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  • 1. Budhiraja, Meenal
    et al.
    Pereira, Joana B.
    Lindner, Philip
    Westman, Eric
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Psychiatry Building R5:00, Karolinska, University Hospital, Stockholm 171 76, Sweden.
    Savic, Ivanka
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Hodgins, Sheilagh
    Cortical structure abnormalities in females with conduct disorder prior to age 152019In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 289, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among females, conduct disorder (CD) before age 15 is associated with multiple adverse outcomes in adulthood. The few existing structural neuroimaging studies of females with CD report abnormalities of gray matter volumes. The present study compared cortical thickness and surface area of young women with childhood/adolescent CD and healthy women to determine whether cortical abnormalities were present in adulthood and whether they were related to prior CD. Structural brain images from 31 women with CD and 25 healthy women were analyzed using FreeSurfer. Group differences between cortical thickness and surface area were assessed using cluster-wise corrections with Monte Carlo simulations. Women with prior CD, relative to healthy women, showed: (1) reduced cortical thickness in left fusiform gyrus extending up to entorhinal cortex and lingual gyrus; (2) reduced surface area in right superior parietal cortex; (3) increased surface area in left superior temporal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus. These differences remained significant after adjusting for past comorbid disorders, current symptoms of anxiety and depression, current substance use as well as maltreatment. The study suggests that among females, CD prior to age 15 is associated with cortical structure abnormalities in brain regions involved in emotion processing and social interaction.

  • 2.
    Fernandes, Carla Patricia Duarte
    et al.
    K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Dr. Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Westlye, Lars Tjelta
    K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Norwegian Centre For Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0317, Norway.
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Dr. Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Christoforou, Andrea
    K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Dr. Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Kauppi, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University and Stockholm Brain Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Lundervold, Astri Johansen
    Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, K.G. Jebsen Centre for Research on Neuropsychiatric Disorders, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, Kavli Research Centre for Aging and Dementia, Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital.
    Reinvang, Ivar
    Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0317, Norway.
    Steen, Vidar Martin
    K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Dr. Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Le Hellard, Stéphanie
    K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Dr. Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Espeseth, Thomas
    K.G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Norwegian Centre For Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0317, Norway.
    Lack of association of the rs1344706 ZNF804A variant with cognitive functions and DTI indices of white matter microstructure in two independent healthy populations2014In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 222, no 1-2, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rs1344706 single nucleotide polymorphism within intron 2 of the ZNF804A gene is strongly associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This variant has also been associated in some studies with a range of cognitive and neuroimaging phenotypes, but several studies have reported no effect on the same phenotypes in other samples. Here, we genotyped 670 healthy adult Norwegian subjects and 1753 healthy adult Swedish subjects for rs1344706, and tested for associations with cognitive phenotypes including general intellectual abilities, memory functions and cognitive inhibition. We also tested whether rs1344706 is associated with white matter microstructural properties using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from 250 to 340 of the Norwegian and Swedish subjects, respectively. Whole-brain voxel-wise statistical modeling of the effect of the ZNF804A variant on two DTI indices, fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD), was performed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), and commonly reported effect sizes were calculated within several large-scale white matter pathways based on neuroanatomical atlases. No significant associations were found between rs1344706 and the cognitive traits or white matter microstructure. We conclude that the rs1344706 SNP has no significant effect on these phenotypes in our two reasonably powered samples.

  • 3.
    Malmberg Gavelin, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Stigsdotter Neely, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Eskilsson, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Slunga Järvholm, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Neural activation in stress-related exhaustion: cross-sectional observations and interventional effects2017In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 269, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the association between burnout and neural activation during working memory processing in patients with stress-related exhaustion. Additionally, we investigated the neural effects of cognitive training as part of stress rehabilitation. Fifty-five patients with clinical diagnosis of exhaustion disorder were administered the n-back task during fMRI scanning at baseline. Ten patients completed a 12-week cognitive training intervention, as an addition to stress rehabilitation. Eleven patients served as a treatment-as-usual control group. At baseline, burnout level was positively associated with neural activation in the rostral prefrontal cortex, the posterior parietal cortex and the striatum, primarily in the 2-back condition. Following stress rehabilitation, the striatal activity decreased as a function of improved levels of burnout. No significant association between burnout level and working memory performance was found, however, our findings indicate that frontostriatal neural responses related to working memory were modulated by burnout severity. We suggest that patients with high levels of burnout need to recruit additional cognitive resources to uphold task performance. Following cognitive training, increased neural activation was observed during 3-back in working memory-related regions, including the striatum, however, low sample size limits any firm conclusions.

  • 4.
    Månsson, Kristoffer NT
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University.
    Olsson, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Bodlund, Owe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Furmark, Thomas
    Uppsala University.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University.
    Altered neural correlates of affective processing after internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder2013In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 214, no 3, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Randomized controlled trials have yielded promising results for internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) forpatients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). The present study investigated anxiety-related neural changes after iCBT for SAD. The amygdala is a critical hub in the neural fear network, receptive to change using emotion regulation strategies and a putative target for iCBT.

    Twenty-two subjects were included in pre- and post-treatment functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T assessingneural changes during an affective face processing task. Treatment outcome was assessed using social anxiety self-reports and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale.

    ICBT yielded better outcome than ABM (66% vs. 25% CGI-I responders). A significant differential activation of the left amygdala was found with relatively decreased reactivity after iCBT. Changes in the amygdala were related to a behavioral measure of social anxiety. Functional connectivity analysis in the iCBT group showed that the amygdala attenuation was associated with increased activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and decreased activity in the right ventrolateral and dorsolateral (dlPFC) cortices. Treatment-induced neural changes with iCBT were consistent with previously reported studies on regular CBT and emotion regulation in general.

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