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  • 1.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Danish Research Center for Magnetic Research (DRCMR), Centre forFunctional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen Univer-sity Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Non-invasive brain stimulation and neuro-enhancement in aging2018In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 9, p. 464-465Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Heldestad, Victoria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Sellersjö, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nordh, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Reproducibility and influence of test modality order on thermal perception and thermal pain thresholds in quantitative sensory testing2010In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 121, no 11, p. 1878-1885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The findings show that QST with the MLI is a reliable tool for indirect evaluation of human small nerve fiber function.

  • 3. Kariuki, Symon M.
    et al.
    White, Steven
    Chengo, Eddie
    Wagner, Ryan G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Box 2 Cornhoek 1360, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A.
    Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina
    Masanja, Honorati
    Ngugi, Anthony K.
    Sander, Josemir W.
    Neville, Brian G.
    Newton, Charles R.
    Electroencephalographic features of convulsive epilepsy in Africa: A multicentre study of prevalence, pattern and associated factors2016In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 127, no 2, p. 1099-1107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We investigated the prevalence and pattern of electroencephalographic (EEG) features of epilepsy and the associated factors in Africans with active convulsive epilepsy (ACE).

    Methods: We characterized electroencephalographic features and determined associated factors in a sample of people with ACE in five African sites. Mixed-effects modified Poisson regression model was used to determine factors associated with abnormal EEGs.

    Results: Recordings were performed on 1426 people of whom 751 (53%) had abnormal EEGs, being an adjusted prevalence of 2.7 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.5–2.9) per 1000. 52% of the abnormal EEG had focal features (75% with temporal lobeinvolvement). The frequency and pattern of changes differed with site. Abnormal EEGs were associated with adverse perinatal events (risk ratio (RR) = 1.19 (95% CI, 1.07–1.33)), cognitive impairments (RR = 1.50 (95% CI, 1.30–1.73)), use of anti-epilepticdrugs (RR = 1.25 (95% CI, 1.05–1.49)), focal seizures (RR = 1.09 (95% CI, 1.00–1.19)) and seizure frequency (RR = 1.18 (95% CI, 1.10–1.26) for daily seizures; RR = 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10–1.35) for weekly seizures and RR = 1.15 (95% CI, 1.03–1.28) for monthly seizures)).

    Conclusions: EEG abnormalities are common in Africans with epilepsy and are associated with preventable risk factors.

    Significance: EEG is helpful in identifying focal epilepsy in Africa, where timing of focal aetiologies is problematic and there is a lack of neuroimaging services.

  • 4.
    Stewart, Heather G
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Eisen, Andrew
    Weber, Markus
    Corticomotoneuronal dysfunction in ALS patients with different SOD1 mutations.2006In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 117, no 8, p. 1850-1861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine corticomotoneuronal function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients carrying superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations using peristimulus time histograms (PSTH). METHODS: Six I113T, 3 A4V, one G41D and one G114A patient were studied along with 21 healthy control subjects. Analyses included comparison with previously reported data from 8 D90A homozygous and 12 sporadic ALS (SALS) patients examined by the authors using identical methodology. RESULTS: Cortical threshold was significantly reduced in A4V patients (41.3%) compared to I113T (58%), SALS (57%) and D90A (71%) patients, as well as healthy controls (49.7%). Estimated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were significantly larger in A4V patients (4.39 mV) compared to healthy controls (2.95 mV), I113T (2.71 mV) and SALS (2.39 mV) patients. Clinical features and PSTH parameters in I113T were similar to SALS, however, PSTH primary peaks (PP) were significantly more dispersed, 9.5 ms compared to 4ms in SALS. PSTHs from single G41D and G114A patients were unremarkable, apart from large EPSP amplitudes in the G114A patient. CONCLUSIONS: ALS patients with A4V and I113T SOD1 mutations have distinctive corticomotoneuronal changes that are different from those in D90A homozygous and SALS patients. SIGNIFICANCE: PSTH studies should be considered for future in vivo studies of SOD1 pathophysiology in ALS.

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