umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 94
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Anderson, M
    et al.
    Domellöf, L
    Eksborg, S
    Häggmark, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Johansson, G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Reiz, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Herslöf, Å
    Pharmacokinetics and Central Haemodynamic Effects of Doxorubicin and 4'Epi-Doxorubicin in the Pig1989In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 28, no 5, 709-714 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Kristin
    et al.
    Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malm ö , Sweden.
    Bray, Freddie
    Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
    Arbyn, Marc
    Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Scientifi c Institute of Public Health, Brussels, Belgium.
    Storm, Hans
    Cancer Prevention and Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Zanetti, Roberto
    Piedmont Cancer Registry – CPO, Torino, Italy.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Coebergh, Jan W
    Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Dillner, Joakim
    Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    The interface of population-based cancer registries and biobanks in etiological and clinical research: current and future perspectives2010In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 49, no 8, 1227-1234 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The availability of quality assured, population-based cancer registries and biobanks with high quality samples makes it possible to conduct research on large samples sets with long follow-up within a reasonable time frame. Defined quality for both cancer registries and biobanks is essential for enabling high quality biobank-based research. Recent networking projects have brought these infrastructures together to promote the combined use of cancer registries and biobanks in cancer research.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this report we review the current status and future perspectives of cancer registries and biobanks and how the interface between them should be developed to optimally further cancer research.

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Major conclusions for future improvements are that the research exploiting cancer registries and biobanks, and the research that is building and optimising the infrastructure, should evolve together for maximally relevant progress. Population-based and sustainable biobanks that continuously and consecutively store all samples ("Biological registries") under strict quality control are needed. There is also a need for increased education, information and visibility of the interdisciplinary sciences required for optimal exploitation of these resources.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta
    Hjalmars, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Genetic variants in association studies: review of strengths and weaknesses in study design and current knowledge of impact on cancer risk2009In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 48, no 7, 948-954 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sequencing of the human genome has recently been completed and mapping of the complete genomic variation is ongoing. During the last decade there has been a huge expansion of studies of genetic variants, both with respect to association studies of disease risk and for studies of genetic factors of prognosis and treatments response, i.e., pharmacogenomics. The use of genetics to predict a patient's risk of disease or treatment response is one step toward an improved personalised prevention and screening modality for the prevention of cancer and treatment selection. The technology and statistical methods for completing whole genome tagging of variants and genome wide association studies has developed rapidly over the last decade. After identifying the genetic loci with the strongest, statistical associations with disease risk, future studies will need to further characterise the genotype-phenotype relationship to provide a biological basis for prevention and treatment decisions according to genetic profile. This review discusses some of the general issues and problems of study design; we also discuss challenges in conducting valid association studies in rare cancers such as paediatric brain tumours, where there is support for genetic susceptibility but difficulties in assembling large sample sizes. The clinical interpretation and implementation of genetic association studies with respect to disease risk and treatment is not yet well defined and remains an important area of future research.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Schwartzbaum, Judith
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Sjöström, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Liu, Yanhong
    Tsavachidis, Spyros
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Auvinen, Anssi
    Collatz-Laier, Helle
    Feychting, Maria
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Kiuru, Anne
    Lönn, Stefan
    Schoemaker, Minouk J
    Swerdlow, Anthony J
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    A comprehensive study of the association between the EGFR and ERBB2 genes and glioma risk2010In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 49, no 6, 767-775 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioma is the most common type of adult brain tumor and glioblastoma, its most aggressive form, has a dismal prognosis. Receptor tyrosine kinases such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, ERBB4) family, and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), play a central role in tumor progression. We investigated the genetic variants of EGFR, ERBB2, VEGFR and their ligands, EGF and VEGF on glioma and glioblastoma risk. In addition, we evaluated the association of genetic variants of a newly discovered family of genes known to interact with EGFR: LRIG2 and LRIG3 with glioma and glioblastoma risk. Methods. We analyzed 191 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) capturing all common genetic variation of EGF, EGFR, ERBB2, LRIG2, LRIG3, VEGF and VEGFR2 genes. Material from four case-control studies with 725 glioma patients (329 of who were glioblastoma patients) and their 1 610 controls was used. Haplotype analyses were conducted using SAS/Genetics software. Results. Fourteen of the SNPs were significantly associated with glioma risk at p< 0.05, and 17 of the SNPs were significantly associated with glioblastoma risk at p< 0.05. In addition, we found that one EGFR haplotype was related to increased glioblastoma risk at p=0.009, Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.67 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14, 2.45). The Bonferroni correction made all p-values non-significant. One SNP, rs4947986 next to the intron/exon boundary of exon 7 in EGFR, was validated in an independent data set of 713 glioblastoma and 2 236 controls, [OR] = 1.42 (95% CI: 1.06,1.91). Discussion. Previous studies show that regulation of the EGFR pathway plays a role in glioma progression but the present study is the first to find that certain genotypes of the EGFR gene may be related to glioblastoma risk. Further studies are required to reinvestigate these findings and evaluate the functional significance.

  • 5.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergström, Åsa
    Kasper, Maria
    Ögren, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Toftgård, Rune
    Riklund, Katrine Åhlström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Early and persisting response to vismodegib in a patient with bone metastasizing medulloblastoma2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 4, 862-865 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmstrom, Annika
    Björ, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Blomquist, Erik
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Considerable improvement in survival for patients aged 60-84 years with high grade malignant gliomas - Data from the Swedish Brain Tumour Population-based Registry2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 5, 1043-1046 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmström, Annika
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Björ, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brain tumors in Sweden: Data from a population-based registry 1999-20122015In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 54, no 3, 377-384 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The Swedish brain tumor registry has, since it was launched in 1999, provided significant amounts of data on histopathological diagnoses and on important aspects of surgical and medical management of these patients. The purpose is mainly quality control, but also as a resource for research.

    Methods. Three Swedish healthcare regions, constituting 40% of the Swedish population, have had an almost complete registration. The following parameters are registered: diagnosis according to SNOMED/WHO classification, symptoms, performance status, pre- and postoperative radiology, tumor size and localization, extent of surgery and occurrence of postoperative complications, postoperative treatment, such as radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, other treatments, complications and toxicity, occurrence of reoperation/s, participation in clinical trials, multidisciplinary conferences and availability of a contact nurse.

    Results. Surgical radicality has been essentially constant, whereas the use of early (within 72 hours) postoperative CT and MRI has increased, especially for high-grade glioma, which is a reflection of quality of surgery. Survival of patients with high-grade glioma has increased, especially in the age group 60-69. Patients aged 18-39 years had a five-year survival of 40%. Waiting times for the pathological report has been slightly prolonged. Geographical differences do exist for some of the variables.

    Conclusion. Population-based registration is valuable for assessment of clinical management, which could have impact on patient care. As a result of short survival and/or the propensity to affect cognitive functions this patient group has considerable difficulties to make their voices heard in society. We therefore believe that a report like the present one can contribute to the spread of knowledge and increase the awareness for this patient group among caregivers and policy makers.

  • 8.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Shahidi, Saeed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Durable stabilization of three chordoma cases by bevacizumab and erlotinib2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 7, 980-984 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Bergqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Iderberg, Hanna
    Mesterton, Johan
    Bengtsson, Nils
    Wettermark, Bjorn
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm-Gotland, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Healthcare resource use, comorbidity, treatment and clinical outcomes for patients with primary intracranial tumors: a Swedish population-based register study2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 3, 405-414 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Primary intracranial tumors are relatively uncommon and heterogeneous, which make them challenging to study. We coupled data from unique Swedish population-based registries in order to deeper analyze the most common intracranical tumor types. Patient characteristics (e.g. comorbidities), care process measures like adherence to national guidelines, healthcare resource use and clinical outcome was evaluated.

    Materials and methods: A register-based study including several population-based registries for all patients living in Stockholm-Gotland, diagnosed with primary intracranial tumor between 2001 and 2013 was performed. Patient characteristics were captured and investigated in relation to survival, healthcare resource use (inpatient-, outpatient- and primary care) and treatment process.

    Results: High-grade glioma and meningioma were the most common tumor types and most patients (76%) were above the age of 40 in the patient population (n = 3664). Older age, comorbidity (Elixhauser comorbidity index) and type of tumor (high-grade glioma) were associated with lower survival rate and increased use of healthcare resources, analyzed for patients living in Stockholm (n = 3031). The analyses of healthcare use and survival showed no differences between males and females, when stratifying by tumor types. Healthcare processes were not always consistent with existing national treatment recommendations for patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 474) with regard to specified lead times, analyzed in the Swedish Brain Tumor Registry, as also observed at the national level.

    Conclusions: Age, comorbidity and high-grade gliomas, but not sex, were associated with decreased survival and increased use of healthcare resources. Fewer patients than aimed for in national guidelines received care according to specified lead times. The analysis of comprehensive population-based register data can be used to improve future care processes and outcomes.

  • 10.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Gävle Hospital, Center for Research & Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Holgersson, Georg
    Bondarenko, Igor
    Grechanaya, Elena
    Maximovich, Alexey
    Andor, Gyorgy
    Klockare, Maria
    Thureson, Marcus
    Jerling, Markus
    Harmenberg, Johan
    Phase II randomized study of the IGF-1R pathway modulator AXL1717 compared to docetaxel in patients with previously treated, locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 3, 441-447 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The primary objective of this study was to compare the progression-free survival (PFS) at 12 weeks between patients treated with IGF-1R pathway modulator AXL1717 (AXL) and patients treated with docetaxel (DCT).

    Material and methods: The study was conducted at 19 study centers in five countries. A total of 99 patients with previously treated, locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or adenocarcinoma (AC) subtypes in need of additional treatment were randomized and treated with either 300 or 400 mg of AXL as daily BID treatment (58 patients) or DCT given as 75 mg/m2 in three-week cycles (41 patients) as monotherapy in a 3:2 ratio for each NSCLC subtype. Patients were treated in the primary study treatment period for a maximum of four treatment cycles.

    Results: The 12-week PFS rate, median PFS and overall survival (OS), as well Kaplan-Meier hazard ratio for PFS and OS, did not show any statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. For the primary endpoint, the AXL group had a lower percentage of patients (25.9%) who were progression-free at Week 12 as compared to the DCT group (39.0%), although the difference was not statistically significant. The most notable difference in the incidence of treatment emergent adverse effects (TEAEs) was the lower incidence of treatment-related grade 3/4 neutropenia in patients treated with AXL.

    Conclusion: These results suggest neither of the treatments to be superior of the other when treating locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Considering the lower incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia in the AXL group this treatment warrants further research.

  • 11.
    Birgisson, Helgi
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Påhlman, Lars
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer: a systematic overview2007In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 46, no 4, 504-516 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer.

    METHODS: Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5 x 5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone.

    RESULTS: The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued.

  • 12. Björeland, Anders
    et al.
    Lindvall, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Gustavsson, Helen
    Bäck, Sven A J
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Bergenheim, Tommy A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Liquid ionization chamber calibrated gel dosimetry in conformal stereotactic radiotherapy of brain lesions2008In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 47, no 6, 1099-1109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypofractionated conformal stereotactic radiotherapy (HCSRT) is an established method of treating brain lesions such as arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and brain metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of treatment plans in the terms of dose distribution and absorbed dose for HCSRT.

    Methods and materials. Treatment plans for three different clinical intracerebral targets, AVMs, were transferred to a CT study of a spherical water filled phantom simulating the human head and recalculated for the phantom geometry using a standard treatment planning system utilizing a pencil beam algorithm for dose calculation. The calculated absorbed dose, relative three dimensional (3D) dose distribution and dose conformity were investigated using gel dosimetry normalized to liquid ionization chamber (LIC) measurements.

    Results. The measured absorbed dose to the dose reference point was found to be within 2% of the calculated dose for all three targets. The measured dose distribution was found to be within 3% and 2 mm of the calculated dose for more than 93% of all points in the target volume for all three targets.

    Conclusions. The results show that the investigated standard treatment planning system can correctly predict the absorbed dose and dose distribution in different types of intracerebral targets and that the treatment can be delivered according to the plan.

  • 13.
    Boström, Petrus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Haapamäki, Markku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    Rutegård, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Arterial ligation in anterior resection for rectal cancer: A validation study of the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 7, 892-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT Background. The level of arterial ligation has been a variable of the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry since 2007. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of this registry variable in relation to anterior resection for rectal cancer. Methods. The operative charts of all cardiovascularly compromised patients who underwent anterior resection during the period 2007-2010 in Sweden were retrieved and compared to the registry. We selected the study population to reflect the common assumption that these patients would be more sensitive to a compromised visceral blood flow. Levels of vascular ligation were defined, both oncologically and functionally, and their sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, level of agreement and Cohen's kappa were calculated. Results. Some 744 (94.5%) patients were eligible for analysis. Functional high tie level showed a sensitivity of 80.2% and a specificity of 90.1%. Positive and negative predictive values were 87.7 and 83.8%, respectively. Level of agreement was 85.5% and Cohen's kappa 0.70. The corresponding calculations for oncologic tie level yielded similar results. Conclusion. The suboptimal validity of the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry regarding the level of vascular ligation might be problematic. For analyses with rare positive outcomes, such bowel ischaemia, or with minor expected differences in outcomes, it would be beneficial to collect data directly from the operative charts of the medical records in order to increase the chance of identifying clinically relevant differences.

  • 14. Brandefors, Lena
    et al.
    Kimby, Eva
    Lundqvist, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Familial Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and relation to immune defects, autoimmune diseases, and haematological malignancies: a population-based study from northern Sweden2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 1, 91-98 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a rare lymphoprolipherative disorder with geographic and ethnic disparities in incidence. The cause of WM remains mostly unknown although a role for genetic, immune-related, and environmental factors has been suggested. Most cases of WM are sporadic although familial cases occur. Aim: This study estimated the incidence of WM in northern Sweden and identified and described patients with familial WM in this area. Patients and methods: The Swedish and Northern Lymphoma Registry, the Swedish Cancer Registry (1997-2011), and medical records were used to identify patients with WM in two counties (Norrbotten and Västerbotten) in northern Sweden and to calculate the overall age-adjusted incidence (2000-2012). We identified 12 families with a family history of WM, IgM monoclonal gammophathy (MGUS), and/or multiple myeloma (MM). Results: In Norrbotten and Västerbotten, the age-adjusted incidence of WM/LPL is 1.75 and 1.48 per 100 000 persons per year, respectively (2000-2012), rates that are higher than the overall incidence of WM/LPL in Sweden (1.05 per 100 000 persons per year; 2000-2012). Autoimmune diseases and other haematological malignancies in the medical history (their own or in relatives) were reported in 9/12 and 5/12 families, respectively. A high proportion of abnormal serum protein electrophoresis was found in the relatives; 12/56 (21%) had a MGUS and 13/56 (25%) showed abnormalities in the immunoglobulin levels (i.e. subnormal levels and poly/oligoclonality). Conclusion: The incidence of WM in Norrbotten and Västerbotten counties was higher than expected. We found a strong correlation between autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, other haematological malignancies, and familial WM and a high frequency of serum immunoglobulin abnormalities in the relatives of the WM patients, findings that strengthen the hypothesis that the aetiology of WM depends on both immune-related and genetic factors.

  • 15.
    Brännström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bjerregaard, Jon K
    Winbladh, Anders
    Nilbert, Mef
    Revhaug, Arthur
    Wagenius, Gunnar
    Mörner, Malin
    Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer2015In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 54, no 4, 447-453 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment.

    Material and methods. Of the 6760 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Sweden between 2007 and 2010, 78% were evaluated at a MDT. Factors that influenced whether a patient was discussed at a preoperative MDT conference were evaluated in 4883 patients, and the impact of MDT evaluation on the implementation of preoperative radiotherapy was evaluated in 1043 patients with pT3c-pT4 M0 tumours, and in 1991 patients with pN+ M0 tumours.

    Results. Hospital volume, i.e. the number of rectal cancer surgical procedures performed per year, was the major predictor for MDT evaluation. Patients treated at hospitals with < 29 procedures per year had an odds ratio (OR) for MDT evaluation of 0.15. Age and tumour stage also influenced the chance of MDT evaluation. MDT evaluation significantly predicted the likelihood of being treated with preoperative radiotherapy in patients with pT3c-pT4 M0 tumours (OR 5.06, 95% CI 3.08–8.34), and pN+ M0 (OR 3.55, 95% CI 2.60–4.85), even when corrected for co-morbidity and age.

    Conclusion. Patients with rectal cancer treated at high-volume hospitals are more likely to be discussed at a MDT conference, and that is an independent predictor of the use of adjuvant radiotherapy. These results indirectly support the introduction into clinical practice of discussing all rectal cancer patients at MDT conferences, not least those being treated at low-volume hospitals.

  • 16.
    Crnalic, Sead
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hildingsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Löfvenberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for neurological recovery after surgery for metastatic spinal cord compression in prostate cancer2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 4, 809-815 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Spinal cord compression is an oncological and surgical emergency. Delays in referral and diagnosis may influence functional outcome. It is therefore important to identify patients who will regain or maintain ability to walk after surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine current practice for referral and diagnosis of prostate cancer patients with spinal cord compression and to identify prognostic factors for neurological outcome after surgery.

    Patients and methods. The study includes 68 consecutive patients with prostate cancer who underwent surgery due to neurological compromise.  Intervals from onset of neurological symptoms to referral, diagnosis, and treatment were analyzed in relation to functional outcome. The prognostic significance of preoperative clinical parameters on gait function one month after surgery was evaluated.

    Results. Patients who were referred from local hospitals had longer delay to surgery than those who directly presented to the cancer centre (p=0.004). The rate of diagnosis with MRI increased through the week and peaked on Friday, with few patients being diagnosed during weekends. Ability to walk before surgery, hormone-naive prostate cancer, and/or shorter time from loss of ambulation were associated with more favorable neurological outcome. In patients with hormone-refractory disease who were unable to walk before surgery regaining of ambulation was associated with: duration of paresis <48 hours (p=0.005), good preoperative performance status (p=0.04), preoperative PSA serum level <200 ng/ml (p=0.03), and surgery with posterior decompression and stabilization (p=0.03).

    Conclusion. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment of spinal cord compression in prostate cancer patients is crucial for neurological recovery. Rising of awareness for the condition among patients at risk and among physicians is mandatory as well as improvement of local and regional guidelines for treatment.

  • 17.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    The effects of hypoxia on the theoretical modelling of tumour control probability2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 6, 563-571 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical modelling of tumour response is increasingly used for the prediction of treatment result and has even been proposed as ranking criteria in some algorithms for treatment planning. Tumour response to radiation is greatly influenced by the details of tumour microenvironment, especially hypoxia, that unfortunately are not always taken into consideration for these simulations. This paper intends to investigate the effects of various assumptions regarding hypoxia distribution in tumours on the predictions of treatment outcome. A previously developed model for simulating theoretically the oxygenation in biologically relevant tissues, including results from oxygen diffusion, consumption and perfusion limitations in tumours, was used to investigate the effects of the different aspects of hypoxia on the predictions of treatment outcome. Thus, both the continuous distribution of values and the temporal variation of hypoxia patterns were taken into consideration and were compared with a `black-and-white' simplification with a fully hypoxic compartment and a fully oxic one. It was found that the full distribution of oxygenation in the tissue is needed for accurate results. The `black-and-white' simplification, while showing the same general trends for the predictions of radiation response, could lead to serious overestimations of the tumour control probability. It was also found that the presence of some hypoxia for every treatment fraction leads to a decrease in the predicted local control, regardless of the change of the hypoxic pattern throughout the duration of the whole treatment. The results thus suggest that the assumptions regarding tumour hypoxia influence very much the predictions of treatment outcome and therefore they have to be very carefully incorporated into the theoretical modelling.

  • 18.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Olofsson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    The use of risk estimation models for the induction of secondary cancers following radiotherapy2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 4, 339-347 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical predictions of cancer risk from radiotherapy may be used as a complementary criterion for the selection of successful treatment plans together with the classical approach of estimating the possible deterministic effects. However, any such attempts must take into consideration the specific features of radiation treatment. This paper explores several possible methods for estimating the risk of cancer following radiotherapy in order to investigate the influences of the fractionation and the non-uniformity of the dose to the irradiated organ. The results indicate that dose inhomogeneity plays an important role in predicting the risk for secondary cancer and therefore for predictive purposes it must be taken into account through the use of the dose volume histograms. They also suggest that the competition between cell killing and the induction of carcinogenic mutations has to be taken into consideration for more realistic risk estimations. Furthermore, more realistic parameters could be obtained if this competition is also included in analyses of epidemiological data from radiotherapy applications.

  • 19. Edlund, Per
    et al.
    Ahlgren, Johan
    Bjerre, Karsten
    Andersson, Michael
    Bergh, Jonas
    Mouridsen, Henning
    Holmberg, Stig B
    Bengtsson, Nils-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jakobsen, Erik
    Møller, Susanne
    Lindman, Henrik
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Dose-tailoring of FEC adjuvant chemotherapy based on leukopenia is feasible and well tolerated. Toxicity and dose intensity in the Scandinavian Breast Group phase 3 adjuvant Trial SBG 2000-12011In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no 3, 329-337 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SBG 2000-1 trial is a randomised study that investigates if dose-tailored adjuvant FEC therapy based on the individual's leukocyte nadir value can improve outcome. The study has included 1535 women with medium and high-risk breast cancer. Patients and methods. After a first standard dosed FEC course (5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m2, epirubicin 60 mg/mg2 and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2), patients who did not reach leukopenia grade III or IV were randomised to standard doses (group standard) or doses tailored to achieve grade III leukopenia (group tailored) at courses 2–7. Patients who achieved leukopenia grade III or more after the first course were not randomised but continued on standard doses (group registered). Results. Both planned and actually delivered number of courses (seven) were the same in all three arms. The relative dose intensity was increased by a factor of 1.31 (E 1.22, C 1.43) for patients in the tailored arm compared to the expected on standard dose. Ninety percent of the patients in the tailored arm achieved leukopenia grade III–IV compared with 29% among patients randomised to standard dosed therapy. Dose tailoring was associated with acceptable acute non-haematological toxicity with more total alopecia, nausea, vomiting and fatigue. Conclusion. Dose tailoring according to leukopenia was feasible. It led to an increased dose intensity and was associated with acceptable excess of acute non-haematological toxicity.Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/0284186X.2011.554435

  • 20. Ekman, Simon
    et al.
    Harmenberg, Johan
    Frödin, Jan-Erik
    Bergström, Stefan
    Wassberg, Cecilia
    Eksborg, Staffan
    Larsson, Olle
    Axelson, Magnus
    Jerling, Markus
    Abrahmsen, Lars
    Hedlund, Åsa
    Alvfors, Carina
    Ståhl, Birgitta
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A novel oral insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor pathway modulator and its implications for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma: A phase I clinical trial2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 2, 140-148 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A phase Ia/b dose-escalation study was performed to characterize the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties of the oral small molecule insulin-like growth factor-1-receptor pathway modulator AXL1717 in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a prospective, single-armed, open label, dose-finding phase Ia/b study with the aim of single day dosing (phase Ia) to define the starting dose for multi-day dosing (phase Ib), and phase Ib to define and confirm recommended phase II dose (RP2D) and if possible maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for repeated dosing.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Phase Ia enrolled 16 patients and dose escalations up to 2900 mg BID were successfully performed without any dose limiting toxicity (DLT). A total of 39 patients were treated in phase Ib. AXL1717 was well tolerated with neutropenia as the only dose-related, reversible, DLT. RP2D dose was found to be 390 mg BID for four weeks. Some patients, mainly with NSCLC, demonstrated signs of clinical benefit, including four partial tumor responses (one according to RECIST and three according to PET). The 15 patients with NSCLC with treatment duration longer than two weeks with single agent AXL1717 in third or fourth line of therapy showed a median progression-free survival of 31 weeks and overall survival of 60 weeks. Down-regulation of IGF-1R on granulocytes and increases of free serum levels of IGF-1 were seen in patients treated with AXL1717. AXL1717 had an acceptable safety profile and demonstrated promising efficacy in this heavily pretreated patient cohort, especially in patients with NSCLC. RP2D was concluded to be 390 mg BID for four weeks. Trial number is NCT01062620.

  • 21.
    Fallbjörk, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Differences between women who have and have not undergone breast reconstruction after mastectomy due to breast cancer2010In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 49, no 2, 174-179 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study compares potential differences between women with breast cancer who after mastectomy had undergone breast reconstruction with those who had not. Material and methods: All women (N=149) in the northern medical region of Sweden who had undergone mastectomy in 2003 received a self-reported questionnaire entitled “Life After Mastectomy (LAM)” that included standardized measures of sociodemographic, decision-making process, breast reconstruction (BR) yes or no, sexuality, and body image. SPSS was used for data processing. Results: In total 85% of the women returned the questionnaire and of these 25% had undergone BR. In accordance with previous studies, we found that the mean age of the women in the BR group was significantly lower (52 vs. 64 years), they had a higher education, and a higher proportion were employed, influenced by the physician's opinion regarding BR, sexually active, and rated a negative impact concerning the factors attractiveness and body disclosure. A multiple regression analysis, however, showed that the choice to undergo breast reconstruction or not was only independently associated with age, feeling of attractiveness and sexual interest. Discussion: Age explained most differences found between the two groups. When researchers try to identify what differentiates the groups of women who undergo reconstruction between those who do not undergo reconstruction after mastectomy, it is thus necessary to take into consideration that the meanings of mastectomy, body image, attractiveness and similar variables may vary due to the phase of a woman's life. In conclusion, considering the impact of age is of paramount importance in future studies for our understanding of women's experiences.

  • 22.
    Franzén, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundström, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Gustafsson, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Littbrand, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Fractionated irradiation and early changes in noradrenaline induced potassium efflux(86Rb+) in rat parotid gland1992In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 31, no 3, 359-364 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of fractionated irradiation on the electrolyte fluid secretion from rat parotid gland were studied. Secretion was measured as noradrenaline stimulated potassium efflux in vitro with Rb-86+ as tracer for potassium. The irradiation was delivered either as a five-day schedule (total dose 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 Gy) or a two-day schedule (total dose 24, 32 Gy). The noradrenaline stimulated efflux was decreased in comparison with contralateral controls 10 days after the last irradiation. The effect was dose-dependent. Based on the data available, alpha/beta ratio of the used system was calculated to about 20 Gy, which corresponds to other results regarding early radiation effects.

  • 23. Funegård, Ulrika
    et al.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Cariology.
    Franzén, L
    Ericson, T
    Nyström, H
    Henriksson, R
    Rat salivary gland function after fractionated irradiation.1997In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 36, no 2, 191-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal effects of fractionated irradiation, with various total doses, on salivary gland function in the rat. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 4, 5, 6, 7 or 8 Gy per day on five consecutive days. Irradiation was given to the head and neck region. Whole saliva was collected before and 2, 15 and 26 weeks after irradiation. In general the effects of irradiation on salivary gland function were found to be related to dose and time after exposure. Secretion rates were significantly decreased two weeks after irradiation with doses of 30 Gy or higher, after 15 weeks with 25 Gy or higher, and after 26 weeks with 20 Gy or higher. Response patterns to irradiation differed between the salivary constituents. Thus, the conclusions from this study are that early and late effects display different patterns and that the model used to study variations in salivary gland function after fractionated irradiation must be adjusted to the question addressed.

  • 24. Glimelius, Bengt
    et al.
    Ask, Anders
    Bjelkengren, Göran
    Björk-Eriksson, Thomas
    Blomquist, Erik
    Johansson, Bengt
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Number of patients potentially eligible for proton therapy2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 8, 836-849 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A group of Swedish radiation oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy in a facility where one of the principal aims is to facilitate randomized and other studies in which the advantage of protons can be shown and the magnitude of the differences compared with optimally administered conventional radiation treatment, also including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy, can be shown. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence in Sweden, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours together with information on normal tissue complication rates. In Sweden, it is assessed that between 2200 and 2500 patients annually are eligible for proton beam therapy, and that for these patients the potential therapeutic benefit is so great as to justify the additional expense of proton therapy. This constitutes between 14- 15% of all irradiated patients annually.

  • 25. Hallén, Karin
    et al.
    Sangfelt, Per
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Nordgren, Hans
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Molin, Daniel
    Vanishing bile duct-like syndrome in a patient with Hodgkin lymphoma: pathological development and restitution2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 9, 1271-5 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Harmenberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Hamdy, Freddie C
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lennernäs, Bo
    Nilsson, Sten
    Curative radiation therapy in prostate cancer.2011In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no Suppl 1, 98-103 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiotherapy has experienced an extremely rapid development in recent years. Important improvements such as the introduction of multileaf collimators and computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning software have enabled three dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3DCRT). The development of treatment planning systems and technology for brachytherapy has been very rapid as well. Development of accelerators with integrated on-board imaging equipment and technology, for example image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has further improved the precision with reduced margins to adjacent normal tissues. This has, in turn, led to the possibility to administer even higher doses to the prostate than previously. Although radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy have been used for the last decades as curative treatment modalities, still there are no randomized trials published comparing these two options. Outcome data show that the two treatment modalities are highly comparable when used for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  • 27.
    Hedestig, Oliver
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Tomic, Radisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Living after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.: A qualitative analysis of patient narratives.2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 7, 679-686 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hedman, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lindström, Annika K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tot, Tibor
    Stendahl, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hellberg, Dan
    LRIG2 in contrast to LRIG1 predicts poor survival in early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix2010In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 49, no 6, 812-815 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The human leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) protein family comprises LRIG1, 2, and 3. LRIG1 negatively regulates growth factor signaling and is a proposed tumor suppressor. In early stage uterine cervical carcinoma, expression of LRIG1 is associated with good survival. Less is known about the function and expression of LRIG2; it has not been studied in cervical carcinoma, previously. MATERIALS AND METHODS: LRIG2 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in 129 uterine cervical squamous cell carcinomas and 36 uterine cervical adenocarcinomas. Possible associations between LRIG2 immunoreactivity and patient survival were evaluated. RESULTS: In early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (stages IB-IIB), high expression of LRIG2 was associated with poor survival (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank, p=0.02). The 10-year survival rate for patients with high expression of LRIG2 was 60%, compared to 87% in patients with low expression (odds ratio 0.22, 95% CI 0.07-0.64). In multivariate analysis including the previously studied tumor suppressor LRIG1 and clinical stage, LRIG2 emerged as an independent prognostic factor (odds ratio 0.22, 95% CI 0.09-0.50). For patients with both high expression of LRIG2 and low expression of LRIG1, the 10-year survival rate was only 26% compared to 66% for the remaining study population. There was no correlation between LRIG2 expression and prognosis in the limited adenocarcinoma series. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: LRIG2 appears to be a significant predictor of poor prognosis in early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A combination of high LRIG2 expression and low LRIG1 expression identified women with a very poor prognosis.

  • 29.
    Hedman, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Guo, Dongsheng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Is LRIG1 a tumour suppressor gene at chromosome 3p14.3?2002In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 41, no 4, 352-354 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The LRIG1 gene (formerly LIG-1), recently cloned by us, displays structural similarities to the Drosophila Kek I gene. Kek I encodes a cell surface protein, Kekkon-1, which inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signalling. We localized the LRIG1 gene to chromosome band 3p14.3, a region known to be deleted in various human cancers. In the present study LRIG1 gene expression was examined in different tumour cell lines and corresponding normal tissues by real-time RT-PCR. In many tumour cell lines, LRIG1 expression appeared absent or was down regulated compared to corresponding normal tissues. The results are consistent with LRIG1 being a tumour suppressor gene in humans. However, further studies are justified to elucidate the explicit role of LRIG1 as a negative regulator of oncogenesis.

  • 30. Holgersson, Georg
    et al.
    Hoye, Even
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Ekman, Simon
    Nyman, Jan
    Helsing, Martin
    Friesland, Signe
    Holgersson, Margareta
    Ekberg, Lars
    Blystad, Thomas
    Ewers, Sven-Börje
    Mörth, Charlotte
    Löden, Britta
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergström, Stefan
    Swedish Lung Cancer Radiation Study Group: Predictive value of age at diagnosis for radiotherapy response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer2012In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 51, no 6, 759-767 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of age at diagnosis on prognosis in patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for NSCLC. Material and methods. This is a joint effort among all the Swedish Oncology Departments that includes all identified patients with a diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer that have been subjected to curatively intended irradiation (>= 50 Gy) treated during 1990 to 2000. Included patients had a histopathological/cytological diagnosis date as well as a death date or a last follow-up date. The following variables were studied in relation to overall and disease-specific survival: age, gender, histopathology, time period, smoking status, stage and treatment. Results. The median overall survival of all 1146 included patients was 14.7 months, while the five-year overall survival rate was 9.5%. Younger patients (<55 years), presented with a more advanced clinical stage but had yet a significantly better overall survival compared with patients in the age groups 55-64 years (p = 0.035) and 65-74 years (p = 0.0097) in a multivariate Cox regression analysis. The overall survival of patients aged >= 75 years was comparable to those aged <55 years. Conclusion. In this large retrospective study we describe that patients younger than 55 years treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for NSCLC have a better overall survival than patients aged 55-64 and 65-74 years and that younger patients seem to benefit more from the addition of surgery and/or chemotherapy to radiotherapy. Due to the exploratory nature of the study, these results should be confirmed in future prospective trials.

  • 31. Holl, Katsiaryna
    et al.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Kaasila, Marjo
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Lehtinen, Matti
    Pukkala, Eero
    Surcel, Helja-Marja
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Koskela, Pentti
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Effect of long-term storage on hormone measurements in samples from pregnant women: the experience of the Finnish Maternity Cohort2008In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 47, no 3, 406-412 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Validity of biobank studies on hormone associated cancers depend on the extent the sample preservation is affecting the hormone measurements. We investigated the effect of long-term storage (up to 22 years) on immunoassay measurements of three groups of hormones and associated proteins: sex-steroids [estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, dihydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG)], pregnancy-specific hormones [human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), placental growth hormone (pGH), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)], and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family hormones exploiting the world largest serum bank, the Finnish Maternity Cohort (FMC). Hormones of interest were analyzed in a random sample of 154 Finnish women in the median age (29.5 years, range 25 to 34 years) of their first pregnancy with serum samples drawn during the first trimester. All hormone measurements were performed using commercial enzyme-linked- or radio-immunoassays. Storage time did not correlate with serum levels of testosterone, DHEAS, hCG, pGH and total IGFBP-1. It had a weak or moderate negative correlation with serum levels of progesterone (Spearman's ranked correlation coefficient (rs)=− 0.36), IGF-I (rs=−0.23) and IGF binding protein (BP)-3 (rs=−0.38), and weak positive correlation with estradiol (rs=0.23), SHBG (rs=0.16), AFP (rs=0.20) and non-phosphorylated IGF binding protein (BP)-1 (rs=0.27). The variation of all hormone levels studied followed the kinetics reported for early pregnancy. Bench-lag time (the time between sample collection and freezing for storage) did not materially affect the serum hormone levels. In conclusion, the stored FMC serum samples can be used to study hormone-disease associations, but close matching for storage time and gestational day are necessary design components of all related biobank studies.

  • 32. Hvidberg, Line
    et al.
    Lagerlund, Magdalena
    Pedersen, Anette F
    Hajdarevic, Senada
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Vedsted, Peter
    Awareness of cancer symptoms and anticipated patient interval for healthcare seeking. A comparative study of Denmark and Sweden2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 7, 917-924 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Recent epidemiologic data show that Denmark has considerably poorer survival from common cancers than Sweden. This may be related to a lower awareness of cancer symptoms and longer patient intervals in Denmark than in Sweden. The aims of this study were to: 1) compare population awareness of three possible symptoms of cancer (unexplained lump or swelling, unexplained bleeding and persistent cough or hoarseness); 2) compare anticipated patient interval when noticing any breast changes, rectal bleeding and persistent cough; and 3) examine whether potential differences were noticeable in particular age groups or at particular levels of education in a Danish and Swedish population sample.

    Method Data were derived from Module 2 of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership. Telephone interviews using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure were conducted in 2011 among 3000 adults in Denmark and 3070 adults in Sweden.

    Results Danish respondents reported a higher awareness of two of three symptoms (i.e. unexplained lump or swelling and persistent cough or hoarseness) and a shorter anticipated patient interval for two of three symptoms studied (i.e. any breast changes and rectal bleeding) than Swedish respondents. Differences in symptom awareness and anticipated patient interval between these countries were most pronounced in highly educated respondents.

    Conclusion Somewhat paradoxically, the highest awareness of symptoms of cancer and the shortest anticipated patient intervals were found in Denmark, where cancer survival is lower than in Sweden. Thus, it appears that these differences in symptom awareness and anticipated patient interval do not help explain the cancer survival disparity between Denmark and Sweden.

  • 33.
    Johansson, Adam
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Garpebring, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Asklund, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyholm, Tufve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Improved quality of computed tomography substitute derived from magnetic resonance (MR) data by incorporation of spatial information: potential application for MR-only radiotherapy and attenuation correction in positron emission tomography2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 7, 1369-1373 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Estimation of computed tomography (CT) equivalent data, i.e. a substitute CT (s-CT), from magnetic resonance (MR) images is a prerequisite both for attenuation correction of positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired with a PET/MR scanner and for dose calculations in an MR-only radiotherapy workflow. It has previously been shown that it is possible to estimate Hounsfield numbers based on MR image intensities, using ultra short echo-time imaging and Gaussian mixture regression (GMR). In the present pilot study we investigate the possibility to also include spatial information in the GMR, with the aim to improve the quality of the s-CT. Material and methods: MR and CT data for nine patients were used in the present study. For each patient, GMR models were created from the other eight patients, including either both UTE image intensities and spatial information on a voxel by voxel level, or only UTE image intensities. The models were used to create s-CT images for each respective patient. Results: The inclusion of spatial information in the GMR model improved the accuracy of the estimated s-CT. The improvement was most pronounced in smaller, complicated anatomical regions as the inner ear and post-nasal cavities. Conclusions: This pilot study shows that inclusion of spatial information in GMR models to convert MR data to CT equivalent images is feasible. The accuracy of the s-CT is improved and the spatial information could make it possible to create a general model for the conversion applicable to the whole body.

  • 34. Johansson, Amanda
    et al.
    Sandström, Per
    Ullén, Anders
    Erlandsson, Ann
    Sundström, Birgitta
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hietala, Sven-Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Stigbrand, Torgny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Stability and immunoreactivity of the monoclonal anticytokeratin antibody TS1 after different degrees of iodination.1999In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 38, no 3, 329-334 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immunoreactivity, stability and in vivo kinetics of an anticytokeratin 8 monoclonal antibody, TS1, were investigated following different degrees of labeling with 125I (0.2, 1 and 2-3 125I/TS1 MAb). By testing with ELISA, it was demonstrated that a high degree of iodination, i.e. > 2 125I/TS1, caused a rapid decrease in immunoreactivity to almost zero within 10 days. Furthermore, a complete degradation to low molecular weight fragments and free iodine was seen, as shown by SDS PAGE and autoradiography. The differently labeled radionuclide conjugates were injected into nude mice inoculated with HeLa Hep2 cells and tumor doses (estimated by MIRD formalism), tumor:non-tumor dose ratios, % I.D./gram tissue, Gy/MBq and in vivo kinetics of the differently labeled MAbs were determined. Despite the in vitro instability of the highest iodinated radionuclide conjugate, it was possible to deliver high doses to the tumors if the conjugate was injected into the animal immediately after completion of the iodination procedure. Increases from 1.4 Gy to 15.2 Gy delivered tumor dose were obtained with a tenfold increase in the specific activity, without alterations in the tumor:non-tumor tissue dose ratios. There is room for significant improvements in efficacy at radioimmunotherapy, which can be gained by optimizing the degree of iodination. For therapeutical applications a high degree of iodination may be an advantage.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Recent developments in brain tumor predisposing syndromes2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 4, 401-411 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The etiologies of brain tumors are in the most cases unknown, but improvements in genetics and DNA screening have helped to identify a wide range of brain tumor predisposition disorders. In this review we are discussing some of the most common predisposition disorders, namely: neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2, schwannomatosis, rhabdoid tumor predisposition disorder, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin), tuberous sclerosis complex, von Hippel-Lindau, Li-Fraumeni and Turcot syndromes. Recent findings from the GLIOGENE collaboration and the newly identified glioma causing gene POT1, will also be discussed. Genetics. We will describe these disorders from a genetic and clinical standpoint, focusing on the difference in clinical symptoms depending on the underlying gene or germline mutation. Central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Most of these disorders predispose the carriers to a wide range of symptoms. Herein, we will focus particularly on tumors affecting the CNS and discuss improvements of targeted therapy for the particular disorders.

  • 36.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Larsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Detection of Breast Cancer with Mammography in the First Screening Round in Relation to Expected Incidence in Different Age Groups2003In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 42, no 1, 22-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ratio (R) of prevalence of screening-detected breast cancer in the first screening round (P) was compared with the expected incidence rate (I) for different age groups in several screening programs. Published data on the first screening round from three Swedish randomized trials and six counties with service screening were used. The women invited to take part in the screening were aged 40/74 years. Not only P and I but also R increased with increasing age. With the youngest age group as reference, the increase was statistically significant for both invasive cancer and invasive cancer and carcinoma in situ together. The studied ratio (R) can be thought of as a measure of efficiency in detecting breast cancer cases in mammography screening. The reasons for the increase are probably that the breast tissue of younger women is denser, which makes the cancer more difficult to detect by mammography, and that slow-growing cancers tend to appear more frequently in older women.

  • 37.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Department of Oncology, Oncologic Centre, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Service Screening with Mammography in Sweden: Evaluation of Effects of Screening on Breast Cancer Mortality in Age Group 40–49 Years2000In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 39, no 5, 617-623 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to develop a model for estimating the effect of the nation-wide service screening program with mammography on breast cancer mortality in Sweden. In 1997, the introduction of population-based service screening had been completed in all 26 counties. In approximately half of the counties suitable for evaluation, the lower age limit for invitation was 40 years (study population) and in the other half the age limit was 50 years (control population). The numbers of females aged 40-49 years for the two populations were 202 152 and 237 279, respectively (1988). The study and control populations were compared for the period 1986-1996 with regard to refined breast cancer mortality. To adjust for geographical differences, the period 1976-1986 was used as reference. With a mean follow-up time of 8 years, the estimated relative risk of breast cancer death in relation to invitation to service screening among women aged 40-49 years at breast cancer diagnosis was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.72-1.15). These findings were compatible with those presented in the previous overview of the Swedish randomized studies.

  • 38. Jörgren, Fredrik
    et al.
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Centre North, Umeå University.
    Damber, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Centre North, Umeå University.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Validity of the Swedish Rectal Cancer Registry for patients treated with major abdominal surgery between 1995 and 19972013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 8, 1707-1714 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Founded in 1995, the Swedish Rectal Cancer Registry (SRCR) is frequently used for rectal cancer research. However, the validity of the registry has not been extensively studied. This study aims to validate a large amount of registry data to assess SRCR quality.

    Material and methods. The study comprises 906 patients treated with major abdominal surgery registered in the SRCR between 1995 and 1997. SRCR data for 14 variables were scrutinized for validity against the medical records. Kappa's and Kendall's correlation coefficients for agreement between SRCR data and medical records data were calculated for 13 variables.

    Results. For 11 variables, concerning the tumor, neoadjuvant therapy, the surgical procedure, local radicality and TNM stage, data were missing in 5% or less of the registrations; for the remaining three variables, anastomotic leakage, local and distant recurrence, data were missing in 13-38%. For the variables surgery performed or not and type of surgical procedure, no data were missing. Erroneous registrations were found in less than 10% of all variables; for the variables preoperative chemotherapy and surgery performed or not, all registrations were correct. For the variables concerning neoadjuvant therapy, local radicality according to the surgeon as well as the pathologist and distant metastasis, the false-positive or- negative registrations were equally distributed, and for the variables rectal washout, rectal perforation, anastomotic leakage and local recurrence there was a discrepancy in distribution. The correlation coefficient for 12 variables ranged from 0.82 to 1.00, and was 0.78 for the remaining variable.

    Conclusion. The validity of the SRCR was good for the initial three registry years. Thus, research based on SRCR data is reliable from the beginning of the registry's use.

  • 39. Kaiser, Franz-Joachim
    et al.
    Bassler, Niels
    Tölli, Heikki
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Jäkel, Oliver
    Initial recombination in the track of heavy charged particles: numerical solution for air filled ionization chambers2012In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 51, no 3, 368-375 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Modern particle therapy facilities enable sub-millimeter precision in dose deposition. Here, also ionization chambers (ICs) are used, which requires knowledge of the recombination effects. Up to now, recombination is corrected using phenomenological approaches for practical reasons. In this study the effect of the underlying dose distribution on columnar recombination, a quantitative model for initial recombination, is investigated.

    Material and methods. Jaffé's theory, formulated in 1913 quantifies initial recombination by elemental processes, providing an analytical (closed) solution. Here, we investigate the effect of the underlying charged carrier distribution around a carbon ion track. The fundamental partial differential equation, formulated by Jaffé, is solved numerically taking into account more realistic charge carrier distributions by the use of a computer program (Gascoigne 3D). The investigated charge carrier distributions are based on track structure models, which follow a 1∕r(2) behavior at larger radii and show a constant value at small radii. The results of the calculations are compared to the initial formulation and to data obtained in experiments using carbon ion beams.

    Results. The comparison between the experimental data and the calculations shows that the initial approach made by Jaffé is able to reproduce the effects of initial recombination. The amorphous track structure based charge carrier distribution does not reproduce the experimental data well. A small additional correction in the assessment of the saturation current or charge is suggested by the data.

    Conclusion. The established model of columnar recombination reproduces the experimental data well, whereas the extensions using track structure models do not show such an agreement. Additionally, the effect of initial recombination on the saturation curve (i.e. Jaffé plot) does not follow a linear behavior as suggested by current dosimetry protocols, therefore higher order corrections (such as the investigated ones) might be necessary.

  • 40.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Björk-Eriksson, Thomas
    Mattsson, Olof
    Mattsson, Sören
    Montelius, Anders
    Nilsson, Per
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    "Distributed proton radiation therapy'': a new concept for advanced competence support2006In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 45, no 8, 1094-1101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased interest in high precision radiation therapy is to a large extent driven by the potential of modern imaging technology. The aim of this project was to analyse how an expensive proton facility best could support a multi-centre health care system. We have developed a model for distributed expert collaboration where all clinical experts will work close to their patients in regional centres. Patients who are candidates for proton therapy will be examined and dose-planned at their regional clinic, discussed in a fully information supported video conference and digitally made available at the proton treatment facility. The proton facility itself will be placed near a communication centre easily reached by all patients where they will be treated under full responsibility of their own physician at the home clinic. This concept has been analysed in detail both with respect to the overall functionality and with respect to possible weaknesses. It was found that the concept of distributed radiation therapy, as proposed here, will offer a stable clinical solution for advanced radiation therapy. It will support the spread of knowledge, serve as a fully developed backup system and the concept will further serve as an efficient base for clinical research.

  • 41. Kemetli, Levent
    et al.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Temporal trends in the use of adjuvant systemic therapy in breast cancer: a population based study in Sweden 1976-2005.2009In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 48, no 1, 59-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both adjuvant therapy and mammography screening can decrease breast cancer mortality and there is a need of knowing to what extent those two modalities are used in the population. Screening coverage is well documented but there is a scarcity of population-based data on use of systemic adjuvant treatment.

    AIM: To describe the introduction, and trends in the use of adjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer in two of six public health regions in Sweden.

    MATERIAL & METHODS: Population-based data on use of adjuvant therapy were available from databases with documented high quality and high coverage data for Stockholm (1976-2005) and North Sweden (1980-2003, and 2005).

    RESULTS: The use of systemic treatment was infrequent before the late 1980s in both regions, but increased during the 1990s. In 2005, the proportion of operable breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy in the ages 40-59 was around 60 to 80%. The proportion adjuvant chemotherapy was less than 15% for the ages 70-74. For the north region the use of endocrine therapy increased successively over time, with an exception for age group 40-49 were a more rapidly increase occurred in the late 1990s. In Stockholm the increment was higher and more rapidly. There was no clear difference in chemotherapy use between the regions, and the use increased from the mid 1980s in age group 40-49, and in the early 1990s for women aged 50-59. In age group's 60-69 and 70-74 the use was relatively infrequent.

    CONCLUSIONS: Trends in, and levels of the use of adjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer varied over time in the two study regions, particularly for endocrine therapy. We consider that the differences between the regions mainly reflect different interpretations of new scientific evidence. We stress the importance of a good documentation of all new treatment protocols.

  • 42.
    Kersten, Christian
    et al.
    Southern Hospital Trust, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Louhimo, Johanna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ålgars, Annika
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Lahdesmaki, Aleksi
    Pkorvoo Hospital, Porvoo, Finland.
    Cvancerova, Milada
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Stenstedt, Kristina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Haglund, Caj
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Gunnarsson, Ulf
    Department for Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Increased C-reactive protein implies a poorer stage-specific prognosis in colon cancer2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 8, 1691-1698 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To characterize the stage-specific prognostic relevance of preoperative systemic inflammatory response, defined by C-reactive protein (CRP), in colon cancer (CC) patients.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from CC patients operated on from 1998 to 2007 at three hospitals from three different Nordic countries were collected retrospectively from national registries, local databases and/or patient records. Patients with emergency surgery, infection or auto-immune disease were excluded. Associations between clinical or histopathological variables and CRP were assessed. Patients were followed from the date of surgery to death or end of follow-up. Disease-specific survival (DSS) was the main endpoint.

    RESULTS: In total, 525 patients with age and stage distributions which were representative for CC patients were included. None of the patients was lost to follow-up. Age, TNM Stage, WHO differentiation grade and right-sided tumor location significantly associated with elevated CRP values, in contrast to postoperative morbidity, which did not. CRP levels were found to be a strong prognostic factor for DSS in CC. The risk of death due to CC was augmented with increasing levels of CRP in every stage of operated CC. Both short- and long-term DSS were impaired. The sub-hazard ratios for CRP-levels above 60 mg/L were 7.37 (CI 2.65-20.5) for stage I+ II, compared to 3.29 (CI 1.30-8.29) for stage III and 2.24 (CI 1.16-4.35) for stage IV.

    CONCLUSION: Increase of CRP concentrations correlate with clinically relevant poorer disease-specific survival in each stage of CC.

  • 43. Kristensen, Ingrid
    et al.
    Agrup, Mans
    Bergström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Engellau, Jacob
    Haugen, Hedda
    Martinsson, Ulla
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Taheri-Kadkhoda, Zahra
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Assessment of volume segmentation in radiotherapy of adolescents: a treatment planning study by the Swedish Workgroup for Paediatric Radiotherapy2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 1, 126-133 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose. The variability in target delineation for similar cases between centres treating paediatric and adolescent patients, and the apparent differences in interpretation of radiotherapy guidelines in the treatment protocols encouraged us to perform a dummy-run study as a part of our quality assurance work. The aim was to identify and quantify differences in the segmentation of target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) and to analyse the treatment plans and dose distributions. Materials and methods. Four patient cases were selected: Wilm's tumour, Hodgkin's disease, rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate and chordoma of the skull base. The five participating centres received the same patient-related material. They introduced the cases in their treatment planning system, delineated target volumes and OARs and created treatment plans. Dose-volume histograms were retrieved for relevant structures and volumes and dose metrics were derived and compared, e. g. target volumes and their concordance, dose homogeneity index (HI), treated and irradiated volumes, remaining volume at risk and relevant V x and D x values. Results. We found significant differences in target segmentation in the majority of the cases. The planning target volumes (PTVs) varied two-to four-fold and conformity indices were in the range of 0.3-0.6. This resulted in large variations in dose distributions to OARs as well as in treated and irradiated volumes even though the treatment plans showed good conformity to the PTVs. Potential reasons for the differences in target delineation were analysed. Conclusion. Considerations of the growing child and difficulties in interpretation of the radiotherapy information in the treatment protocols were identified as reasons for the variation. As a result, clarified translated detailed radiotherapy guidelines for paediatric/adolescent patients have been recognised as a way to reduce this variation.

  • 44.
    Kvarnbrink, Samuel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Karlsson, Terese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Edlund, Karolina
    Botling, Johan
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Jirström, Karin
    Micke, Patrick
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    LRIG1 is a prognostic biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer2015In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 54, no 8, 1113-1119 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) family of transmembrane proteins are involved in the regulation of cellular signal transduction. LRIG1 is an endogenous inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and an emerging tumor suppressor. In the lung epithelium, the expression of LRIG1 is downregulated by tobacco smoking, and further downregulated in lung squamous cell carcinoma. Material and methods: The expression of LRIG proteins were analyzed in 347 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by immunohistochemistry, and LRIG1 mRNA expression was evaluated in 807 lung cancer samples in silico in the Oncomine database. Potential associations between the expression data and the clinical parameters, including patient survival, were investigated. Results: Expression of the LRIG1 protein was found to be an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC, whereas expression of LRIG2 or LRIG3 did not correlate with patient survival. The levels of LRIG1 mRNA also correlated with the survival of NSCLC patients. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that LRIG1 is an independent prognostic factor in patients with NSCLC that could be important in future decision-making algorithms for adjuvant lung cancer treatment.

  • 45.
    Larsson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Johansson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Rossi Norrlund, Rauni
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Riklund Åhlström, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Methods for estimating uptake and absorbed dose in tumours from I-125 labelled monoclonal antibodies, based on scintigraphic imaging of mice.1999In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 38, no 3, 361-365 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunotargeting are often tested in tumour bearing nude mice. In vivo determination of the uptake of the monoclonal antibody in the tumour requires quantitative scintigraphy, and this in turn requires an adequate method for subtraction of radiation from the normal tissue. For this reason, two different methods for background subtraction were evaluated, a contralateral background region of interest or an irregular one, surrounding the tumour. A pinhole collimator was used for the scintigraphy and the monoclonal antibodies were labelled with 125I. Furthermore, a method was developed for estimation of the mean absorbed dose in the tumour from these repeated quantitative scintigraphic measurements. This requires that the tumour mass can be accurately estimated in vivo. Finally, the results were compared with in vitro measurements of the uptake.

  • 46.
    Lindblom, Ulrika
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden ; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kirkenes Hospital, Kirkenes , Norway Correspondence: P. Nilsson, Department of Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gärskog, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Kjellén, Elisabeth
    Department of Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Laurell, Göran
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Levring Jäghagen, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wahlberg, Peter
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Department of Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Radiation-induced trismus in the ARTSCAN head and neck trial2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 5, 620-627 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trismus, a well-known sequelae after treatment of head and neck cancer, decreases a patient's oral function and quality of life. The main objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate the long-term prevalence of radiation-induced trismus in patients treated for head and neck cancer according to two different fractionation schedules; and 2) model a dose-response relationship for trismus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients were recruited from the Swedish ARTSCAN trial, a prospective randomised multicentre study comparing conventional and accelerated fractionation. A total of 124 patients agreed to a clinical ENT examination 21-127 months (median 66 months) after beginning radiation therapy. Trismus-related scores were assessed using the EORTC H&N35 Quality of Life questionnaire. The TheraBite(®) range of motion scale was used to measure maximal interincisal distance. The dose-response relationship for structures important for mastication and the temporomandibular joints was investigated by normal tissue complication probability modelling. RESULTS: No significant differences in patient-reported trismus or maximal interincisal distance were found between the two trial arms. Patient-reported moderate to high scores regarding trismus increased from 3% at the start of radiation therapy to 25% at the long-term follow-up. Maximal interincisal distance correlated significantly with patient-reported scores of trismus. The best dose-response fit to the endpoint data was found for the dose to the ipsilateral masseter. CONCLUSIONS: Trismus is a persistent complication after radiotherapy with 3D-conformal radiation therapy. We found no difference between the severity and prevalence of trismus between conventional and accelerated fractionation, but a significant correlation between the absorbed dose to the mastication structures and opening of the mouth. Further prospective studies may determine whether a reduced dose to structures important for mastication using intensity-modulated radiation therapy will reduce problems with trismus.

  • 47. Linden, Ola
    et al.
    Stenberg, Lars
    Kjellén, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Department of Oncology, Lund, Sweden.
    Regression of cervical spinal cord compression in a patient with chordoma following treatment with cetuximab and gefitinib2009In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 48, no 1, 158-159 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lindgren, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Sandström, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Jonsson, Yvonne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bergenheim, A. Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    VEGF and tPA co-expressed in malignant glioma1997In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 36, no 6, 615-618 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Lindquist, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kvarnbrink, Samuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    LRIG and cancer prognosis2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 9, 1135-1142 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Optimal treatment decisions for cancer patients require reliable prognostic and predictive information. However, this information is inadequate in many cases. Several recent studies suggest that the leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) genes, transcripts, and proteins have prognostic implications in various cancer types. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Relevant literature was identified on PubMed using the key words lrig1, lrig2, and lrig3. LRIG mRNA expression in cancer versus normal tissues was investigated using the Oncomine database. RESULTS: The three human LRIG genes, LRIG1, LRIG2, and LRIG3, encode single-pass transmembrane proteins. LRIG1 is a negative regulator of growth factor signaling that has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor in vitro and in vivo in mice. The functions of LRIG2 and LRIG3 are less well defined. LRIG gene and protein expression are commonly dysregulated in human cancer. In early stage breast cancer, LRIG1 copy number was recently shown to predict early and late relapse in addition to overall survival; in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, loss of LRIG1 is also associated with poor survival. LRIG gene and protein expression have prognostic value in breast cancer, uterine cervical cancer, head-and-neck cancer, glioma, non-small cell lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. In general, expression of LRIG1 and LRIG3 is associated with good survival, whereas expression of LRIG2 is associated with poor survival. Additionally, LRIG1 regulates cellular sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs, which indicates a possible role as a predictive marker. CONCLUSIONS: LRIG gene statuses and mRNA and protein expression are clinically relevant prognostic indicators in several types of human cancer. We propose that LRIG analyses could become important when making informed and individualized clinical decisions regarding the management of cancer patients.

  • 50. Lissbrant, Ingela Franck
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Population-based study on use of chemotherapy in men with castration resistant prostate cancer2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 8, 1593-1601 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Chemotherapy prolongs life and relieves symptoms in men with castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is limited information on a population level on the use of chemotherapy for CRPC. Material and methods. To assess the use of chemotherapy in men with CRPC we conducted a register-based nationwide population-based study in Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) and a nationwide in-patient drug register (SALT database) between May 2009 and December 2010. We assumed that men who died of prostate cancer (PCa) underwent a period of CRPC before they died. Results. Among the 2677 men who died from PCa during the study inclusion period, 556 (21%) had received chemotherapy (intravenous or per oral) detectable within the observation period in SALT database. Specifically, 239 (61%) of men <70 years had received chemotherapy, 246 (30%) of men between 70 and 79 years and 71 (5%) men older than 80 years. The majority of men 465/556 (84%) had received a docetaxel-containing regimen. Among chemotherapy treated men, 283/556 (51%) received their last dose of chemotherapy during the last six months prior to death. Treatment with chemotherapy was more common among men with little comorbidity and high educational level, as well as in men who had received curatively intended primary treatment. Conclusion. A majority of men younger than 70 years with CRPC were treated with chemotherapy in contrast to men between 70 and 79 years of whom half as many received chemotherapy. Chemotherapy treatment was often administered shortly prior to death. The low uptake of chemotherapy in older men with CRPC may be caused by concerns about tolerability of treatment, as well as treatment decisions based on chronological age rather than global health status.

12 1 - 50 of 94
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf