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  • 1.
    Einarsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Laurell, Göran
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tiblom Ehrsson, Ylva
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Experiences and coping strategies related to food and eating up to two years after the termination of treatment in patients with head and neck cancer2019In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 28, no 2, article id e12964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to describe how patients with head and neck cancer experience and cope with difficulties related to food and eating up to two years after the termination of treatment. One hundred and thirty‐five patients were followed with thematically structured interviews. The patients’ responses of nutritional issues were categorised using similarities and differences technique. In the analysis, six categories emerged describing the process of eating and drinking from the end of treatment up to two years after treatment: The constant battle - eating and drinking over time, Food alterations and nutritional support - both pros and cons, Standing aside and not joining in when eating together with others, Finding ways to cope and to make the new a part of everyday life, Relationships and social support - hindrances and facilitators, and Longing for “normality.” Results imply that patients struggle with physiological, psychological and social aspects related to food and eating, and use coping mechanisms to facilitate their eating problems. The best practice for rehabilitation and follow‐up must be established in order to meet the multifaceted needs of head and neck cancer survivors.

  • 2.
    Emilsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svensk, Ann-Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Support group participation during the post-operative radiotherapy period increases levels of coping resources among women with breast cancer.2012In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 591-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Support group participation during the post-operative radiotherapy period increases levels of coping resources among women with breast cancer Being diagnosed with breast cancer is a traumatic experience that can elevate levels of distress and cause depletion of coping resources in many of the disease's victims. This non-randomised case-control study among breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy indicates that participation in a support group that focuses on communication and mutual sharing between its member's has positive effects and increases levels of coping resources assessed with the Coping Resources Inventory (CRI). Results of the CRI showed a significant difference between the study group and control group in the social domain at the second occasion of measurement (P= 0.007) and in the emotional domain at the third occasion (P= 0.028). Within the study group, over time, increased levels of coping resources reached significant levels concerning the emotional domain at the second occasion (P= 0.025). Conversely, coping resources were decreased in the same domain within the control group over time, at the third occasion (P= 0.053). Additionally, anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, showing no difference between the groups. This study shows that participation in a support group during post-operative radiotherapy can be socially and emotionally strengthening because of the opportunity for the patients to mutually share experiences.

  • 3. Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gaston-Johansson, F
    Danielson, E
    Significant improvement in quality of life of patients with incurable cancer after designation to a palliative homecare team2010In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to describe and compare quality of life before and after designation to a palliative homecare team in patients with different cancer diagnoses and to identify pre-designation predictors of post-designation global quality of life. We measured patients' quality of life 1 week before designation and 11 days (median time) after with the Assessment of Quality of life at the End of Life (Axelsson & Sjödén 1999). Of 163 eligible patients 63 participated without attrition. Patients' quality of life improved in the physical, psychological, medical and global areas. Six items significantly improved: hours recumbent during the day (P = 0.009), nausea (P = 0.008), anxiety (P = 0.007), getting hold of staff (P = 0.000), received care (P = 0.003) and global quality of life (P = 0.023). Depression/low in mood (r = 0.55) and meaningfulness (r = 0.70) associated to global quality of life. Furthermore, pain (P = 0.028) and meaningfulness (P = 0.028) predicted global quality of life. In the existential area, it is important to further explore how meaningfulness is associated to and predicts global quality of life.

  • 4.
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Why promote 'spirituality' uncritically?2014In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 819-820Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Senn, B
    et al.
    Kirsch, M
    Sanz, CC
    Karlou, C
    Tulus, K
    de Leeuw, J
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Goossens, GA
    Cleary, V
    How cancer research could benefit from the Complex Intervention Framework: students' experiences of the European Academy of Nursing Science summer school2011In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Svensk, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Öster, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Egberg Thyme, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    Sjödin, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Eisemann, Martin
    Department of Psychology, University of Tromsøe, Tromsøe, Norway.
    Åström, Sture
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindh, Jack
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Art therapy improves experienced quality of life among women undergoing treatment for breast cancer: A randomized controlled study2009In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with breast cancer are naturally exposed to strain related to diagnosis and treatment, and this influences their experienced quality of life (QoL). The present paper reports the effect, with regard to QoL aspects, of an art therapy intervention among 41 women undergoing radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer. The women were randomized to an intervention group with individual art therapy sessions for 1 h/week (n = 20), or to a control group (n = 21). The WHOQOL-BREF and EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-BR23, were used for QoL assessment, and administrated on three measurement occasions, before the start of radiotherapy and 2 and 6 months later. The results indicate an overall improvement in QoL aspects among women in the intervention group. A significant increase in total health, total QoL, physical health and psychological health was observed in the art therapy group. A significant positive difference within the art therapy group was also seen, concerning future perspectives, body image and systemic therapy side effects. The present study provides strong support for the use of art therapy to improve QoL for women undergoing radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer.

  • 7. Udo, C.
    et al.
    Lövgren, M.
    Lundquist, G.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palliative care physicians' experiences of end-of-life communication: A focus group study2018In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 27, no 1, article id e12728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore palliative home care physicians' experiences regarding end-of-life breakpoint communication (BPC). This is a qualitative study where focus group interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that the participants saw themselves as being responsible for accomplishing BPC, and they were convinced that it should be regarded as a process of communication initiated at an early stage, i.e. proactively. However, BPC was often conducted as a reaction to the patient's sudden deterioration or sometimes not at all. The barriers to achieving proactive BPC included physicians' uncertainty regarding the timing of BPC, primarily due to difficulties in prognostication in terms of time of death, and uncertainty as to what BPC should include and how it should best be approached. Furthermore, there was insufficient documentation regarding previous BPC, which impeded proactive BPC. Although our study shows that physicians are ambitious when it comes to the communication of information to patients and families, there is a need for further training in how to conduct BPC and when to initiate the BPC process. Furthermore, there should be documentation that different professionals can access as this would appear to facilitate a proactive BPC process.

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