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  • 1. Agudo, Antonio
    et al.
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sala, Núria
    Muñoz, Xavier
    Aranda, Núria
    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Vineis, Paolo
    Panico, Salvatore
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Grioni, Sara
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Molina, Esther
    Navarro, Carmen
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Chamosa, Saioa
    Allen, Naomi E
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Siersema, Peter D
    Numans, Mattijs E
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Kaaks, Rudof
    Canzian, Federico
    Boeing, Heiner
    Meidtner, Karina
    Johansson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine. WHO, IARC, Lyon, France.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Lund, Eiliv
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Jenab, Mazda
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Offerhaus, G Johan A
    Riboli, Elio
    González, Carlos A
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Hemochromatosis (HFE) gene mutations and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2013In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1244-1250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a strong risk factor for hepatocellular cancer, and mutations in the HFE gene associated with HH and iron overload may be related to other tumors, but no studies have been reported for gastric cancer (GC). A nested case-control study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), including 365 incident gastric adenocarcinoma and 1284 controls matched by center, sex, age and date of blood collection. Genotype analysis was performed for two functional polymorphisms (C282Y/rs1800562 and H63D/rs1799945) and seven tagSNPs of the HFE genomic region. Association with all gastric adenocarcinoma, and according to anatomical localization and histological subtype, was assessed by means of the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for the matching variables. We observed a significant association for H63D with OR (per rare allele) of 1.32 (CI = 1.03-1.69). In subgroup analyses, the association was stronger for non-cardia anatomical subsite (OR = 1.60, CI = 1.16-2.21) and intestinal histological subtype (OR = 1.82, CI = 1.27-2.62). Among intestinal cases, two tagSNPs (rs1572982 and rs6918586) also showed a significant association that disappeared after adjustment for H63D. No association with tumors located in the cardia or with diffuse subtype was found for any of the nine SNPs analyzed. Our results suggest that H63D variant in HFE gene seems to be associated with GC risk of the non-cardia region and intestinal type, possibly due to its association with iron overload although a role for other mechanisms cannot be entirely ruled out.

  • 2. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Jansen, Eugene
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel JB
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Riboli, Elio
    Romaguera, Dora
    Westphal, Sabine
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Saieva, Calogero
    Vineis, Paolo
    Tumino, Rosario
    Peeters, Petra H
    Argüelles, Marcial
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sánchez, María-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Huerta, Jose-María
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Allen, Naomi E
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Pischon, Tobias
    Total and high-molecular-weight adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study2012In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 1211-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adiponectin - an adipose-tissue-derived protein may provide a molecular link between obesity and colorectal cancer (CRC), but evidence from large prospective studies is limited. In particular, no epidemiological study explored high-molecular-weight (HMW) and non-HMW adiponectin fractions in relation to CRC risk, despite they were hypothesised to have differential biological activities, i.e. regulating insulin sensitivity (HMW-adiponectin) versus inflammatory response (non-HMW-adiponectin). In a prospective nested case-control study we investigated whether pre-diagnostic serum concentrations of total, HMW and non-HMW-adiponectin are associated with risk of CRC, independent of obesity and other known CRC risk factors. A total of 1206 incident cases (755 colon, 451 rectal) were matched to 1206 controls using incidence density sampling. In conditional logistic regression, adjusted for dietary and lifestyle factors, total adiponectin and non-HMW-adiponectin concentrations were inversely associated with risk of CRC [relative risk (RR) comparing highest versus lowest quintile = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.53-0.95, P (trend)=0.03 for total adiponectin and 0.45, 95%CI=0.34-0.61, P (trend)<0.0001 for non-HMW-adiponectin]. HMW-adiponectin concentrations were not associated with CRC risk (RR=0.91, 95%CI=0.68-1.22, P (trend)=0.55). Non-HMW-adiponectin was associated with CRC risk even after adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference (RR=0.39, 95%CI=0.26-0.60, P (trend)<0.0001); whereas the association with total adiponectin was no longer significant (RR=0.81, 95%CI=0.60-1.09, P (trend)=0.23). When stratified by cancer site, non-HMW-adiponectin was inversely associated with both colon and rectal cancer. These findings suggest an important role of the relative proportion of non-HMW-adiponectin in CRC pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to confirm these results and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  • 3. Alexandrie, A K
    et al.
    Warholm, M
    Carstensen, Ulrica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Axmon, A
    Hagmar, L
    Levin, Jan-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ostman, C
    Rannug, A
    CYP1A1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms affect urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels after PAH exposure2000In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 669-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Certain human biotransformation enzymes have been implicated in the formation and scavenging of the ultimate reactive metabolites, the diolepoxides, from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the present study, performed on aluminum smelter workers, we have analyzed airborne PAH, the pyrene metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) in urine, and genotypes for biotransformation enzymes involved in PAH metabolism. The aim was to evaluate the correlation between external exposure and biomarkers of exposure and to investigate to what extent genetic polymorphism in metabolic enzymes can explain interindividual variation in urinary 1-OHP levels. DNA was prepared from blood samples from 98 potroom workers and 55 controls and altogether eight polymorphisms in the CYP1A1, mEH, GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 genes were analyzed. The 1-OHP excretion was found to correlate significantly (P </= 0.005) to the exposure. The interindividual difference in excretion of 1-OHP was vast (>100-fold) and univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to find the variables that could determine differences in excretion. The variation could, to some degree, be explained by differences in exposure to airborne particulate-associated PAHs, the use of personal respiratory protection devices, smoking habits and genetic polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 1A1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 enzymes. The part of the variance that could be explained by differences in biotransformation genotypes seemed to be of the same order of magnitude as the variance explained by differences in exposure. In the control group as well as in the occupationally exposed group, the highest 1-OHP levels were observed in individuals carrying the CYP1A1 Ile/Val genotype who were also of the GSTM1 null genotype. The results show that urinary 1-OHP is a sensitive indicator of recent human exposure to PAHs and that it may also to some extent reflect the interindividual variation in susceptibility to PAHs.

  • 4. Brenner, Darren R
    et al.
    Amos, Christopher I
    Brhane, Yonathan
    Timofeeva, Maria N
    Caporaso, Neil
    Wang, Yufei
    Christiani, David C
    Bickeböller, Heike
    Yang, Ping
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Stevens, Victoria L
    Gapstur, Susan
    McKay, James
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Zaridze, David
    Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Rudnai, Peter
    Fabianova, Eleonora
    Mates, Dana
    Bencko, Vladimir
    Foretova, Lenka
    Janout, Vladimir
    Krokan, Hans E
    Skorpen, Frank
    Gabrielsen, Maiken E
    Vatten, Lars
    Njølstad, Inger
    Chen, Chu
    Goodman, Gary
    Lathrop, Mark
    Vooder, Tõnu
    Välk, Kristjan
    Nelis, Mari
    Metspalu, Andres
    Broderick, Peter
    Eisen, Timothy
    Wu, Xifeng
    Zhang, Di
    Chen, Wei
    Spitz, Margaret R
    Wei, Yongyue
    Su, Li
    Xie, Dong
    She, Jun
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Matsuda, Fumihiko
    Ito, Hidemi
    Risch, Angela
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Rosenberger, Albert
    Muley, Thomas
    Dienemann, Hendrik
    Field, John K
    Raji, Olaide
    Chen, Ying
    Gosney, John
    Liloglou, Triantafillos
    Davies, Michael P A
    Marcus, Michael
    McLaughlin, John
    Orlow, Irene
    Han, Younghun
    Li, Yafang
    Zong, Xuchen
    Johansson, Mattias
    Genetic Epidemiology Division, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Liu, Geoffrey
    Tworoger, Shelley S
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Henderson, Brian E
    Wilkens, Lynne R
    Dai, Juncheng
    Shen, Hongbing
    Houlston, Richard S
    Landi, Maria T
    Brennan, Paul
    Hung, Rayjean J
    Identification of lung cancer histology-specific variants applying Bayesian framework variant prioritization approaches within the TRICL and ILCCO consortia2015In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1314-1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have likely uncovered all common variants at the GWAS significance level. Additional variants within the suggestive range (0.0001> P > 5×10−8) are, however, still of interest for identifying causal associations. This analysis aimed to apply novel variant prioritization approaches to identify additional lung cancer variants that may not reach the GWAS level. Effects were combined across studies with a total of 33456 controls and 6756 adenocarcinoma (AC; 13 studies), 5061 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 12 studies) and 2216 small cell lung cancer cases (9 studies). Based on prior information such as variant physical properties and functional significance, we applied stratified false discovery rates, hierarchical modeling and Bayesian false discovery probabilities for variant prioritization. We conducted a fine mapping analysis as validation of our methods by examining top-ranking novel variants in six independent populations with a total of 3128 cases and 2966 controls. Three novel loci in the suggestive range were identified based on our Bayesian framework analyses: KCNIP4 at 4p15.2 (rs6448050, P = 4.6×10−7) and MTMR2 at 11q21 (rs10501831, P = 3.1×10−6) with SCC, as well as GAREM at 18q12.1 (rs11662168, P = 3.4×10−7) with AC. Use of our prioritization methods validated two of the top three loci associated with SCC (P = 1.05×10−4 for KCNIP4, represented by rs9799795) and AC (P = 2.16×10−4 for GAREM, represented by rs3786309) in the independent fine mapping populations. This study highlights the utility of using prior functional data for sequence variants in prioritization analyses to search for robust signals in the suggestive range.

  • 5. Chien, Ming-Hsien
    et al.
    Ku, Chia-Chi
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University.
    Chen, Min-Wei
    Hsiao, Michael
    Su, Jen-Liang
    Inoue, Hiroyasu
    Hua, Kuo-Tai
    Wei, Lin-Hung
    Kuo, Min-Liang
    Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) promotes angiogenesis by induction of COX-2 in leukemic cells via the VEGF-R3/JNK/AP-1 pathway.2009In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 2005-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C is recognized as a tumor lymphangiogenic factor based on the effects of activated VEGF-R3 on lymphatic endothelial cells. Many tumor cells express VEGF-R3 but the function of this receptor in tumor cells is largely unknown. It has been reported that the VEGF-C/VEGF-R3 axis is activated in subsets of leukemia patients. Herein, we have shown that VEGF-C induces angiogenic activity in the tube formation assay invitro and Matrigel plug assay in vivo by upregulating an angiogenic factor, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), through VEGF-R3 in the human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line, THP-1. COX-2 induction by VEGF-C was also observed in other VEGF-R3(+) human AML cell lines (U937 and HL60). Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of bone marrow specimens of 37 patients diagnosed with AML revealed that VEGF-C expression in specimens was associated with the expression of COX-2 (P < 0.001). The manner by which signaling pathways transduced by VEGF-C is responsible for COX-2 upregulation was further investigated. Blocking the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway with the MAPK kinase inhibitor, PD 98059, failed to inhibit VEGF-C-mediated COX-2 expression. However, VEGF-C-induced COX-2 upregulation was effectively abolished by overexpression of dominant-negative c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or treatment with the JNK inhibitor, SP 600125. VEGF-C induced JNK-dependent nuclear translocation of c-Jun. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays revealed that VEGF-C enhanced c-Jun binding to the cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-response element of the COX-2 promoter and induced COX-2 expression. In sum, the data herein highlight the pathogenic role of VEGF-C in leukemia via regulation of angiogenesis through upregulation of COX-2.

  • 6. Cui, Tao
    et al.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Ameur, Adam
    Gustavsson, Inger
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Invasive cervical tumors with high and low HPV titer represent molecular subgroups with different disease etiology2019In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 269-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Invasive cervical cancer (ICC) with very low titer of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) has worse clinical outcome than cases with high titer, indicating a difference in molecular etiology. Fresh-frozen ICC tumors (n=49) were classified into high and low HPV titer cases using real-time PCR-based HPV genotyping. The mutation spectra were studied using the AmpliSeq Comprehensive Cancer Panel and the expression profiles using total RNA-sequencing, and the results validated using the AmpliSeq Transcriptome assay. HPV DNA genotyping and RNA sequencing showed that 16.6% of ICC tumors contained very low levels of HPV DNA and HPV transcripts. Tumors with low HPV levels had more mutations with a high allele frequency and fewer mutations with low allele frequency relative to tumors with high HPV titer. A number of genes showed significant expression differences between HPV titer groups, including genes with somatic mutations. Gene ontology and pathway analyses implicated the enrichment of genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle control and extracellular matrix in tumors with low HPV titer. The results indicate that in low titer tumors, HPV act as trigger of cancer development while somatic mutations are clonally selected and become drivers of the tumor development process. In contrast, in tumors with high HPV titer the expression of HPV oncoproteins play a major role in tumor development and the many low frequency somatic mutations represent passengers. This putative subdivision of invasive cervical tumors may explain the higher radiosensitivity of ICC tumors with high HPV titer and thereby have consequences for clinical management.

  • 7. Dai, Juncheng
    et al.
    Li, Zhihua
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Hung, Rayjean J.
    Tardon, Adonina
    Andrew, Angeline S.
    Chen, Chu
    Christiani, David C.
    Albanes, Demetrios
    van der Heijden, Erik H. F. M.
    Duell, Eric J.
    Rennert, Gad
    Mckay, James D.
    Yuan, Jian-Min
    Field, John K.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Teare, M. Dawn
    Schabath, Matthew B.
    Aldrich, Melinda C.
    Tsao, Ming-Sound
    Lazarus, Philip
    Lam, Stephen
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Arnold, Susanne
    Wu, Xifeng
    Haugen, Aage
    Janout, Vladimir
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Brhane, Yonathan
    Fernandez-Somoano, Ana
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Davies, Michael P. A.
    Zienolddiny, Shanbeh
    Hu, Zhibin
    Shen, Hongbing
    Systematic analyses of regulatory variants in DNase I hypersensitive sites identified two novel lung cancer susceptibility loci2019In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 432-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS) are abundant in regulatory elements, such as promoter, enhancer and transcription factor binding sites. Many studies have revealed that disease-associated variants were concentrated in DHS-related regions. However, limited studies are available on the roles of DHS-related variants in lung cancer. In this study, we performed a large-scale case-control study with 20 871 lung cancer cases and 15 971 controls to evaluate the associations between regulatory genetic variants in DHS and lung cancer susceptibility. The expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis and pathway-enrichment analysis were performed to identify the possible target genes and pathways. In addition, we performed motif-based analysis to explore the lung-cancer-related motifs using sequence kernel association test. Two novel variants, rs186332 in 20q13.3 (C>T, odds ratio [OR] = 1.17, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.10-1.24, P = 8.45 x 10(-7)) and rs4839323 in 1p13.2 (T>C, OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.89-0.95, P = 1.02 x 10(-6)) showed significant association with lung cancer risk. The eQTL analysis suggested that these two SNPs might regulate the expression of MRGBP and SLC16A1, respectively. What's more, the expression of both MRGBP and SLC16A1 was aberrantly elevated in lung tumor tissues. The motif-based analysis identified 10 motifs related to the risk of lung cancer (P < 1.71 x 10(-4)). Our findings suggested that variants in DHS might modify lung cancer susceptibility through regulating the expression of surrounding genes. This study provided us a deeper insight into the roles of DHS-related genetic variants for lung cancer.

  • 8. Dossus, Laure
    et al.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Canzian, Federico
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buring, Julie
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Feigelson, Heather Spencer
    Gaziano, John M
    Giovannucci, Edward
    Gonzalez, Carlos
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hankinson, Susan E
    Hayes, Richard B
    Henderson, Brian E
    Hoover, Robert N
    Hunter, David J
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kolonel, Laurence N
    Kraft, Peter
    Ma, Jing
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Lund, Eiliv
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Stampfer, Meir
    Stram, Dan O
    Thomas, Gilles
    Thun, Michael J
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Tumino, Rosario
    Riboli, Elio
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Weinstein, Stephanie J
    Yeager, Meredith
    Ziegler, Regina G
    Cox, David G
    PTGS2 and IL6 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer: results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)2010In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 455-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostate cancers. We conducted a study within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium to examine the association between IL6 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and breast and prostate cancer risk. Twenty-seven polymorphisms, selected by pairwise tagging, were genotyped on 6292 breast cancer cases and 8135 matched controls and 8008 prostate cancer cases and 8604 matched controls. The large sample sizes and comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism tagging in this study gave us excellent power to detect modest effects for common variants. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of the associations examined remained statistically significant at P = 0.01. In analyses not adjusted for multiple testing, one IL6 polymorphism (rs6949149) was marginally associated with breast cancer risk (TT versus GG, odds ratios (OR): 1.32; 99% confidence intervals (CI): 1.00-1.74, P(trend) = 0.003) and two were marginally associated with prostate cancer risk (rs6969502-AA versus rs6969502-GG, OR: 0.87, 99% CI: 0.75-1.02; P(trend) = 0.002 and rs7805828-AA versus rs7805828-GG, OR: 1.11, 99% CI: 0.99-1.26; P(trend) = 0.007). An increase in breast cancer risk was observed for the PTGS2 polymorphism rs7550380 (TT versus GG, OR: 1.38, 99% CI: 1.04-1.83). No association was observed between PTGS2 polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk. In conclusion, common genetic variation in these two genes might play at best a limited role in breast and prostate cancers.

  • 9. Duell, Eric J.
    et al.
    Sala, Nuria
    Travier, Noemie
    Munoz, Xavier
    Christine Boutron-Ruault, Marie
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Navarro, Carmen
    Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Vineis, Paolo
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Allen, Naomi E.
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Numans, Mattijs E.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.
    van Oijen, M. G. H.
    Bamia, Christina
    Benetou, Vassiliki
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Canzian, Federico
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bergmann, Manuela M.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Ehrnstrom, Roy
    Johansen, Dorthe
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Ostergaard, Jane Nautrup
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Jenab, Mazda
    Nesi, Gabriella
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Genetic variation in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1A, ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH7) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort2012In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 361-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies that have examined the association between alcohol consumption and gastric cancer (GC) risk have been inconsistent. We conducted an investigation of 29 genetic variants in alcohol metabolism loci (alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH1 gene cluster: ADH1A, ADH1B and ADH1C; ADH7 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, ALDH2), alcohol intake and GC risk. We analyzed data from a nested case-control study (364 cases and 1272 controls) within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using a customized array. We observed a statistically significant association between a common 3'-flanking SNP near ADH1A (rs1230025) and GC risk [allelic odds ratio (OR)(A v T) = 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-1.59]. Two intronic variants, one in ADH1C (rs283411) and one in ALDH2 (rs16941667), also were associated with GC risk (ORT v C = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.38-0.91 and ORT v C = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.00-1.79, respectively). Individuals carrying variant alleles at both ADH1 (rs1230025) and ALDH2 (rs16941667) were twice as likely to develop GC (ORA+T = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.25-3.20) as those not carrying variant alleles. The association between rs1230025 and GC was modified by alcohol intake (< 5 g/day: ORA = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.57-1.39; >= 5 g/day: ORA = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.08-1.94, P-value = 0.05). The association was also modified by ethanol intake from beer. A known functional SNP in ADH1B (rs1229984) was associated with alcohol intake (P-value = 0.04) but not GC risk. Variants in ADH7 were not associated with alcohol intake or GC risk. In conclusion, genetic variants at ADH1 and ALDH2 loci may influence GC risk, and alcohol intake may further modify the effect of ADH1 rs1230025. Additional population-based studies are needed to confirm our results.

  • 10. Figueroa, Jonine D.
    et al.
    Han, Summer S.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    Baris, Dalsu
    Jacobs, Eric J.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Schwenn, Molly
    Malats, Nuria
    Johnson, Alison
    Purdue, Mark P.
    Caporaso, Neil
    Landi, Maria Teresa
    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Hutchinson, Amy
    Burdette, Laurie
    Wheeler, William
    Vineis, Paolo
    Siddiq, Afshan
    Cortessis, Victoria K.
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Cussenot, Olivier
    Benhamou, Simone
    Prescott, Jennifer
    Porru, Stefano
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Travis, Ruth
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Brenan, Paul
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Riboli, Elio
    Conti, David
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Stern, Mariana C.
    Pike, Malcolm C.
    Van den Berg, David
    Yuan, Jian-Min
    Hohensee, Chancellor
    Rodabough, Rebecca
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Roupret, Morgan
    Comperat, Eva
    Chen, Constance
    De Vivo, Immaculata
    Giovannucci, Edward
    Hunter, David J.
    Kraft, Peter
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Carta, Angela
    Pavanello, Sofia
    Arici, Cecilia
    Mastrangelo, Giuseppe
    Karagas, Margaret R.
    Schned, Alan
    Armenti, Karla R.
    Hosain, G. M. Monawar
    Haiman, Chris A.
    Fraumeni, Joseph F., Jr.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Chatterjee, Nilanjan
    Rothman, Nathaniel
    Silverman, Debra T.
    Genome-wide interaction study of smoking and bladder cancer risk2014In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1737-1744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bladder cancer is a complex disease with known environmental and genetic risk factors. We performed a genome-wide interaction study (GWAS) of smoking and bladder cancer risk based on primary scan data from 3002 cases and 4411 controls from the National Cancer Institute Bladder Cancer GWAS. Alternative methods were used to evaluate both additive and multiplicative interactions between individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and smoking exposure. SNPs with interaction P values < 5 x 10(-5) were evaluated further in an independent dataset of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls. We identified 10 SNPs that showed association in a consistent manner with the initial dataset and in the combined dataset, providing evidence of interaction with tobacco use. Further, two of these novel SNPs showed strong evidence of association with bladder cancer in tobacco use subgroups that approached genome-wide significance. Specifically, rs1711973 (FOXF2) on 6p25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for never smokers [combined odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.20-1.50, P value = 5.18 x 10(-7)]; and rs12216499 (RSPH3-TAGAP-EZR) on 6q25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for ever smokers (combined OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.67-0.84, P value = 6.35 x 10-7). In our analysis of smoking and bladder cancer, the tests for multiplicative interaction seemed to more commonly identify susceptibility loci with associations in never smokers, whereas the additive interaction analysis identified more loci with associations among smokers-including the known smoking and NAT2 acetylation interaction. Our findings provide additional evidence of gene-environment interactions for tobacco and bladder cancer.

  • 11.
    Hoeft, Birgit
    et al.
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Linseisen, Jakob
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Beckmann, Lars
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Müller-Decker, Karin
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Canzian, Federico
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hüsing, Anika
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Vogel, Ulla
    National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Soborg, Denmark.
    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Overvad, Kim
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Hansen, Rikke Dalgaard
    Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Knüppel, Sven
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece .
    Yvoni, Koumantaki
    Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA .
    Berrino, Franco
    Etiological Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy .
    Palli, Domenico
    Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute – ISPO, Florence, Italy .
    Panico, Salvatore
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Naples, Italy .
    Tumino, Rosario
    Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, Department of Oncology , “Civile - M.P.Arezzo” Hospital, Ragusa, Italy .
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands .
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands .
    van Gils, Carla H
    Julius Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands .
    Peeters, Petra H
    Julius Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands .
    Dumeaux, Vanessa
    Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway .
    Lund, Eiliv
    Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway .
    Huerta Castaño, José M
    CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, CIBERESP, Spain .
    Muñoz, Xavier
    Research Laboratory and Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, IDIBELL-Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain .
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Public Health and Participation Directorate, Health and Health Care Services Council, Asturias, Spain .
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, CIBERESP, Spain .
    Manjer, Jonas
    Department of Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden .
    Jirström, Karin
    Center for Molecular Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö Sweden .
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Spencer, Elizabeth A
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK .
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK .
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge .
    Wareham, Nick
    Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK .
    Morois, Sophie
    Inserm, (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), and Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France .
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Inserm, (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), and Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France .
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Inserm, (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), and Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France .
    Chajes, Veronique
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France .
    Jenab, Mazda
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France .
    Boffetta, Paolo
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France .
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cancer Epidemiology Department, University of Turin, Turin, Italy .
    Mouw, Traci
    Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London, London, UK .
    Norat, Teresa
    Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London, London, UK .
    Riboli, Elio
    Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London, London, UK .
    Nieters, Alexandra
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Polymorphisms in fatty acid metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk.2010In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth-leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. 392 single nucleotide polymorphisms were selected using pairwise tagging with an r(2) cutoff of 0.8 and a minor allele frequency of >5%. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Haplotype analysis was performed using a generalized linear model framework. On the genotype level, HPGD, PLA2G6, and TRPV3 were associated with higher risk for colorectal cancer, while PTGER2 was associated with lower colorectal cancer risk. A significant inverse association (p < 0.006) was found for PTGER2 GGG haplotype while HPGD AGGAG and PLA2G3 CT haplotypes were significantly (p < 0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively) associated with higher risk of colorectal cancer. Based on these data we present for the first time the association of HPGD variants with colorectal cancer risk. Our results support the key role of prostanoid signaling in colon carcinogenesis and suggest a relevance of genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal cancer risk.

  • 12. Iglesias-Gato, Diego
    et al.
    Chuan, Yin-Choy
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Augsten, Sandra
    Jiang, Ning
    Niu, Yuanjie
    Seipel, Amanda
    Danneman, Daniela
    Vermeij, Marcel
    Fernandez-Perez, Leandro
    Jenster, Guido
    Egevad, Lars
    Norstedt, Gunnar
    Flores-Morales, Amilcar
    SOCS2 mediates the cross talk between androgen and growth hormone signaling in prostate cancer2014In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 24-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anabolic signals such as androgens and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis play an essential role in the normal development of the prostate but also in its malignant transformation. In this study, we investigated the role of suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) as mediator of the cross talk between androgens and GH signals in the prostate and its potential role as tumor suppressor in prostate cancer (PCa). We observed that SOCS2 protein levels assayed by immunohistochemistry are elevated in hormone therapy-naive localized prostatic adenocarcinoma in comparison with benign tissue. In contrast, however, castration-resistant bone metastases exhibit reduced levels of SOCS2 in comparison with localized or hormone naive, untreated metastatic tumors. In PCa cells, SOCS2 expression is induced by androgens through a mechanism that requires signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 protein (STAT5) and androgen receptor-dependent transcription. Consequentially, SOCS2 inhibits GH activation of Janus kinase 2, Src and STAT5 as well as both cell invasion and cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, SOCS2 limits proliferation and production of IGF-1 in the prostate in response to GH. Our results suggest that the use of GH-signaling inhibitors could be of value as a complementary treatment for castration-resistant PCa. Summary: Androgen induced SOCS2 ubiquitin ligase expression and inhibited GH signaling as well as cell proliferation and invasion in PCa, whereas reduced SOCS2 was present in castration-resistant cases. GH-signaling inhibitors might be a complementary therapeutic option for advanced PCa.

  • 13. Kachuri, Linda
    et al.
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Mckay, James D.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Quiros, J. Ramon
    Sieri, Sabina
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Henderson, Brian E.
    Wilkens, Lynne
    Goodman, Gary E.
    Chen, Chu
    Doherty, Jennifer A.
    Christiani, David C.
    Wei, Yongyue
    Su, Li
    Tworoger, Shelley
    Zhang, Xuehong
    Kraft, Peter
    Zaridze, David
    Field, John K.
    Marcus, Michael W.
    Davies, Michael P. A.
    Hyde, Russell
    Caporaso, Neil E.
    Landi, Maria Teresa
    Severi, Gianluca
    Giles, Graham G.
    Liu, Geoffrey
    McLaughlin, John R.
    Li, Yafang
    Xiao, Xiangjun
    Fehringer, Gord
    Zong, Xuchen
    Denroche, Robert E.
    Zuzarte, Philip C.
    McPherson, John D.
    Brennan, Paul
    Hung, Rayjean J.
    Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci2016In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 96-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000x) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73x10(-9)), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = 2.64x10(-6)), rs112290073 (OR = 1.85, P = 1.27x10(-5)), rs138895564 (OR = 2.16, P = 2.06x10(-5); among young cases, OR = 3.77, P = 8.41x10(-4)). In addition, we found that rs139852726 (P = 1.44x10(-3)) was associated with telomere length in a sample of 922 healthy individuals. The gene-based SKAT-O analysis implicated TERT as the most relevant gene in the 5p15.33 region for adenocarcinoma (P = 7.84x10(-7)) and lung cancer (P = 2.37x10(-5)) risk. In this largest fine-mapping study to investigate a large number of rare and novel variants within 5p15.33, we identified novel lung and adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci with large effects and provided support for the role of telomere length as the potential underlying mechanism.

  • 14. Li, Donghui
    et al.
    Duell, Eric J.
    Yu, Kai
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Olson, Sara H.
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Wolpin, Brian M.
    Jiao, Li
    Dong, Xiaoqun
    Wheeler, Bill
    Arslan, Alan A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Fuchs, Charles S.
    Gallinger, Steven
    Gross, Myron
    Hartge, Patricia
    Hoover, Robert N.
    Holly, Elizabeth A.
    Jacobs, Eric J.
    Klein, Alison P.
    LaCroix, Andrea
    Mandelson, Margaret T.
    Petersen, Gloria
    Zheng, Wei
    Agalliu, Ilir
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Bracci, Paige M.
    Buring, Julie E.
    Canzian, Federico
    Chang, Kenneth
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Cotterchio, Michelle
    Gaziano, J. Michael
    Giovannucci, Edward L.
    Goggins, Michael
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hankinson, Susan E.
    Bolton, Judith A. Hoffman
    Hunter, David J.
    Hutchinson, Amy
    Jacobs, Kevin B.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kraft, Peter
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Kurtz, Robert C.
    McWilliams, Robert R.
    Mendelsohn, Julie B.
    Patel, Alpa V.
    Rabe, Kari G.
    Riboli, Elio
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Tobias, Geoffrey S.
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Visvanathan, Kala
    Watters, Joanne
    Yu, Herbert
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Amundadottir, Laufey
    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.
    Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer2012In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 1384-1390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P < 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 x 10(-6), 1.6 x 10(-5), 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 x 10(-5)), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P < 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H.pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer.

  • 15. Li, Yafang
    et al.
    Xiao, Xiangjun
    Han, Younghun
    Gorlova, Olga
    Qian, David
    Leighl, Natasha
    Johansen, Jakob S.
    Barnett, Matt
    Chen, Chu
    Goodman, Gary
    Cox, Angela
    Taylor, Fiona
    Woll, Penella
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Manz, Judith
    Muley, Thomas
    Risch, Angela
    Rosenberger, Albert
    Arnold, Susanne M.
    Haura, Eric B.
    Bolca, Ciprian
    Holcatova, Ivana
    Janout, Vladimir
    Kontic, Milica
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Mukeria, Anush
    Ognjanovic, Simona
    Orlowski, Tadeusz M.
    Scelo, Ghislaine
    Swiatkowska, Beata
    Zaridze, David
    Bakke, Per
    Skaug, Vidar
    Zienolddiny, Shanbeh
    Duell, Eric J.
    Butler, Lesley M.
    Houlston, Richard
    Artigas, María Soler
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Shepherd, Frances A.
    Marcus, Michael W.
    Brunnström, Hans
    Manjer, Jonas
    Melander, Olle
    Muller, David C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Liu, Geoffrey
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Wu, Xifeng
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Albanes, Demetrios
    Bickeböller, Heike
    Aldrich, Melinda C.
    Bush, William S.
    Tardon, Adonina
    Rennert, Gad
    Teare, M. Dawn
    Field, John K.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Lazarus, Philip
    Haugen, Aage
    Lam, Stephen
    Schabath, Matthew B
    Andrew, Angeline S.
    Bertazzi, Pier Alberto
    Pesatori, Angela C.
    Christiani, David C.
    Caporaso, Neil
    Johansson, Mattias
    McKay, James D.
    Brennan, Paul
    Hung, Rayjean J.
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Genome-wide interaction study of smoking behavior and non-small cell lung cancer risk in Caucasian population2018In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 336-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer. Both environmental and genetic risk factors contribute to lung carcinogenesis. We conducted a genome-wide interaction analysis between SNPs and smoking status (never vs ever smokers) in a European-descent population. We adopted a two-step analysis strategy in the discovery stage: we first conducted a case-only interaction analysis to assess the relationship between SNPs and smoking behavior using 13,336 NSCLC cases. Candidate SNPs with p-value less than 0.001 were further analyzed using a standard case-control interaction analysis including 13970 controls. The significant SNPs with p-value less than 3.5x10-5 (correcting for multiple tests) from the case-control analysis in the discovery stage were further validated using an independent replication dataset comprising 5377 controls and 3054 NSCLC cases. We further stratified the analysis by histological subtypes. Two novel SNPs, rs6441286 and rs17723637, were identified for overall lung cancer risk. The interaction odds ratio and meta-analysis p-value for these two SNPs were 1.24 with 6.96x10-7 and 1.37 with 3.49x10-7, respectively. Additionally, interaction of smoking with rs4751674 was identified in squamous cell lung carcinoma with an odds ratio of 0.58 and p-value of 8.12x10-7. This study is by far the largest genome-wide SNP-smoking interaction analysis reported for lung cancer. The three identified novel SNPs provide potential candidate biomarkers for lung cancer risk screening and intervention. The results from our study reinforce that gene-smoking interactions play important roles in the etiology of lung cancer and account for part of the missing heritability of this disease.

  • 16. Manuguerra, M
    et al.
    Matullo, G
    Veglia, F
    Autrup, H
    Dunning, A M
    Garte, S
    Gormally, E
    Malaveille, C
    Guarrera, S
    Polidoro, S
    Saletta, F
    Peluso, M
    Airoldi, L
    Overvad, K
    Raaschou-Nielsen, O
    Clavel-Chapelon, F
    Linseisen, J
    Boeing, H
    Trichopoulos, D
    Kalandidi, A
    Palli, D
    Krogh, V
    Tumino, R
    Panico, S
    Bueno-De-Mesquita, H B
    Peeters, P H
    Lund, E
    Pera, G
    Martinez, C
    Amiano, P
    Barricarte, A
    Tormo, M J
    Quiros, J R
    Berglund, G
    Janzon, L
    Jarvholm, B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Enviromental Medicine.
    Day, N E
    Allen, N E
    Saracci, R
    Kaaks, R
    Ferrari, P
    Riboli, E
    Vineis, P
    Multi-factor dimensionality reduction applied to a large prospective investigation on gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.2007In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 414-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly evident that single-locus effects cannot explain complex multifactorial human diseases like cancer. We applied the multi-factor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method to a large cohort study on gene-environment and gene-gene interactions. The study (case-control nested in the EPIC cohort) was established to investigate molecular changes and genetic susceptibility in relation to air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in non-smokers. We have analyzed 757 controls and 409 cases with bladder cancer (n=124), lung cancer (n=116) and myeloid leukemia (n=169). Thirty-six gene variants (DNA repair and metabolic genes) and three environmental exposure variables (measures of air pollution and ETS at home and at work) were analyzed. Interactions were assessed by prediction error percentage and cross-validation consistency (CVC) frequency. For lung cancer, the best model was given by a significant gene-environment association between the base excision repair (BER) XRCC1-Arg399Gln polymorphism, the double-strand break repair (DSBR) BRCA2-Asn372His polymorphism and the exposure variable 'distance from heavy traffic road', an indirect and robust indicator of air pollution (mean prediction error of 26%, P<0.001, mean CVC of 6.60, P=0.02). For bladder cancer, we found a significant 4-loci association between the BER APE1-Asp148Glu polymorphism, the DSBR RAD52-3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) polymorphism and the metabolic gene polymorphisms COMT-Val158Met and MTHFR-677C>T (mean prediction error of 22%, P<0.001, mean CVC consistency of 7.40, P<0.037). For leukemia, a 3-loci model including RAD52-2259C>T, MnSOD-Ala9Val and CYP1A1-Ile462Val had a minimum prediction error of 31% (P<0.001) and a maximum CVC of 4.40 (P=0.086). The MDR method seems promising, because it provides a limited number of statistically stable interactions; however, the biological interpretation remains to be understood.

  • 17. Nieters, Alexandra
    et al.
    Luczynska, Anna
    Becker, Susen
    Becker, Nikolaus
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Overvad, Kim
    Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    Boeing, Heiner
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Masala, Giovanna
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Jeurnink, Suzanne M.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Sanchez, Maraia-Jose
    Sanchez, Soledad
    Borgquist, Signe
    Butt, Salma
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Spaeth, Florentin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Brennan, Paul
    Kelly, Rachel S.
    Riboli, Elio
    Vineis, Paolo
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Prediagnostic immunoglobulin E levels and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, other lymphomas and multiple myeloma-results of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition2014In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 2716-2722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous epidemiological studies suggest an inverse association between allergies, marked by elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk. The evidence, however, is inconsistent and prospective data are sparse. We examined the association between prediagnostic total (low: < 20; intermediate: 20-100; high > 100 kU/l) and specific IgE (negative: < 0.35; positive >= 0.35 kU/I) concentrations against inhalant antigens and lymphoma risk in a study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 1021 incident cases and matched controls of NHL, multiple myeloma (MM) and Hodgkin lymphoma with a mean follow-up time of 7 years were investigated. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Specific IgE was not associated with the risk of MM, B-cell NHL and B-cell NHL subtypes. In contrast, total IgE levels were inversely associated with the risk of MM [high level: OR = 0.40 (95% CI = 0.21-0.79)] and B-cell NHL [intermediate level: OR = 0.68 (95% CI = 0.53-0.88); high level: OR = 0.62 (95% CI = 0.44-0.86)], largely on the basis of a strong inverse association with chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL; intermediate level: OR = 0.49 (95% CI = 0.30-0.80); high level: OR = 0.13 (95% CI = 0.05-0.35)] risk. The inverse relationship for CLL remained significant for those diagnosed 5 years after baseline. The findings of this large prospective study demonstrated significantly lower prediagnostic total IgE levels among CLL and MM cases compared with matched controls. This corresponds to the clinical immunodeficiency state often observed in CLL patients prior to diagnosis. No support for an inverse association between prediagnostic levels of specific IgE and NHL risk was found.

  • 18. Stepien, Magdalena
    et al.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Freisling, Heinz
    Becker, Niels-Peter
    Czuban, Magdalena
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Mancini, Francesca Romana
    Savoye, Isabelle
    Katzke, Verena
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Iqbal, Khalid
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. (as. )
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Merino, Susana
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Huerta, Jose Maria
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Bodén, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    van Guelpen, Behany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wareham, Nick
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Bradbury, Kathryn E.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Schomburg, Lutz
    Hughes, David J.
    Pre-diagnostic copper and zinc biomarkers and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort2017In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 699-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adequate intake of copper and zinc, two essential micronutrients, are important for antioxidant functions. Their imbalance may have implications for development of diseases like colorectal cancer (CRC), where oxidative stress is thought to be etiologically involved. As evidence from prospective epidemiologic studies is lacking, we conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to investigate the association between circulating levels of copper and zinc, and their calculated ratio, with risk of CRC development. Copper and zinc levels were measured by reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in 966 cases and 966 matched controls. Multivariable adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression and are presented for the fifth versus first quintile. Higher circulating concentration of copper was associated with a raised CRC risk (OR = 1.50; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.13; P-trend = 0.02) whereas an inverse association with cancer risk was observed for higher zinc levels (OR = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.97; P-trend = 0.07). Consequently, the ratio of copper/zinc was positively associated with CRC (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.40; P-trend = 0.0005). In subgroup analyses by follow-up time, the associations remained statistically significant only in those diagnosed within 2 years of blood collection. In conclusion, these data suggest that copper or copper levels in relation to zinc (copper to zinc ratio) become imbalanced in the process of CRC development. Mechanistic studies into the underlying mechanisms of regulation and action are required to further examine a possible role for higher copper and copper/ zinc ratio levels in CRC development and progression.

  • 19. Tang, Hongwei
    et al.
    Wei, Peng
    Duell, Eric J
    Risch, Harvey A
    Olson, Sara H
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Gallinger, Steven
    Holly, Elizabeth A
    Petersen, Gloria
    Bracci, Paige M
    McWilliams, Robert R
    Jenab, Mazda
    Riboli, Elio
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Kaaks, Rudolph
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Amos, Christopher I
    Li, Donghui
    Axonal guidance signaling pathway interacting with smoking in modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer: a gene- and pathway-based interaction analysis of GWAS data2014In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1039-1045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cigarette smoking is the best established modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that underlie smoking-related pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level. Taking advantage of the existing Genome-wide association study (GWAS) genotype and risk factor data from the Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium, we conducted a discovery study in 2028 cases and 2109 controls to examine gene-smoking interactions at pathway/gene/single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. Using the likelihood ratio test nested in logistic regression models and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we examined 172 KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways, 3 manually curated gene sets, 3 nicotine dependency gene ontology pathways, 17 912 genes and 468 114 SNPs. None of the individual pathway/gene/SNP showed significant interaction with smoking after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Six KEGG pathways showed nominal interactions (P < 0.05) with smoking, and the top two are the pancreatic secretion and salivary secretion pathways (major contributing genes: RAB8A, PLCB and CTRB1). Nine genes, i.e. ZBED2, EXO1, PSG2, SLC36A1, CLSTN1, MTHFSD, FAT2, IL10RB and ATXN2 had P interaction < 0.0005. Five intergenic region SNPs and two SNPs of the EVC and KCNIP4 genes had P interaction < 0.00003. In IPA analysis of genes with nominal interactions with smoking, axonal guidance signaling $$\left(P=2.12\times 1{0}^{-7}\right)$$ and α-adrenergic signaling $$\left(P=2.52\times 1{0}^{-5}\right)$$ genes were significantly overrepresented canonical pathways. Genes contributing to the axon guidance signaling pathway included the SLIT/ROBO signaling genes that were frequently altered in pancreatic cancer. These observations need to be confirmed in additional data set. Once confirmed, it will open a new avenue to unveiling the etiology of smoking-associated pancreatic cancer.

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