugs and vaccines: a review of controlled human infection studies2016Inngår i: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1201-9712, E-ISSN 1878-3511, Vol. 49, s. 18-29Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Controlled human infection, the intentional infection of healthy volunteers, allows disease pathogenesis to be studied and vaccines and therapeutic interventions to be evaluated in a controlled setting. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials of countermeasures for influenza that used the experimental human infection platform was performed. The primary objective was to document the scope of trials performed to date and the main efficacy outcome in the trials. The secondary objective was to assess safety and identify serious adverse events.

    METHODS: The PubMed database was searched for randomized controlled influenza human challenge studies with predetermined search terms. Review papers, papers without outcomes, community-acquired infections, duplicated data, pathogenesis studies, and observational studies were excluded.

    RESULTS: Twenty-six randomized controlled trials published between 1947 and 2014 fit the study inclusion criteria. Two-thirds of these trials investigated antivirals and one-third investigated influenza vaccines. Among 2462 subjects inoculated with influenza virus, the incidence of serious adverse events was low (0.04%). These challenge studies helped to down-select three antivirals and one vaccine that were subsequently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

    CONCLUSIONS: Controlled human infection studies are an important research tool in assessing promising influenza vaccines and antivirals. These studies are performed quickly and are cost-effective and safe, with a low incidence of serious adverse events.

  • 4. Mosomtai, Gladys
    et al.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Virologi.
    Sandström, Per
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Infektionssjukdomar.
    Sang, Rosemary
    Hassan, Osama Ahmed
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Virologi.
    Affognon, Hippolyte
    Landmann, Tobias
    Association of ecological factors with Rift Valley fever occurrence and mapping of risk zones in Kenya2016Inngår i: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1201-9712, E-ISSN 1878-3511, Vol. 46, s. 49-55Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne infection with great impact on animal and human health. The objectives of this study were to identify ecological factors that explain the risk of RVF outbreaks in eastern and central Kenya and to produce a spatially explicit risk map. Methods: The sensitivity of seven selected ecological variables to RVF occurrence was assessed by generalized linear modelling (GLM). Vegetation seasonality variables (from normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data) and 'evapotranspiration' (ET) (metrics) were obtained from 0.25-1 km MODIS satellite data observations; 'livestock density' (N/km(2)), 'elevation' (m), and 'soil ratio' (fraction of all significant soil types within a certain county as a function of the total area of that county) were used as covariates. Results: 'Livestock density', 'small vegetation integral', and the second principal component of ET were the most significant determinants of RVF occurrence in Kenya (all p < 0.01), with high RVF risk areas identified in the counties of Tana River, Garissa, Isiolo, and Lamu. Conclusions: Wet soil fluxes measured with ET and vegetation seasonality variables could be used to map RVF risk zones on a sub-regional scale. Future outbreaks could be better managed if relevant RVF variables are integrated into early warning systems. 

  • 5. Yezli, Saber
    et al.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Lee Kong Chain School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Bin Saeed, Abdulaziz A
    Carriage of Neisseria meningitidis in the Hajj and Umrah mass gatherings2016Inngår i: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1201-9712, E-ISSN 1878-3511, Vol. 47, s. 65-70Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Meningococcal disease is a serious public health threat, especially during mass gatherings such as Hajj and Umrah which provide optimal conditions for disease transmission. The disease is caused by Neisseria meningitidis and transmitted mainly via asymptomatic carriers. A review of the literature on asymptomatic N. meningitidis carriage among Hajj and Umrah pilgrims and their household contacts was performed. Carriage studies reported carriage rates to be higher in Hajj pilgrims compared to Umrah pilgrims and that these events promote acquisition of carriage among pilgrims. With some outliers, most studies found carriage rates among pilgrims to be comparable to those in populations under non-epidemic settings. However, these results should be interpreted with caution, taking into account the limitations within the studies identified. A wide variety of N. meningitidis serogroups appear to be circulating among Hajj and Umrah pilgrims, with serogroups W135 and B being most prominent. Current Hajj and Umrah meningococcal disease preventative measures do not necessarily prevent carriage and transmission, which may result in local and international outbreaks among susceptible populations. Monitoring carriage states of visitors and local inhabitants in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, as well as the implementation of preventive measures that impact carriage, are warranted to reduce the risk of Hajj and Umrah-related meningococcal disease outbreaks.

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