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  • 1. Arver, Brita
    et al.
    Isaksson, Karin
    Atterhem, Hans
    Baan, Annika
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Brandberg, Yvonne
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Emanuelsson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Hellborg, Henrik
    Henriksson, Karin
    Karlsson, Per
    Loman, Niklas
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Ringberg, Anita
    Askmalm, Marie Stenmark
    Wickman, Marie
    Sandelin, Kerstin
    Bilateral Prophylactic Mastectomy in Swedish Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer: A National Survey2011In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 253, no 6, p. 1147-1154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objective: This study attempted a national inventory of all bilateral prophylactic mastectomies performed in Sweden between 1995 and 2005 in high-risk women without a previous breast malignancy. The primary aim was to investigate the breast cancer incidence after surgery. Secondary aims were to describe the preoperative risk assessment, operation techniques, complications, histopathological findings, and regional differences. Methods: Geneticists, oncologists and surgeons performing prophylactic breast surgery were asked to identify all women eligible for inclusion in their region. The medical records were reviewed in each region and the data were analyzed centrally. The BOADICEA risk assessment model was used to calculate the number of expected/prevented breast cancers during the follow-up period. Results: A total of 223 women operated on in 8 hospitals were identified. During a mean follow-up of 6.6 years, no primary breast cancer was observed compared with 12 expected cases. However, 1 woman succumbed 9 years post mastectomy to widespread adenocarcinoma of uncertain origin. Median age at operation was 40 years. A total of 58% were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. All but 3 women underwent breast reconstruction, 208 with implants and 12 with autologous tissue. Four small, unifocal, invasive cancers and 4 ductal carcinoma in situ were found in the mastectomy specimens. The incidence of nonbreast related complications was low(3%). Implant loss due to infection/necrosis occurred in 21 women (10%) but a majority received a new implant later. In total, 64% of the women underwent at least 1 unanticipated secondary operation.

  • 2. Dahlstrand, Ursula
    et al.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Wollert, Staffan
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden and Gastro Center Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chronic pain after femoral hernia repair: a cross-sectional study2011In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 254, no 6, p. 1017-1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the prevalence of and to identify possible risk factors for chronic pain after surgery for femoral hernia.

    Background: Chronic pain has become a very important outcome in quality assessment of inguinal hernia surgery. There are no studies on the risk for chronic pain after femoral hernia surgery. Methods: The Inguinal Pain Questionnaire was sent to 1967 patients who had had a repair for primary unilateral femoral hernia between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2006. A follow-up period of at least 18 months was chosen. Answers from 1461 patients were matched with data recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register and analyzed.

    Results: Some degree of pain during the previous week was reported by 24.2% (354) of patients. Pain interfered with daily activities in 5.5% (81) of patients. Emergency surgery (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.40-0.74) and longer time since surgery (OR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.89-0.98 for each year added) were associated with lower risk for chronic postoperative pain, whereas a high level of preoperative pain was associated with a higher risk for chronic pain (OR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.10-1.25). Surgical technique was not found to influence the risk for chronic pain in multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    Conclusions: Chronic postoperative pain is as important a complication after femoral hernia surgery as it is after inguinal hernia surgery. In contrast to inguinal hernia surgery, no risk factor related to surgical technique was found. Further investigations into the role of preoperative pain are necessary.

  • 3.
    Dahlstrand, Ursula
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wollert, Staffan
    Department of Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Division of Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Division of Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Emergency femoral hernia repair: a study based on a national register.2009In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 249, no 4, p. 672-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of femoral hernias and outcome of femoral repairs, with special emphasis on emergency operations. BACKGROUND: Femoral hernias account for 2% to 4% of all groin hernias. However, the lack of large-scale studies has made it impossible to draw conclusions regarding the best management of these hernias. METHODS: The study is based on patients 15 years or older who underwent groin hernia repair 1992 to 2006 at units participating in the Swedish Hernia Register. RESULTS: Three thousand nine hundred eighty femoral hernia repairs were registered, 1490 on men and 2490 on women: 1430 (35.9%) patients underwent emergency surgery compared with 4.9% of the 138,309 patients with inguinal hernias. Bowel resection was performed in 22.7% (325) of emergent femoral repairs and 5.4% (363) of emergent inguinal repairs. Women had a substantial over risk for undergoing emergency femoral surgery compared with men (40.6% vs. 28.1%). An emergency femoral hernia operation was associated with a 10-fold increased mortality risk, whereas the risk for an elective repair did not exceed that of the general population. In elective femoral hernias, laparoscopic (hazard ratio, 0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.67) and open preperitoneal mesh (hazard ratio, 0.28; confidence interval, 0.12-0.65) techniques resulted in fewer re-operations than suture repairs. CONCLUSIONS: Femoral hernias are more common in women and lead to a substantial over risk for an emergency operation, and consequently, a higher rate of bowel resection and mortality. Femoral hernias should be operated with high priority to avoid incarceration and be repaired with a mesh.

  • 4.
    Franklin, Oskar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Billing, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Öhlund, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nyström, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lundin, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Plasma micro-RNA alterations appear late in pancreatic cancer2018In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 267, no 4, p. 775-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to study whether plasma microRNAs (miRNA) can be used for early detection of pancreatic cancer (PC) by analyzing prediagnostic plasma samples collected before a PC diagnosis. Background: PC has a poor prognosis due to late presenting symptoms and early metastasis. Circulating miRNAs are altered in PC at diagnosis but have not been evaluated in a prediagnostic setting. Methods: We first performed an initial screen using a panel of 372 miRNAs in a retrospective case-control cohort that included early-stage PC patients and healthy controls. Significantly altered miRNAs at diagnosis were then measured in an early detection case-control cohort wherein plasma samples in the cases are collected before a PC diagnosis. Carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (Ca 19–9) levels were measured in all samples for comparison. Results: Our initial screen, including 23 stage I-II PC cases and 22 controls, revealed 15 candidate miRNAs that were differentially expressed in plasma samples at PC diagnosis. We combined all 15 miRNAs into a multivariate statistical model, which outperformed Ca 19–9 in receiver-operating characteristics analysis. However, none of the candidate miRNAs, individually or in combination, were significantly altered in prediagnostic plasma samples from 67 future PC patients compared with 132 matched controls. In comparison, Ca 19–9 levels were significantly higher in the cases at <5 years before diagnosis. Conclusion: Plasma miRNAs are altered in PC patients at diagnosis, but the candidate miRNAs found in this study appear late in the course of the disease and cannot be used for early detection of the disease.

  • 5.
    Fränneby, Ulf
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Department of Surgery, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala.
    Nordin, Pär
    Department of Surgery, östersunds Sjukhus, östersund.
    Nyrén, Olof
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Department of Surgery, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risk factors for long-term pain after hernia surgery2006In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 244, no 2, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of residual pain 2 to 3 years after hernia surgery, to identify factors associated with its occurrence, and to assess the consequences for the patient.

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Iatrogenic chronic pain is a neglected problem that may totally annul the benefits from hernia repair.

    METHODS: From the population-based Swedish Hernia Register 3000 patients aged 15 to 85 years were sampled from the 9280 patients registered as having undergone a primary groin hernia operation in the year 2000. Of these, the 2853 patients still alive in 2003 were requested to fill in a postal questionnaire.

    RESULTS: After 2 reminders, 2456 patients (86%), 2299 men and 157 women responded. In response to a question about "worst perceived pain last week," 758 patients (31%) reported pain to some extent. In 144 cases (6%), the pain interfered with daily activities. Age below median, a high level of pain before the operation, and occurrence of any postoperative complication were found to significantly and independently predict long-term pain in multivariate logistic analysis when "worst pain last week" was used as outcome variable. The same variables, along with a repair technique using anterior approach, were found to predict long-term pain with "pain right now" as outcome variable.

    CONCLUSION: Pain that is at least partly disabling appears to occur more often than recurrences. The prevalence of long-term pain can be reduced by preventing postoperative complications. The impact of repair technique on the risk of long-term pain shown in our study should be further assessed in randomized controlled trials.

  • 6. Gutlic, Nihad
    et al.
    Rogmark, Peder
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Petersson, Ulf
    Montgomery, Agneta
    Impact of mesh fixation on chronic pain in total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair (TEP): a nationwide register-based study2016In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 263, no 6, p. 1199-1206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mesh fixation is used to prevent recurrence at the potential risk for chronic pain in TEP. The aim was to compare the impact of permanent fixation (PF) with no fixation (NF)/nonpermanent fixation (NPF) of mesh on chronic pain after TEP repair for primary inguinal hernia.

    METHODS: Men, 30 to 75 years old, consecutively registered in the Swedish Hernia Register for a TEP primary repair in 2005 to 2009, were included in a mail survey using SF-36 and the Inguinal Pain Questionnaire (IPQ). Primary endpoint was IPQ question "Did you have pain during past week that could not be ignored." Risk factors for chronic pain and recurrent operations were analyzed.

    RESULTS: A total of 1110 patients were included (325 PF, 785 NF/NPF) with 7.7% reporting pain at median 33 months follow-up. No difference regarding primary endpoint pain (P < 0.462), IPQ and SF-36 subscales were seen. Recurrent operation was carried out in 1.4% during 7.5 years follow-up with no difference between PF- and NF-groups including subgroups of medial hernias. All SF-36 subscale-scores were equal to or better than the Swedish norm. A postoperative complication was a risk factor for chronic pain (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.23-5.25, P < 0.023).

    CONCLUSIONS: The TEP procedure for primary inguinal hernia repair in men is associated with a low frequency of chronic pain and recurrent operations, with no difference between permanent fixation and no/nonpermanent fixation of mesh in a nationwide population-based study. TEP without fixation reduces costs and is safe for all patients.

  • 7.
    Haapaniemi, S
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrkoping, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, P
    Nilsson, E
    Reoperation after recurrent groin hernia repair.2001In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 234, no 1, p. 122-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze reoperation rates for recurrent and primary groin hernia repair documented in the Swedish Hernia Register from 1996 to 1998, and to study variables associated with increased or decreased relative risks for reoperation after recurrent hernia.

    METHODS: Data were retrieved for all groin hernia repairs prospectively recorded in the Swedish Hernia register from 1996 to 1998. Actuarial analysis adjusted for patients' death was used for calculating the cumulative incidence of reoperation. Relative risk for reoperation was estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model.

    RESULTS: From 1996 to 1998, 17,985 groin hernia operations were recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register, 15% for recurrent hernia and 85% for primary hernia. At 24 months the risk for having had a reoperation was 4.6% after recurrent hernia repair and 1.7% after primary hernia repair. The relative risk for reoperation was significantly lower for laparoscopic methods and for anterior tension-free repair than for other techniques. Postoperative complications and direct hernia were associated with an increased relative risk for reoperation. Day-case surgery and local infiltration anesthesia were used less frequently for recurrent hernia than for primary hernia.

    CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent groin hernia still constitutes a significant quantitative problem for the surgical community. This study supports the use of mesh by laparoscopy or anterior tension-free repair for recurrent hernia operations.

  • 8.
    Lundström, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Östersunds Hosp, Dept Surg, S-83183 Östersund, Sweden.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Smedberg, Sam
    Helsingborg Hosp, Dept Surg, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Risk factors for complications in Groin Hernia surgery: A National register study2012In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 255, no 4, p. 784-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aims to analyze and identify risk factors for postoperative complications and analyze the relative risk of reoperation for recurrence for respective complication. Background: The outcome of groin hernia surgery is evaluated mostly by comparing recurrence rates and long-term pain. The aim of this observational population-based registry study was to identify risk factors for postoperative complications and analyze the relative risk of reoperation for recurrence for respective complication. Methods: Using data from the nationwide Swedish Hernia Register between 1998 and 2009, 150,514 herniorrhaphies were analyzed with respect to postoperative complications occurring within 30 days of surgery. Results: Risk factors significantly affecting the rate of postoperative complications were laparoscopic repair (odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-1.47) and open preperitoneal techniques (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.15-1.49), with open anterior mesh as reference category. Other significant risk factors were general (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.23-1.37) and regional anesthesia (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.43-1.63), with local anesthesia as reference category, emergency procedures (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.43-1.63); recurrent hernia repair (OR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.27-1.52); femoral hernia (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.14-1.48); aged older than 65 years (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.21-1.31); and duration of surgery exceeding 50 minutes (OR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.22-1.33). Conclusions: Open anterior approach and surgery under local anesthesia are associated with less risk of postoperative complications.

  • 9.
    Lundström, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Östersunds Hosp, Dept Surg, S-83183 Östersund, Sweden.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Smedberg, Sam
    Helsingborg Hosp, Dept Surg, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Risk factors for complications in Groin Hernia surgery: A National register study2012In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 255, no 4, p. 784-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aims to analyze and identify risk factors for postoperative complications and analyze the relative risk of reoperation for recurrence for respective complication. Background: The outcome of groin hernia surgery is evaluated mostly by comparing recurrence rates and long-term pain. The aim of this observational population-based registry study was to identify risk factors for postoperative complications and analyze the relative risk of reoperation for recurrence for respective complication. Methods: Using data from the nationwide Swedish Hernia Register between 1998 and 2009, 150,514 herniorrhaphies were analyzed with respect to postoperative complications occurring within 30 days of surgery. Results: Risk factors significantly affecting the rate of postoperative complications were laparoscopic repair (odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-1.47) and open preperitoneal techniques (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.15-1.49), with open anterior mesh as reference category. Other significant risk factors were general (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.23-1.37) and regional anesthesia (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.43-1.63), with local anesthesia as reference category, emergency procedures (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.43-1.63); recurrent hernia repair (OR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.27-1.52); femoral hernia (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.14-1.48); aged older than 65 years (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.21-1.31); and duration of surgery exceeding 50 minutes (OR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.22-1.33). Conclusions: Open anterior approach and surgery under local anesthesia are associated with less risk of postoperative complications.

  • 10. Mörner, Malin E M
    et al.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Egenvall, Monika
    Reply to Letter: "Analyzing the Influence of Blood Loss on Outcomes of Cancer Surgery"2015In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 261, no 3, p. E70-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Mörner, Malin E M
    et al.
    Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jestin, Pia
    Department of Surgical Sciences, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svanfeldt, Monika
    Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The importance of blood loss during colon cancer surgery for long-term survival: an epidemiological study based on a population based register2012In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 255, no 6, p. 1126-1128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study tested the hypothesis that the amount of blood loss during surgery for colonic cancer influences long-term survival.

    BACKGROUND: The perioperative blood loss during surgery for colorectal cancer relates to the risk for complications and early mortality.

    METHODS: All patients who underwent surgery for colon cancer between 1997 and 2003 in the health-care region of Uppsala/Örebro were prospectively registered at the regional oncological center. Data on patients who underwent radical surgery for stages I to III disease were analyzed. Patients who died within 6 months after surgery were excluded. Hazard ratios were calculated with uni- and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. Because of covariation, blood loss, blood transfusion, and complications were tested in separate multivariate analyses.

    RESULTS: Blood loss of 250 mL or more during surgery, male gender, occurrence of complications, age more than 75 years, and stage III disease were risk factors for overall mortality in the uni- and multivariate analyses. Perioperative blood transfusion was shown to be a risk factor in the univariate analysis only.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results support the hypothesis that degree of blood loss during surgery for colon cancer is a factor that influences long-term survival.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Stranne, Johan
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Incidence of groin hernia repair after radical prostatectomy: a population-based nationwide study2014In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 259, no 6, p. 1223-1227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the incidence of groin hernia repair after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer compared with the incidence in a control population without prostate cancer in a nationwide, population-based study.

    Background: Recent reports indicate an increase in the incidence of groin hernia repair after radical prostatectomy. Inadequate knowledge of the incidence of groin hernia in the general population makes this information hard to interpret.

    Methods: Information was retrieved from the Prostate Cancer Database (PCBaSe) and Swedish Hernia Register for events between 1998 and 2010. The incidence of groin hernia surgery was calculated for a group of men treated with radical prostatectomy (open and minimally invasive) and for a group treated with radiation therapy, and these were compared with the incidence in a control cohort of men matched for age and county of residence. Multivariate analysis was used to assess the hazard ratio (HR) of groin hernia repair according to age, tumor risk category, and Charlson Comorbidity Index.

    Results: A total of 28,608 cases and 105,422 controls were included in the study. Men treated with radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy had a significantly higher incidence of groin hernia repair than the control cohort: HR: 3.95 (95% confidence interval: 3.70-4.21) for retropubic prostatectomy, HR: 3.37 (95% confidence interval: 2.95-3.87) for minimally invasive prostatectomy, and HR: 1.84 (95% confidence interval: 1.66-2.04) for radiation therapy.

    Conclusions: An almost 4-fold increase in groin hernia repair was observed after radical prostatectomy compared with controls, and men who received radiation therapy had an almost 2-fold increase in incidence. As well as postoperative changes in the abdominal wall, increased vigilance for groin hernia seems to be important for the increased incidence of groin hernia repair seen after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospitalt, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stylianidis, Georgios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Haapamäki, Markku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nilsson, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Mortality after groin hernia surgery2007In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 245, no 4, p. 656-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To analyze mortality following groin hernia operations.

    Summary Background Data: It is well known that the incidence of groin hernia in men exceeds the incidence in women by a factor of 10. However, gender differences in mortality following groin hernia surgery have not been explored in detail.

    Methods: The study comprises all patients 15 years or older who underwent groin hernia repair between January 1, 1992 and December 31, 2005 at units participating in the Swedish Hernia Register (SHR). Postoperative mortality was defined as standardized mortality ratio (SMR) within 30 days, ie, observed deaths of operated patients over expected deaths considering age and gender of the population in Sweden.

    Results: A total of 107,838 groin hernia repairs (103,710 operations), were recorded prospectively. Of 104,911 inguinal hernias, 5280 (5.1%) were treated emergently, as compared with 1068 (36.5%) of 2927 femoral hernias. Femoral hernia operations comprised 1.1% of groin hernia operations on men and 22.4% of operations on women. After femoral hernia operation, the mortality risk was increased 7-fold for both men and women. Mortality risk was not raised above that of the background population for elective groin hernia repair, but it was increased 7-fold after emergency operations and 20-fold if bowel resection was undertaken. Overall SMR was 1.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-1.6) for men and 4.2 (95% confidence interval, 3.2-5.4) for women, in accordance with a greater proportion of emergency operations among women compared with men, 17.0%, versus 5.1%.

    Conclusions: Mortality risk following elective hernia repair is low, even at high age. An emergency operation for groin hernia carries a substantial mortality risk. After groin hernia repair, women have a higher mortality risk than men due to a greater risk for emergency procedure irrespective of hernia anatomy and a greater proportion of femoral hernia.

  • 14.
    Odensten, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Strigård, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Dahlberg, Michael
    Ståhle, Ulrika
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Näsvall, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Response to ANNSURG-D-17-02433.2018In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Odensten, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Strigård, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Dahlberg, Michael
    Ståhle, Ulrika
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Näsvall, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Use of prophylactic mesh when creating a colostomy does not prevent parastomal hernia: a randomized controlled trial—STOMAMESH2017In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether parastomal hernia (PSH) rate can be reduced by using synthetic mesh in the sublay position when constructing permanent end colostomy. The secondary aim was to investigate possible side-effects of the mesh.

    Background: Prevention of PSH is important as it often causes discomfort and leakage from stoma dressing. Different methods of prevention have been tried, including several mesh techniques. The incidence of PSH is high; up to 78%.

    Methods: Randomized controlled double-blinded multicenter trial. Patients undergoing open colorectal surgery, including creation of a permanent end colostomy, were randomized into 2 groups, with and without mesh. A lightweight polypropylene mesh was placed around the colostomy in the sublay position. Follow up after 1 month and 1 year. Computerized tomography and clinical examination were used to detect PSH at the 1-year follow up. Data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis.

    Results: After 1 year, 211 of 232 patients underwent clinical examination and 198 radiologic assessments. Operation time was 36 minutes longer in the mesh arm. No difference in rate of PSH was revealed in the analyses of clinical (P = 0.866) and radiologic (P = 0.748) data. There was no significant difference in perioperative complications.

    Conclusions: The use of reinforcing mesh does not alter the rate of PSH. No difference in complication rate was seen between the 2 arms. Based on these results, the prophylactic use of mesh to prevent PSH cannot be recommended.

  • 16. Rosemar, Anders
    et al.
    Angerås, Ulf
    Rosengren, Annika
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Effect of body mass index on groin hernia surgery.2010In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 252, no 2, p. 397-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of underweight, overweight, and obesity in relation to clinical characteristics, the risk of postoperative complications, 30-day mortality, and reoperations for recurrence after groin hernia surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Groin hernia surgery is one of the most frequent operations performed in general surgery. Several studies have demonstrated a protective effect of overweight and obesity on the risk of developing primary groin hernia. However, obesity has also been suggested to increase the risk for recurrence of groin hernia. METHODS: Through the Swedish Hernia Register, 49,094 primary groin hernia operations were identified between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007. Patients were divided into 4 body mass index (BMI) groups: BMI 1, <20 kg/m2; BMI 2, 20 to 25 kg/m2; BMI 3, 25-30 kg/m2; and BMI 4, >30 kg/m2. RESULTS: Of the 49,094 patients, 3.5% had a BMI <20 kg/m2 and 5.2% were obese. Altogether, women constituted only 7.7% of the studied group, but among patients with BMI <20 kg/m2 that had surgical procedures for femoral hernia, 81.4% were women. The relation between BMI and postoperative complications was U-shaped and after adjustment for age, gender, and emergency procedure, patients with BMI <20 and >25 had a significant increased risk when compared with patients with BMI from 20 to 25. Reoperation for recurrence of groin hernia has an increased hazard ratio of 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.40) in overweight, which was particularly evident after open suture and preperitoneal mesh techniques. CONCLUSIONS: In this large and unselected population of patients with a first surgical procedure for groin hernia a relative dominance of female and femoral hernias presented as an emergency condition was observed in the low BMI group. The prevalence of obesity was markedly low. Both lean and obese patients had an increased risk for postoperative complications.

  • 17.
    Sevonius, Dan
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    CLINTEC, Division of Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nilsson, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Repeated groin hernia recurrences.2009In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 249, no 3, p. 516-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of patients undergoing multiple groin hernia repairs and to identify strategies that prevent further recurrence. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although relatively infrequent, recurrent groin hernias where several repairs have previously been undertaken constitutes a major problem in hernia surgery. Low numbers and heterogeneity have made it difficult to perform large prospective studies on this group. METHODS: The study was designed as an observational population-based register study. All repairs for recurrent hernia recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register (SHR) 1992-2006 were identified. Risk for reoperation by number of previous repairs, with adjustment for gender and age, and risk for reoperation by unit responsible for previous repair were determined using Cox proportional hazard analysis. RESULTS: There were 12,104 cases of hernia repaired once, 2 repairs in 4199 cases, 3 repairs in 310 cases, 4 repairs in 32 cases, and 5 repairs in 3 cases. The risk for further reoperation increased with the number of previous repairs (P < 0.001). The hazard ratios for reoperation following open preperitoneal mesh repair and laparoscopic repair decreased; whereas, the hazard ratio for sutured repair increased with the number of previous repairs. The difference between Lichtenstein repair and laparoscopic repair was significant for the first 2 repairs (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic preperitoneal repair provides the best surgical outcome in repeated groin hernia recurrence.

  • 18.
    Westin, Linn
    et al.
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wollert, Staffan
    Department of Surgical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ljungdahl, Mikael
    Department of Surgical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Dahlstrand, Ursula
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Less Pain 1 Year After Total Extra-peritoneal Repair Compared With Lichtenstein Using Local Anesthesia: data From a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial2016In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 263, no 2, p. 240-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to compare long-term postoperative pain after inguinal hernia surgery using 2 techniques that have shown favorable long-term outcome in previous randomized studies: Lichtenstein using local anesthesia (LLA) and endoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair (TEP) under general anesthesia.

    BACKGROUND: Patients often experience pain after inguinal hernia surgery. These 2 methods in their optimal state have not yet been sufficiently compared.

    METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to detect any difference in long-term postoperative inguinal pain. Altogether 384 patients were randomized and operated using either TEP under general anesthesia (n = 193) or LLA (n = 191). One year postoperatively, patients were examined by an independent surgeon and requested to complete the Inguinal Pain Questionnaire (IPQ), a validated questionnaire for the assessment of postoperative inguinal pain.

    RESULTS: Three hundred seventy-five (97.7%) patients completed follow-up at 1 year. In the TEP group, 39 (20.7%) patients experienced pain, compared with 62 (33.2%) patients in the LLA group (P = 0.007). Severe pain was reported by 4 patients in the TEP group and 6 patients in the LLA group (2.1% and 3.2%, respectively, P = 0.543). Pain in the operated groin limited the ability to exercise for 5 TEP patients and 14 LLA patients (2.7% and 7.5%, respectively, P = 0.034).

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients operated with TEP experienced less long-term postoperative pain and less limitation in their ability to exercise than those operated with LLA. The present data justify recommending TEP as the procedure of choice in the surgical treatment of primary inguinal hernia.

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