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  • 1. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Zhou, Renke
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Olson, Sara
    Scheurer, Michael
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Lachance, Daniel
    Lau, Ching
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Houlston, Richard
    Jenkins, Robert
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Merrell, Ryan
    Davis, Faith
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    DEMOGRAPHICS AND LIFESTYLE FACTORS IN GLIOMA RISK: A REPORT FROM THE GLIOMA INTERNATIONAL CASE-CONTROL STUDY2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 57-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Scheurer, Michael E.
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Olson, Sara H.
    Lai, Rose
    Lachance, Daniel
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Zhou, Renke
    Wiemels, Joseph
    Lau, Ching
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Houlston, Richard
    Shete, Sanjay
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Jenkins, Robert
    Davis, Faith
    Merrell, Ryan
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    ATOPIC CONDITIONS, ANTIHISTAMINE USE, AND GLIOMA RISK: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE GLIOMA INTERNATIONAL CASE-CONTROL STUDY2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 32-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Andersen, Zorana J.
    et al.
    Pedersen, Marie
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Galassi, Claudia
    Jørgensen, Jeanette T.
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aasvang, Gunn Marit
    Schwarze, Per
    Pyko, Andrei
    Pershagen, Göran
    Korek, Michal
    De Faire, Ulf
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Eriksen, Kirsten T.
    Poulsen, Aslak H.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Vaclavik Bräuner, Elvira
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Jaensch, Andrea
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Lang, Alois
    Wang, Meng
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Grioni, Sara
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Migliore, Enrica
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Sokhi, Ranjeet
    Keuken, Menno
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Beelen, Rob
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Long-term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Brain Tumor: the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 420-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and brain tumor risk is sparse and inconsistent.

    Methods: In 12 cohorts from 6 European countries, individual estimates of annual mean air pollution levels at the baseline residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the ESCAPE and TRANSPHORM projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5, ≤10, and 2.5–10 μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx) and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations of air pollutant concentrations and traffic intensity with total, malignant, and nonmalignant brain tumor, in separate Cox regression models, adjusting for risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

    Results: Of 282194 subjects from 12 cohorts, 466 developed malignant brain tumors during 12 years of follow-up. Six of the cohorts also had data on nonmalignant brain tumor, where among 106786 subjects, 366 developed brain tumor: 176 nonmalignant and 190 malignant. We found a positive, statistically nonsignificant association between malignant brain tumor and PM2.5 absorbance (hazard ratio and 95% CI: 1.67; 0.89–3.14 per 10–5/m3), and weak positive or null associations with the other pollutants. Hazard ratio for PM2.5 absorbance (1.01; 0.38–2.71 per 10–5/m3) and all other pollutants were lower for nonmalignant than for malignant brain tumors.

    Conclusion: We found suggestive evidence of an association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 absorbance indicating traffic-related air pollution and malignant brain tumors, and no association with overall or nonmalignant brain tumors.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Degerman, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Dahlin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brannstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Melin, B. S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    TELOMERE LENGTH, ALLERGIES AND RISK OF GLIOMA2017In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 19, no Supplement: 3, p. 23-23, article id Meeting Abstract: P01.03Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wibom, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Cederquist, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Aradottir, Steina
    Borg, Åke
    Armstrong, Georgina N.
    Shete, Sanjay
    Lau, Ching C.
    Bainbridge, Matthew N.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Lai, Rose
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Houlston, Richard S.
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Olson, Sara H.
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Lachance, Daniel H.
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Davis, Faith G.
    Merrell, Ryan
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    Melin, Beatrice S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 1333-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods: Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer. The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results: We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions: Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes.

  • 6. Badr, Christian E
    et al.
    Wurdinger, Thomas
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Neuro-oncology Research Group, Department of Neurosurgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Niers, Johanna M
    Whalen, Michael
    Degterev, Alexei
    Tannous, Bakhos A
    Lanatoside C sensitizes glioblastoma cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and induces an alternative cell death pathway.2011In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 1213-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human glioblastoma (GBM) cells are notorious for their resistance to apoptosis-inducing therapeutics. We have identified lanatoside C as a sensitizer of GBM cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death partly by upregulation of the death receptor 5. We show that lanatoside C sensitizes GBM cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a GBM xenograft model in vivo. Lanatoside C on its own serves as a therapeutic agent against GBM by activating a caspase-independent cell death pathway. Cells treated with lanatoside C showed necrotic cell morphology with absence of caspase activation, low mitochondrial membrane potential, and early intracellular ATP depletion. In conclusion, lanatoside C sensitizes GBM cells to TRAIL-induced cell death and mitigates apoptosis resistance of glioblastoma cells by inducing an alternative cell death pathway. To our knowledge, this is one of the first examples of use of caspase-independent cell death inducers to trigger tumor regression in vivo. Activation of such mechanism may be a useful strategy to counter resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  • 7.
    Björkblom, Benny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Späth, Florentin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    PRE-DIAGNOSTIC PLASMA METABOLITES LINKED TO FUTURE BRAIN TUMOR DEVELOPMENT2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 288-289Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study is a unique population-based biobank linked to the clinical data registries. The samples originate from over 133 000 individuals living in the northern part of Sweden, and primarily collected during health checkups from the age of 40 years. Our project aims to investigate alterations in metabolite signatures in blood plasma of healthy blood donors that later in life developed a tumor. Brain tumors, especially glioblastoma is associated with poor prognosis. To explore early events of metabolic reprograming linked to future diagnosis, we investigated alterations in metabolite concentrations in plasma collected several years before diagnosis with matched healthy controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total 392 analytical samples (256 repeated timepoint and 136 single timepoint, case-control samples) were analyzed using GCTOFMS. Constrained randomization of run order was utilized to maximize information output and minimize the false discovery rate. By use of reference databases, we could with high confidence quantify and identify 150 plasma metabolites. We detected metabolites with significant alterations in concertation between pre-clinical glioma cases and healthy controls by the effect projection approach based on orthogonal partial least squares (OPLSEP). RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For the repeated blood samples, we designed and applied a novel multivariate strategy for high resolution biomarker pattern discovery. We utilize the fact that we have available samples from two repeated time points prior to diagnosis for each future glioma case and their matched controls to construct a small design of experiment (DoE) of four samples for each match pair. The data for each individual DoE was evaluated by OPLS-EP to determine the effect of each individual metabolite in relation to control-case, time and their interaction. Finally, latent significance calculations by means of OPLS were used to extract and evaluate the correct latent biomarker and highlight true significance of individual metabolites. Our study presents an approach to minimize confounding effects due to systematic noise from sampling, the analytical method, as well as take into account personalized metabolic levels over time, enabling biomarker detection within a smaller sample group. We will present and discuss the latest results and biomarkers from this exploratory metabolomics study at the meeting

  • 8. Bondy, Melissa
    et al.
    Bainbridge, Matthew
    Jhangiani, Shalini
    Jalali, Ali
    Plon, Sharon E.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Davis, Faith
    Houlston, Richard
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Jenkins, Robert
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Lachance, Daniel
    Lai, Rose
    Lau, Ching
    Merrell, Ryan
    Olson, Sara
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Shete, Sanjay
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gibbs, Richard A.
    POT1 GERMLINE MUTATIONS MAY EXPLAIN A SUBSET OF FAMILIAL GLIOMA: A REPORT FROM THE GLIOGENE CONSORTIUM2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 89-89Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Chinot, Olivier
    et al.
    Garcia, Josep
    Romain, Sylvie
    Revil, Cedric
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    Mason, Warren
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saran, Frank
    Carpentier, Antoine F.
    Hoang-Xuan, Khe
    Kavan, Petr
    Cernea, Dana M.
    Brandes, Alba A.
    Kerloeguen, Yannick
    Mancao, Christoph
    Ouafik, L'Houcine
    Abrey, Lauren
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Tabouret, Emeline
    BASELINE PLASMA MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9 (MMP9) PREDICTS OVERALL SURVIVAL (OS) BENEFIT FROM BEVACIZUMAB INDEPENDENTLY OF MOLECULAR SUBTYPES IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED GLIOBLASTOMA: RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF AVAglio2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 5-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Chinot, Olivier L.
    et al.
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Mason, Warren
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center Stockholm Gotland, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saran, Frank
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    Garcia, Josep
    Revil, Cedric
    Abrey, Lauren
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Upfront bevacizumab may extend survival for glioblastoma patients who do not receive second-line therapy: an exploratory analysis of AVAglio2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1313-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In this post-hoc, exploratory analysis, we examined outcomes for patients enrolled in the AVAglio trial of front-line bevacizumab or placebo plus radiotherapy/temozolomide who received only a single line of therapy. Methods: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma received protocol-defined treatment until progressive disease (PD). Co-primary endpoints were investigator-assessed progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). After confirmed PD, patients were treated at the investigators' discretion. PFS/OS were assessed in patients with a PFS event who did not receive post-PD therapy (Group 1) and patients with a PFS event who received post-PD therapy plus patients who did not have a PFS event at the final data cutoff (Group 2). Kaplan-Meier methodology was used. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model for known prognostic variables was generated. Results: Baseline characteristics were balanced. In patients with a PFS event who did not receive post-PD therapy (Group 1; n = 225 [24.4% of the intent-to-treat population]), the addition of bevacizumab to radiotherapy/temozolomide resulted in a 3.6-month extension in both median PFS (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62, P =.0016) and median OS (HR: 0.67, P =.0102). Multivariate analyses supported this OS benefit (HR: 0.66). In the remaining patients (Group 2; n = 696), a 5.2-month PFS extension was observed in bevacizumab-treated patients (HR: 0.61, P<.0001); OS was comparable between the treatment arms (HR: 0.88, P =.1502). No significant differences in safety were observed between the 2 groups. Conclusion: This exploratory analysis suggests that the addition of bevacizumab to standard glioblastoma treatment prolongs PFS and OS for patients with PD who receive only one line of therapy.

  • 11. Chinot, Olivier L.
    et al.
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Mason, Warren
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Reg Canc Ctr Stockholm,.
    Saran, Frank
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Carpentier, Antoine F.
    Hoang-Xuan, Khe
    Kavan, Petr
    Cernea, Dana
    Brandes, Alba A.
    Hilton, Magalie
    Kerloeguen, Yannick
    Guijarro, Abajo
    Cloughsey, Timothy
    FINAL EFFICACY AND SAFETY RESULTS FROM AVAglio, A PHASE III TRIAL OF BEVACIZUMAB (BEV) PLUS TEMOZOLOMIDE (TMZ) ANDRADIOTHERAPY (RT) IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED GLIOBLASTOMA2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 105-106Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Chinot, Olivier L.
    et al.
    Wick, Wolfgang
    van den Bent, Martin J.
    Mason, Warren
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saran, Frank
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Revil, Cedric
    Kerloeguen, Yannick
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    Re-analysis of PFS/response using original Macdonald criteria and response evaluation criteria in solid tumors in the phase III AVAglio study of bevacizumab plus radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, no suppl 5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Cloughesy, Tim
    et al.
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Mason, Warren
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saran, Frank
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Carpentier, Antoine F.
    Hoang-Xuan, Khe
    Kavan, Petr
    Cernea, Dana
    Brandes, Alba A.
    Revil, Cedric
    Abrey, Lauren
    Chinot, Olivier L.
    Survival analysis of patients with a PFS event who did not receive post-progression therapy in AVAglio (bevacizumab [BEV] plus radiotherapy [RT] and temozolomide [TMZ] for newly diagnosed glioblastoma [GBM])2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, no 5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Eckel-Passow, Jeanette
    et al.
    Decker, Paul
    Kosel, Matthew
    Kollmeyer, Thomas
    Molinaro, Annette
    Rice, Terri
    Caron, Alissa
    Drucker, Kristen
    Praska, Corinne
    Pekmezci, Melike
    Hansen, Helen
    McCoy, Lucie
    Bracci, Paige
    Erickson, Bradley
    Wiemels, Joseph
    Wiencke, John
    Bondy, Melissa
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Burns, Terry
    Giannini, Caterina
    Lachance, Daniel
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Jenkins, Robert
    USING GERMLINE VARIANTS TO PREDICT GLIOMA RISK AND IDENTIFY GLIOMA SUBTYPE PRE-OPERATIVELY2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 82-82Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to be associated with overall glioma risk or with risk of specific subtypes of glioma. We hypothesized that the inclusion of these 25 SNPs with patient age at diagnosis and sex could predict risk of glioma as well as predict IDH mutation status. Thus, case-control design and multinomial logistic regression were used to develop models to estimate the risk of glioma development while accounting for molecular subtypes. Case-case design and logistic regression were used to develop models to predict IDH mutation status. Each model included all 25 glioma risk SNPs, patient age at diagnosis and sex. A total of 1273 glioma cases and 443 controls from Mayo Clinic were used in the discovery set, and 852 glioma cases and 231 controls from UCSF were used in the validation set. All samples were genotyped using a custom Illumina OncoArray. We observed that patients in the highest 5% of the risk score had more than a 14-fold increased relative risk of developing an IDH-mutant glioma, compared to patients with median risk score. Large differences in lifetime absolute risk were observed at the extremes of the risk score percentile categories. For both IDH-mutated 1p/19q non-codeleted glioma and IDH-mutated 1p/19q-codeleted glioma, the lifetime risk increased from almost null to 2.3% and almost null to 1.7%, respectively. The SNP-based model that predicted IDH mutation status had a validation c-index of 0.85. These results suggest that germline genotyping has the potential to provide a new tool for clinicians for the initial management of newly-discovered brain lesions. Specifically, given the low lifetime risk of glioma, SNP-based risk scores should not be useful for general population screening. However, with further research these risk scores may be useful in certain clinically-defined high-risk groups.

  • 15. Eckel-Passow, Jeanette
    et al.
    Decker, Paul
    Kosel, Matthew
    Kollmeyer, Thomas
    Sarkar, Gobinda
    Caron, Alissa
    Bracci, Paige
    Hansen, Helen
    Madsen, Nils
    McCoy, Lucie
    Molinaro, Annette
    Rice, Terri
    Walsh, Kyle
    Giannini, Caterina
    Parney, Ian
    Wiemels, Joseph
    Wiencke, John
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    Lachance, Daniel
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Jenkins, Robert
    ASSOCIATION OF KNOWN GLIOMA GERMLINE RISK SNPs WITHIN MOLECULARLY-DEFINED GROUPS2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 57-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.
    et al.
    Decker, Paul A.
    Kosel, Matt L.
    Kollmeyer, Thomas M.
    Molinaro, Annette M.
    Rice, Terri
    Caron, Alissa A.
    Drucker, Kristen L.
    Praska, Corinne E.
    Pekmezci, Melike
    Hansen, Helen M.
    McCoy, Lucie S.
    Bracci, Paige M.
    Erickson, Bradley J.
    Lucchinetti, Claudia F.
    Wiemels, Joseph L.
    Wiencke, John K.
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Burns, Terry C.
    Giannini, Caterina
    Lachance, Daniel H.
    Wrensch, Margaret R.
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Using germline variants to estimate glioma and subtype risks2019In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 451-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Twenty-five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with adult diffuse glioma risk. We hypothesized that the inclusion of these 25 SNPs with age at diagnosis and sex could estimate risk of glioma as well as identify glioma subtypes.

    Methods: Case-control design and multinomial logistic regression were used to develop models to estimate the risk of glioma development while accounting for histologic and molecular subtypes. Case-case design and logistic regression were used to develop models to predict isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status. A total of 1273 glioma cases and 443 controls from Mayo Clinic were used in the discovery set, and 852 glioma cases and 231 controls from UCSF were used in the validation set. All samples were genotyped using a custom Illumina OncoArray.

    Results: Patients in the highest 5% of the risk score had more than a 14-fold increase in relative risk of developing an IDH mutant glioma. Large differences in lifetime absolute risk were observed at the extremes of the risk score percentile. For both IDH mutant 1p/19q non-codeleted glioma and IDH mutant 1p/19q codeleted glioma, the lifetime risk increased from almost null to 2.3% and almost null to 1.7%, respectively. The SNP-based model that predicted IDH mutation status had a validation concordance index of 0.85.

    Conclusions: These results suggest that germline genotyping can provide new tools for the initial management of newly discovered brain lesions. Given the low lifetime risk of glioma, risk scores will not be useful for population screening; however, they may be useful in certain clinically defined high-risk groups.

  • 17. Ellingson, Benjamin
    et al.
    Abrey, Lauren
    Garcia, Josep
    Chinot, Olivier
    Aftab, Dana
    Schwab, Gisela
    Revil, Cedric
    Saran, Frank
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hessel, Colin
    Harris, Robert
    Woodworth, Davis
    Leu, Kevin
    Lai, Albert
    Sahebjam, Solmaz
    Pope, Whitney
    Mason, Warren
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Wen, Patrick
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    RESIDUAL ENHANCING TUMOR VOLUME IS A STRONG PROGNOSTIC BIOMARKER FOR SURVIVAL IN BOTH NEWLY DIAGNOSED AND RECURRENT GBM REGARDLESS OF THERAPY: EVIDENCE FROM 1,535 PATIENTS IN SINGLE AND MULTICENTER TRIALS2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 131-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Ellingson, Benjamin M.
    et al.
    Abrey, Lauren E.
    Garcia, Josep
    Chinot, Olivier
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Saran, Frank
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mason, Warren P.
    Harris, Robert J.
    Leu, Kevin
    Woodworth, Davis C.
    Mehta, Arnav
    Raymond, Catalina
    Chakhoyan, Ararat
    Pope, Whitney B.
    Cloughesy, Timothy F.
    Post-chemoradiation volumetric response predicts survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with radiation, temozolomide, and bevacizumab or placebo2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 1525-1535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In the current study we used contrast-enhanced T1 subtraction maps to test whether early changes in enhancing tumor volume are prognostic for overall survival (OS) in newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) patients treated with chemoradiation with or without bevacizumab (BV). Methods. Seven hundred ninety-eight patients (404 BV and 394 placebo) with newly diagnosed GBM in the AVAglio trial (NCT00943826) had baseline MRI scans available, while 337 BV-treated and 269 placebo-treated patients had > 4 MRI scans for response evaluation. The volume of contrast-enhancing tumor was quantified and used for subsequent analyses. Results. A decrease in tumor volume during chemoradiation was associated with a longer OS in the placebo group (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.578, P < 0.0001) but not BV-treated group (HR = 1.135, P = 0.4889). Results showed a higher OS in patients on the placebo arm with a sustained decrease in tumor volume using a post-chemoradiation baseline (HR = 1.692, P = 0.0005), and a trend toward longer OS was seen in BV-treated patients (HR = 1.264, P = 0.0724). Multivariable Cox regression confirmed that sustained response or stable disease was prognostic for OS (HR = 0.7509, P = 0.0127) when accounting for age (P = 0.0002), KPS (P = 0.1516), postsurgical tumor volume (P < 0.0001), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase status (P < 0.0001), and treatment type (P = 0.7637) using the post-chemoradiation baseline. Conclusions. The post-chemoradiation timepoint is a better baseline for evaluating efficacy in newly diagnosed GBM. Early progression during the maintenance phase is consequential in predicting OS, supporting the use of progression-free survival rates as a meaningful surrogate for GBM.

  • 19. Ellingson, Benjamin M.
    et al.
    Abrey, Lauren E.
    Nelson, Sarah J.
    Kaufmann, Timothy J.
    Garcia, Josep
    Chinot, Olivier
    Saran, Frank
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center Stockholm.
    Mason, Warren P.
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Butowski, Nicholas
    Ligon, Keith L.
    Gerstner, Elizabeth R.
    Colman, Howard
    de Groot, John
    Chang, Susan
    Mellinghoff, Ingo
    Young, Robert J.
    Alexander, Brian M.
    Colen, Rivka
    Taylor, Jennie W.
    Arrillaga-Romany, Isabel
    Mehta, Arnav
    Huang, Raymond Y.
    Pope, Whitney B.
    Reardon, David
    Batchelor, Tracy
    Prados, Michael
    Galanis, Evanthia
    Wen, Patrick Y.
    Cloughesy, Timothy F.
    Validation of postoperative residual contrast-enhancing tumor volume as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1240-1250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In the current study, we pooled imaging data in newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) patients from international multicenter clinical trials, single institution databases, and multicenter clinical trial consortiums to identify the relationship between postoperative residual enhancing tumor volume and overall survival (OS). Methods. Data from 1511 newly diagnosed GBM patients from 5 data sources were included in the current study: (i) a single institution database from UCLA (N = 398; Discovery); (ii) patients from the Ben and Cathy Ivy Foundation for Early Phase Clinical Trials Network Radiogenomics Database (N = 262 from 8 centers; Confirmation); (iii) the chemoradiation placebo arm from an international phase III trial (AVAglio; N = 394 from 120 locations in 23 countries; Validation); (iv) the experimental arm from AVAglio examining chemoradiation plus bevacizumab (N = 404 from 120 locations in 23 countries; Exploratory Set 1); and (v) an Alliance (N0874) phase I/II trial of vorinostat plus chemoradiation (N = 53; Exploratory Set 2). Postsurgical, residual enhancing disease was quantified using T1 subtraction maps. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to determine influence of clinical variables, O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status, and residual tumor volume on OS. Results. A log-linear relationship was observed between postoperative, residual enhancing tumor volume and OS in newly diagnosed GBM treated with standard chemoradiation. Postoperative tumor volume is a prognostic factor for OS (P < 0.01), regardless of therapy, age, and MGMT promoter methylation status. Conclusion. Postsurgical, residual contrast-enhancing disease significantly negatively influences survival in patients with newly diagnosed GBM treated with chemoradiation with or without concomitant experimental therapy.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bergenheim, A. Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Sandström, M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    TREATMENT OF GLIOBLASTOMA: IMPROVEMENTS OVER TWO DECADES AT A SINGLE CENTRE2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 236-236Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a rapidly progressing tumour with a short overall survival. The treatment of GBM has evolved over the last decades and is today multimodal including surgery with maximal tumour resection followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy for patients in good performance status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the development of treatment and the outcome for GBM patients at a single centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 244 patients treated for GBM 2005 - 2015 has been included in a tissue bank with tumour tissue and/or blood samples. A clinical database has been set up with basic patient characteristics and details on surgery and non-surgical treatment. Survival was also studied for all 571 patients in our region diagnosed with GBM between 1995 and 2015. RESULTS: The overall median survival for all patients from 1995 to 2015 was 9.3 months. There was a stepwise improvement from 6.9 to 10.3 months for patients diagnosed 1995–1996 and 2010–2015, respectively (p<0.05). The two-year survival for the same time periods improved from 7.4% to 17.8% (p<0.01). After the introduction of postoperative radiochemotherapy for patients in good performance status in 2005 an increased survival was noted. The implementation of intraoperative 5-aminolevulinic acid did, in patients that underwent tumour resection, increase the number of total tumour resections (≥95%) from 32.6% to 54.1% (p<0.001). Positive prognostic factors were young age, good performance status, absence of diabetes or metabolic disease, total tumour resection and completion of postoperative radiochemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study are in line with earlier results regarding survival and prognostic factors. Despite the improvements made, the prognosis is still dismal and the need for further research on GBM treatment is great.

  • 21.
    Ghasimi, Soma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Haapasalo, H.
    Eray, M.
    Korhonen, K.
    Brannstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Immunohistochemical analysis of LRIG proteins in meningiomas: correlation between estrogen receptor status and LRIG expression2012In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 14, no Suppl 3, p. 69-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22. Heimberger, Amy
    et al.
    Liu, Yanhong
    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad
    Amirian, E. Susan
    Tsavachidis, Spiridon
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Zhou, Renke
    Wei, Jun
    Ivan, Cristina
    Calin, George
    Scheurer, Michael
    Dahlin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    POLYMORPHISMS IN MYELOID-ASSOCIATED GENES PREDICT GLIOMA SURVIVAL2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 58-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Jalali, Ali
    et al.
    Bainbridge, Matthew
    Jhangiani, Shalini
    Plon, Sharon E.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Davis, Faith
    Houlston, Richard
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Jenkins, Robert
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Lachance, Daniel
    Lai, Rose
    Lau, Ching
    Merrell, Ryan
    Olson, Sara H.
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Shete, Sanjay
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gibbs, Richard A.
    Bondy, Melissa
    CHROMOSOME 17q LINKAGE SEQUENCING IN FAMILIAL GLIOMA: A REPORT FROM THE GLIOGENE CONSORTIUM2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 90-90Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24. Jenkins, Robert
    et al.
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Kollmeyer, Thomas
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Olson, Sara
    Lai, Rose
    Lachance, Daniel
    Lau, Ching
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Houlston, Richard
    Shete, Sanjay
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Davis, Faith
    Merrell, Ryan
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    THE FREQUENCY OF THE RS55705857 RISK ALLELE IS ELEVATED AND SIMILAR IN FAMILIAL AND SPORADIC GLIOMA PATIENTS2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 90-90Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brannstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    MOLECULAR CLASSIFICATION OF MALIGNANT GLIOMA2017In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 19, no Supplement: 3, p. 88-88, article id Meeting Abstract: P10.15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Johansson, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Oudin, Anaïs
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Tiemann, Katja
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Bernard, Amandine
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Golebiewska, Anna
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Keunen, Olivier
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Fack, Fred
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Stieber, Daniel
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    Wang, Baofeng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Niclou, Simone P.
    NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Oncology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Luxembourg.
    The soluble form of the tumor suppressor Lrig1 potently inhibits in vivo glioma growth irrespective of EGF receptor status2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1200-1211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deregulated growth factor signaling is a major driving force in the initiation and progression of glioblastoma. The tumor suppressor and stem cell marker Lrig1 is a negative regulator of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. Here, we addressed the therapeutic potential of the soluble form of Lrig1 (sLrig1) in glioblastoma treatment and the mechanism of sLrig1-induced growth inhibition. With use of encapsulated cells, recombinant sLrig1 was locally delivered in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts generated from freshly isolated patient tumors. Tumor growth and mouse survival were evaluated. The efficacy of sLrig1 and the affected downstream signaling was studied in vitro and in vivo in glioma cells displaying variable expression of wild-type and/or a constitutively active EGFR mutant (EGFRvIII). Continuous interstitial delivery of sLrig1 in genetically diverse patient-derived glioma xenografts led to strong tumor growth inhibition. Glioma cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo were potently inhibited by sLrig1, irrespective of EGFR expression levels. Of importance, tumor growth was also suppressed in EGFRvIII-driven glioma. sLrig1 induced cell cycle arrest without changing total receptor level or phosphorylation. Affected downstream effectors included MAP kinase but not AKT signaling. Of importance, local delivery of sLrig1 into established tumors led to a 32 survival advantage in treated mice. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that sLrig1 is a potent inhibitor of glioblastoma growth in clinically relevant experimental glioma models and that this effect is largely independent of EGFR status. The potent anti-tumor effect of sLrig1, in combination with cell encapsulation technology for in situ delivery, holds promise for future treatment of glioblastoma.

  • 27.
    Johansson, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Oudin, Anaïs
    Tiemann, Katja
    Bernard, Amandine
    Keunen, Olivier
    Fack, Fred
    Golebiewska, Anna
    Stieber, Daniel
    Wang, Baofeng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Niclou, Simone P.
    The soluble form of the tumor suppressor Lrig1 potently inhibits in vivo glioma growth irrespective of EGF receptor status2012In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 14, no Suppl. 3, p. 15-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28. Kiesel, Barbara
    et al.
    Thome, Carina M.
    Weiss, Tobias
    Jakola, Asgeir
    Darlix, Amelie
    Pellerino, Alessia
    Furtner, Julia
    Kerschbaumer, Johannes
    Weller, Michael
    Pilkington, Geoffrey
    Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Watts, Colin
    Ruda, Roberta
    Reifenberger, Guido
    Oberg, Ingela
    Honnorat, Jerome
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Preusser, Matthias
    Widhalm, Georg
    Berghoff, Anna
    PERIOPERATIVE IMAGING OF BRAIN METASTASES: A EUROPEAN ASSOCIATION OF NEURO-ONCOLOGY (EANO) YOUNGSTERS SURVEY2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 59-59Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Neurosurgical resection is an important treatment option in the multimodal therapy of brain metastases (BM). Perioperative imaging is established in primary brain tumors to assess the extent of resection. However, structured guidelines on the use of perioperative imaging for BM patients are so far missing.

    METHODS

    The European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) Youngsters committee designed a comprehensive questionnaire on the use of perioperative imaging. The survey was distributed to physicians with neuro-oncologic focus via the EANO and the European Association of Neurosurgical Societies (EANS) network.

    RESULTS

    120 physicians from non-European countries and European countries responded to the survey. 76/120 neurosurgeons, 18/120 radiation oncologists and 17/120 neurologists participated. 89/120 participants worked at academic hospitals and 39/40 participants worked in high patient volume centers as defined by >50 BM cases per year. Local standard operating procedures for perioperative imaging were applied by 94/120 physicians. The preferred preoperative imaging method represented MRI for 112/120 (93.3%) participants. Postsurgical imaging was routinely performed by 106/120 physicians. 77/120 participants indicated MRI as the preferred postoperative imaging method, however, only 71/120 performed postoperative MRI imaging within 72 hours after resection. No correlation of postsurgical MRI and localization at an academic hospital (58/79 [73.4%] vs. 19/27 [70.4%], p>0.05) or patient volume (49/71 [69%] vs 25/40 [62.5%], p>0.05) was evident. The most frequently indicated reason for postsurgical imaging was the assessment of extent of resection as participants indicated to adjust the radiotherapy plan or even considered re-surgery to achieve complete resection. CONCLUSIONS: This EANO survey indicates that preoperative MRI is the preferred imaging technique for the majority of physicians, whereas a high variability of postoperative neuroimaging routines including CT and MRI was observed. International guidelines for perioperative imaging with special focus on postoperative MRI are warranted in order to optimize perioperative treatment modalities for BM patients.

  • 29. Langer, Julia
    et al.
    Elustondo, Fernando Abaitua
    Chan, Eric Chun Yong
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Want, Elizabeth
    ONeill, Kevin
    Syed, Nelofer
    Metabolomic analysis of glioblastoma multiforme upon arginine deprivation treatment2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, no 5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Liu, Yanhong
    et al.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Rajaraman, Preetha
    Chanock, Stephen
    Bondy, Melissa
    Insight in glioma susceptibility through an analysis of 6p22.3, 12p13.33-12.1, 17q22-23.2 and 18q23 snp genotypes in familial and non-familial glioma2012In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 14, no Suppl. 6, p. 51-52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31. Malmstrom, A.
    et al.
    Akesson, L.
    Asklund, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kinhult, S.
    Werlenius, K.
    Hesselager, G.
    Hylin, S.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    GENDER DIFFERENCES IN GLIOMA - FINDINGS FROM THE SWEDISH NATIONAL QUALITY REGISTRY FOR PRIMARY BRAIN TUMORS2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 267-267Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    An often debated topic in neuro-oncology are the differences in incidence and survival between men and women with glioma. To the Swedish National Quality Registry for Primary Brain Tumors (SNQR) over 90% of all Swedish patients with primary brain tumor have been reported since 1999. We therefore conducted a study of clinical factors in relation to gender in patients registered with high grade glioma using data from the SNQR.

    Methods

    The SNQR was searched for patients diagnosed with high grade glioma from 1999 through 2016 and clinical data were analyzed for gender differences regarding prognostic factors, tumor location and survival.

    Results

    In all 5470 patients were identified, 2268 women and 3202 men, giving a ratio of 1:1.4. We found a survival benefit for women when analyzing the whole time period. While there was no difference in median survival (315 versus 326 days for women versus men), there were significantly more long term survivors among women, with mean survival being 742 versus 628 days (p=0.03). The survival benefit for women was also only present in those being younger than 50 years at diagnosis. We looked at the prognostic factors age, performance status (PS) and surgery in relation to gender. We found that median age for being diagnosed with high grade glioma was significantly higher in women than men (63 versus 62 years, p=0.002) and the ratio of women in relation to men increases with increasing age, the ratios for younger than 50 years being 1:1.5 and over 50 years 1:1.39. A higher fraction of the women are over 60 years when diagnosed compared to men (57% vs 53%, p=0.002). For PS we identified that significantly more women were reported to have PS 3 and for men more PS 0 was registered. For type of surgery we found no gender differences. For tumor location more women had tumors in the frontal and less in the temporal lobe as compared to men.

    Conclusion

    In the Swedish National Quality Registry for Primary Brain Tumors we identified differences in incidence and survival between men and women related to age and also a disparity regarding PS and tumor location. If the cause of these clinical differences is due to molecular background or has other causes warrants further study.

  • 32. Malmstrom, A.
    et al.
    Kristenssen, B. Winther
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Soderkvist, P.
    INTERNATIONAL SURVEY REGARDING USE OF MGMT ANALYSES FOR GLIOMA2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 215-215Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: MGMT promotor methylation status is part of glioma diagnostics, supporting clinical decision making. Internationally different methods and cut-off levels are used to determine whether a tumor is methylated or unmethylated. Treatment decisions can be inadequate, when methylation status of the tumor can change due to the analysis and cutoff used. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted an international survey, consisting of 27 questions, to clarify which methods are regularly used in different clinico-pathological settings and why a specific method is selected. We also asked about opinions regarding an international consensus on methods and cut-off levels. RESULTS: The survey was answered by 146 respondents - mainly neuropathologists - from 24 countries. The responses show that MGMT methylation status is determined for all gliomas in 37% of laboratories, while 8% do not perform the analysis. The most commonly used methods are msPCR (37%) and pyrosequencing (34%). The main reasons for choosing a specific method are simplicity (56%), cost-effectiveness (49%) and reproducibility of results (49%). For those using pyrosequencing, the most common number of CpG sites analyzed is four, but varies between 1–3 and more than 16. For 50% of laboratories, the company producing the kit determines which CpG sites should be examined, while 33% select the sites themselves. Selection of cut-off is equally distributed between a cut-off a) published in the literature, b) defined by the lab or c) defined by the company performing the analysis. This cut-off varies between different pathology departments. In one lab tumor is determined as methylated in case of 1 methylated CpG site of 17 analyzed. For others cut-off for methylated varies from 1% to 30%. Some report tumor as unmethylated or weakly versus highly methylated. An international consensus on MGMT methylation method is believed to be of advantage by 66%, while only 20% do not find this necessary. A consensus on a cut-off is warranted by 76%. Most suggest that the consensus method should be msPCR (45%) or pyrosequencing (42%), while 17% suggest next generation sequencing. CONCLUSION: While analysis and use of MGMT methylation status has become routine in the clinico-pathological setting, there is still controversy regarding the best laboratory method and the clinically relevant cut-off level. Most respondents suggest that an international consensus on both method and cut-off should be established.

  • 33. McCarthy, Bridget J
    et al.
    Rankin, Kristin M
    Aldape, Ken
    Bondy, Melissa L
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Broholm, Helle
    Feychting, Maria
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Inskip, Peter D
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ruder, Avima M
    Butler, Mary Ann
    Scheurer, Michael E
    Schüz, Joachim
    Schwartzbaum, Judith A
    Wrensch, Margaret R
    Davis, Faith G
    Risk factors for oligodendroglial tumors: A pooled international study2011In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 242-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oligodendroglial tumors are rare subtypes of brain tumors and are often combined with other glial tumors in epidemiological analyses. However, different demographic associations and clinical characteristics suggest potentially different risk factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible risk factors for oligodendroglial tumors (including oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, and mixed glioma). Data from 7 case-control studies (5 US and 2 Scandinavian) were pooled. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for age group, gender, and study site. Data on 617 cases and 1260 controls were available for analyses. Using data from all 7 studies, history of allergies and/or asthma was associated with a decreased risk of anaplastic oligodendroglioma (OR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.9), and history of asthma only was associated with a decreased risk of oligodendroglioma (OR = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9) and anaplastic oligodendroglioma (OR = 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.9). A family history of brain tumors was associated with an increased risk of anaplastic oligodendroglioma (OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.5). Having had chicken pox was associated with a decreased risk of oligodendroglioma (OR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.9) and anaplastic oligodendroglioma (OR = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9) in the US studies. Although there is some overlap in risk factors between oligodendroglial tumors and gliomas as a group, it is likely that additional factors specific to oligodendroglial tumors have yet to be identified. Large, multi-institution international studies will be necessary to better characterize these etiological risk factors.

  • 34.
    Mörén, Lina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Metabolomic profiling of tumor tissue and serum in glioma patients reveals diagnostic and prognostic information2012In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 14, no Suppl. 6, p. 96-96, article id OM-24Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High-grade glioma is the most common brain tumor in adults, and the prognosis for patients diagnosed with this type of cancer is still poor. The biological behavior of the tumors is correlated to the classification and the World Health Organization (WHO) grading system, in which the grading reflects the increased aggressiveness. The classification system has been developed and improved over the years, but there are still problems with possible clinical implications. The histological features are not always easy to interpret, and diagnosis relies partly on personal experience of the neuropathologist. The most important component in the classification is the correlation between tumor grade and prognosis; however, the clinical reality shows a large variation in the survival of patients with glioblastomas and low-grade gliomas. Thus, there is a need for biomarkers to obtain a more reliable classification of glioma tumors and also prognostic markers. We have performed a metabolomic profiling study of 81 tissue samples and 96 corresponding serum samples from patients with different glioma diagnoses (glioblastoma or oligodendroglioma) and grades (WHO grades II, IIIs and IV). The samples were analyzed by a global screening strategy using gas chromatography/time of flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS). The acquired data were analyzed and evaluated by chemometrics-based bioinformatics methods in search for metabolite patterns of clinical relevance. We found metabolite patterns in both tissue and serum that distinguished glioblastomas from oligodendrogliomas and oligodendroglioma grade II from oligodendroglioma grade III. Interestingly, we also found metabolites elevated (eg, glycerol-3-phoshate, myo-inositol, ribitol, and fructose) and decreased (eg, octadecanoic acid and maltose) in glioblastoma patients that were associated with long survival (>3 years). Metabolite patterns associated with survival were also found in patients diagnosed with oligodendroglioma. These findings indicate that metabolomic profiling of glioma tissue and serum may be a valuable tool in future characterization of malignant glioma.

  • 35. Nowosielski, Martha
    et al.
    Ellingson, Benjamin M.
    Chinot, Olivier L.
    Garcia, Josep
    Revil, Cedric
    Radbruch, Alexander
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Mason, Warren P.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center Stockholm.
    Saran, Frank
    Kickingereder, Philipp
    Platten, Michael
    Sandmann, Thomas
    Abrey, Lauren E.
    Cloughesy, Timothy F.
    Bendszus, Martin
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Radiologic progression of glioblastoma under therapy: an exploratory analysis of AVAglio2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 557-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this exploratory analysis of AVAglio, a randomized phase III clinical study that investigated the addition of bevacizumab (Bev) to radiotherapy/temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma, we aim to radiologically characterize glioblastoma on therapy until progression and investigate whether the type of radiologic progression differs between treatment arms and is related to survival and molecular data. Five progression types (PTs) were categorized using an adapted algorithm according to MRI contrast enhancement behavior in T1- and T2-weighted images in 621 patients (Bev, n = 299; placebo, n = 322). Frequencies of PTs (designated as classic T1, cT1 relapse, T2 diffuse, T2 circumscribed, and primary nonresponder), time to progression (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed within each treatment arm and compared with molecular subtypes and O-6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status. PT frequencies differed between the Bev and placebo arms, except for "T2 diffuse" (12.4% and 7.1%, respectively). PTs showed differences in PFS and OS; with "T2 diffuse" being associated with longest survival. Complete disappearance of contrast enhancement during treatment ("cT1 relapse") showed longer survival than only partial contrast enhancement decrease ("classic T1"). "T2 diffuse" was more commonly MGMT hypermethylated. Only weak correlations to molecular subtypes from primary tissue were detected. Progression of glioblastoma under therapy can be characterized radiologically. These radiologic phenotypes are influenced by treatment and develop differently over time with differential outcomes. Complete resolution of contrast enhancement during treatment is a favorable factor for outcome.

  • 36. Ostrom, Quinn
    et al.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Amos, Christopher
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Lachance, Daniel
    Lai, Rose
    Merrell, Ryan
    Olson, Sara
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Shete, Sanjay
    Houlston, Richard
    Jenkins, Robert
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Bondy, Melissa
    PREVIOUSLY IDENTIFIED COMMON GLIOMA RISK SNPs ARE ASSOCIATED WITH FAMILIAL GLIOMA2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 108-108Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 5% of gliomas occur in individuals with a family history of glioma, and first-degree relatives of brain tumor cases have a two-fold increase in risk of brain tumor. Family-based studies have had little success in identifying high penetrance risk variants. Recent somatic characterization has shown that tumors from familial cases are indistinguishable from sporadic cases, suggesting that familial cases may arise through similar mechanisms of gliomagenesis, and therefore may be associated with common variants as well as rare mutations. In this analysis, we assessed whether previously identified common risk variants are associated with familial glioma.  METHODS: Data were obtained from the Glioma International Case Control (GICC) Study for 447 familial cases and 3,286 controls. We assessed 25 risk loci previously identified by glioma GWAS, and odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using an additive genetic logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, and the first principal component. Results were considered significant at p TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2B, TP53, and RTEL1. The strongest association was at rs55705857 (CCDC26, OR=2.5, p=1.14x10-14). These SNPs were further examined using a caseonly approach comparing familial to non-familial cases, and there was no significant difference in allele frequencies by family history status. CONCLUSIONS: In this analysis we identified a significant association between familial glioma and six common risk variants previously identified by glioma GWAS. This provides further evidence of shared pathways of genetic risk and gliomagenesis between familial and non-familial glioma. Further exploration is necessary to determine the overall contribution of common genetic variation to risk of familial glioma.

  • 37. Ostrom, Quinn T.
    et al.
    Coleman, Warren
    Huang, William
    Rubin, Joshua B.
    Lathia, Justin D.
    Berens, Michael E.
    Speyer, Gil
    Liao, Peter
    Wrensch, Margaret R.
    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Rice, Terri
    Wiencke, John K.
    McCoy, Lucie S.
    Hansen, Helen M.
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Houlston, Richard S.
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Lachance, Daniel H.
    Lai, Rose K.
    Merrell, Ryan T.
    Olson, Sara H.
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Schildkraut, Joellen M.
    Shete, Sanjay
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Rajaraman, Preetha
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Linet, Martha S.
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Yeager, Meredith
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.
    Freeman, Laura E. Beane
    Koutros, Stella
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Visvanathan, Kala
    Stevens, Victoria L.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Michaud, Dominique S.
    Feychting, Maria
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Giles, Graham G.
    Milne, Roger
    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Stampfer, Meir
    Ruder, Avima M.
    Carreon, Tania
    Hallmans, Goran
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Gaziano, J. Michael
    Sesso, Howard D.
    Purdue, Mark P.
    White, Emily
    Peters, Ulrike
    Buring, Julie
    Sex-specific gene and pathway modeling of inherited glioma risk2019In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 25 risk variants for glioma, explaining 30% of heritable risk. Most histologies occur with significantly higher incidence in males, and this difference is not explained by currently known risk factors. A previous GWAS identified sex-specific glioma risk variants, and this analysis aims to further elucidate risk variation by sex using gene- and pathway-based approaches. Methods Results from the Glioma International Case-Control Study were used as a testing set, and results from 3 GWAS were combined via meta-analysis and used as a validation set. Using summary statistics for nominally significant autosomal SNPs (P < 0.01 in a previous meta-analysis) and nominally significant X-chromosome SNPs (P < 0.01), 3 algorithms (Pascal, BimBam, and GATES) were used to generate gene scores, and Pascal was used to generate pathway scores. Results were considered statistically significant in the discovery set when P < 3.3 x 10(-6) and in the validation set when P < 0.001 in 2 of 3 algorithms. Results Twenty-five genes within 5 regions and 19 genes within 6 regions reached statistical significance in at least 2 of 3 algorithms in males and females, respectively. EGFR was significantly associated with all glioma and glioblastoma in males only and a female-specific association in TERT, all of which remained nominally significant after conditioning on known risk loci. There were nominal associations with the BioCarta telomeres pathway in both males and females. Conclusions These results provide additional evidence that there may be differences by sex in genetic risk for glioma. Additional analyses may further elucidate the biological processes through which this risk is conferred.

  • 38. Ostrom, Quinn
    et al.
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Chen, Yanwen
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wiencke, John
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Rice, Terri
    McCoy, Lucie
    Hansen, Helen
    Bondy, Melissa
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    SEX-SPECIFIC GENOME-WIDE ANALYSIS FOR LOCI ASSOCIATED WITH GLIOMA RISK2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 77-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Patel, Ami V
    et al.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Colbert, Melissa C
    Dasgupta, Biplab
    Ratner, Nancy
    Fatty acid synthase is a metabolic oncogene targetable in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors2015In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 17, no 12, p. 1599-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft tissue sarcomas with minimal therapeutic opportunities. We observed that lipid droplets (LDs) accumulate in human MPNST cell lines and in primary human tumor samples. The goal of this study was to investigate the relevance of lipid metabolism to MPNST survival and as a possible therapeutic target.

    METHODS: Based on preliminary findings that MPNSTs accumulate LDs, we hypothesized that a deregulated lipid metabolism supports MPNST cell survival/proliferation rate. To test this, we examined respiration, role of fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and the enzyme fatty acid synthase involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis in MPNSTs using both genetic and pharmacological tools.

    RESULTS: We demonstrate that LDs accumulate in MPNST cell lines, primary human and mouse MPNST tumors, and neural crest cells. LDs from MPNST cells disappear on lipid deprivation, indicating that LDs can be oxidized as a source of energy. Inhibition of FAO decreased oxygen consumption and reduced MPNST survival, indicating that MPNST cells likely metabolize LDs through active FAO. FAO inhibition reduced oxygen consumption and survival even in the absence of exogenous lipids, indicating that lipids synthesized de novo can also be oxidized. Consequently, inhibition of de novo fatty acid synthesis, which is overexpressed in human MPNST cell lines, effectively reduced MPNST survival and delayed induction of tumor growth in vivo.

    CONCLUSION: Our results show that MPNSTs depend on lipid metabolic pathways and suggest that disrupting lipid metabolism could be a potential new strategy for the development of MPNST therapeutics.

  • 40. Phillips, Heidi
    et al.
    Sandmann, Thomas
    Li, Congfen
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    Chinot, Olivier L.
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Mason, Warren
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Regional Cancer Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saran, Frank
    Lai, Albert
    Moore, Nicola
    Hegde, Priti
    Abrey, Lauren
    Bourgon, Richard
    Garcia, Josep
    Bais, Carlos
    Correlation of molecular subtypes with overall survival (OS) in AVAglio, a randomized, placebo-controlled study of bevacizumab (BEV) plus radiotherapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM)2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, no 5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Rosenlund, L.
    et al.
    Reg Canc Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Asklund, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Reg Canc Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Petersson, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Developing Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PRO) for Implementation in the Swedish National Quality Register for Primary Brain Tumors2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 2, p. Meeting Abstract: P15.14-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Praska, Corinne
    Kollmeyer, Thomas
    Yamada, Seiji
    Decker, Paul
    Kosel, Matthew
    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette
    Lachance, Daniel
    Bainbridge, Matthew
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    Jenkins, Robert
    MOLECULAR GROUPING OF TUMORS FROM PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL GLIOMA2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 76-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Ruiz, Vanessa Y.
    et al.
    Praska, Corinne E.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Kollmeyer, Thomas M.
    Yamada, Seiji
    Decker, Paul A.
    Kosel, Matthew L.
    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.
    Lachance, Daniel H.
    Bainbridge, Matthew N.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Molecular subtyping of tumors from patients with familial glioma2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 810-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Single-gene mutation syndromes account for some familial glioma (FG); however, they make up only a small fraction of glioma families. Gliomas can be classified into 3 major molecular subtypes based on isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q codeletion. We hypothesized that the prevalence of molecular subtypes might differ in familial versus sporadic gliomas and that tumors in the same family should have the same molecular subtype. Methods. Participants in the FG study (Gliogene) provided samples for germline DNA analysis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors were obtained from a subset of FG cases, and DNA was extracted. We analyzed tissue from 75 families, including 10 families containing a second affected family member. Copy number variation data were obtained using a first-generation Affymetrix molecular inversion probe (MIP) array. Results. Samples from 62 of 75 (83%) FG cases could be classified into the 3 subtypes. The prevalence of the molecular subtypes was: 30 (48%) IDH-wildtype, 21 (34%) IDH-mutant non-codeleted, and 11 (19%) IDH-mutant and 1p/19q codeleted. This distribution of molecular subtypes was not statistically different from that of sporadic gliomas (P = 0.54). Of 10 paired FG samples, molecular subtypes were concordant for 7 (kappa = 0.59): 3 IDH-mutant non-codeleted, 2 IDH-wildtype, and 2 IDH-mutant and 1p/19q codeleted gliomas. Conclusions. Our data suggest that within individual families, patients develop gliomas of the same molecular subtype. However, we did not observe differences in the prevalence of the molecular subtypes in FG compared with sporadic gliomas. These observations provide further insight into the distribution of molecular subtypes in FG.

  • 44. Saran, Frank
    et al.
    Chinot, Olivier L.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Mason, Warren
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    Dhar, Sunita
    Pozzi, Emanuela
    Garcia, Josep
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Bevacizumab, temozolomide, and radiotherapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma: comprehensive safety results during and after first-line therapy2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 991-1001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The proposed use of bevacizumab with radiotherapy/temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma raised potential safety concerns. Bevacizumab has been linked with stroke, bleeding events, and wound-healing complications in other tumor types; these events are of particular concern for glioblastoma (highly vascular tumors that are usually resected). Published data on the interaction of bevacizumab with radiotherapy/temozolomide are also limited. We report safety data from a phase III randomized trial (Avastin in Glioblastoma), focusing on these considerations. Methods. Eligible patients received: radiotherapy and temozolomide plus bevacizumab/placebo, 6 cycles; a 4-week treatment break; temozolomide plus bevacizumab/placebo, 6 cycles; and bevacizumab/placebo until progression. Data on adverse events (AEs) were collected throughout. Results. Bevacizumab-treated patients (n = 461) had a longer median safety follow-up time (12.3 vs 8.5 mo), and a higher proportion completed 6 cycles of maintenance temozolomide (64.6% vs 36.9%) versus placebo (n = 450). The incidences of relevant AEs (bevacizumab vs placebo, respectively) were: arterial thromboembolic events (5.9% vs 1.6%); cerebral hemorrhage (3.3% vs 2.0%); wound-healing complications (6.9% vs 4.7%); thrombocytopenia (34.1% vs 27.3%); radiotherapy-associated skin injury (8.2% vs 9.3%); alopecia (39.0% vs 36.0%); gastrointestinal perforation (including gastrointestinal abscesses and fistulae, 1.7% vs 0.4%); and radiotherapy-associated injury (0.4% vs 0.0%). Overall, 15.8% and 23.8% of bevacizumab-and placebo-treated patients had surgery (including biopsy) after progression. Within 30 days of postprogression surgery, AE incidence was 10.9% (bevacizumab) and 23.4% (placebo). Conclusion. The safety profile was consistent with that expected from radiotherapy/temozolomide plus bevacizumab. The increased AE incidence with bevacizumab did not impact patients' ability to receive standard-of-care treatment or to undergo further surgery.

  • 45. Saran, Frank
    et al.
    Chinot, Olivier L.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Reg Canc Ctr Stockholm,.
    Mason, Warren
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Dahr, Sunita
    Hilton, Magalie
    Garcia, Josep
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    SAFETY RESULTS FROM AVAglio, A PHASE III RANDOMIZED STUDY OF BEVACIZUMAB (BEV) PLUS STANDARD COMBINATION TEMOZOLOMIDE (TMZ) AND RADIOTHERAPY (RT) IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED GLIOBLASTOMA (GBM)2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 127-128Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Sjöström, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Liu, Yanhong
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Broholm, Helle
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Collatz-Laier, Helle
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Genetic variations in EGF and EGFR and glioblastoma outcome2010In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 815-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few prognostic factors have been associated with glioblastoma survival. We analyzed a complete tagging of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF receptor (EGFR) gene polymorphisms as potential prognostic factors. Thirty tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in EGF and 89 tagging SNPs in EGFR were analyzed for association with survival in 176 glioblastoma cases. Validation analyses were performed for 4 SNPs in a set of 638 glioblastoma patients recruited at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). Three hundred and seventy-four glioblastoma patients aged 50 years or older at diagnosis were subanalyzed to enrich for de novo arising glioblastoma. We found 7 SNPs in haplotype 4 in EGF that were associated with prognosis in glioblastoma patients. In EGFR, 4 of 89 SNPs were significantly associated with prognosis but judged as false positives. Four of the significantly associated EGF polymorphisms in haplotype block 4 were validated in a set from MDACC; however, none of the associations were clearly replicated. rs379644 had a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.19 (0.94-1.51) in the whole population with 18.6 months survival in the risk genotype compared with 24.5 in the reference category. As the median age differed slightly between the 2 study sets, the MDACC cases aged 50 or older at diagnosis were analyzed separately (rs379644, HR 1.32 [0.99-1.78]), which is marginally significant and partially validates our findings. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to perform a comprehensive tagging of the EGF and EGFR genes, and the data give some support that EGF polymorphisms might be associated with poor prognosis. Further confirmation in independent data sets of prospective studies is necessary to establish EGF as prognostic risk factor.

  • 47.
    Sjöström, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ghasimi, Soma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Broholm, H.
    Brannstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Johansen, C.
    Collatz-Laier, H.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    EGFR expression and glioblastoma outcome2012In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 14, no Suppl. 3, p. 19-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48. Sooman, L.
    et al.
    Ekman, S.
    Bergqvist, M.
    Gullbo, J.
    Bergstrom, S.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wu, X.
    Blomquist, E.
    Lennartsson, J.
    SHP1 EXPRESSION IS EPIGENETICALLY REGULATED AND INFLUENCES THE SENSITIVITY TO CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS IN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS2012In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 14, p. 18-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49. Taphoorn, Martin J. B.
    et al.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Reg Canc Ctr Stockholm.
    Bottomley, Andrew
    Cloughesy, Timothy
    Wick, Wolfgang
    Mason, Warren
    Saran, Frank
    Nishikawa, Ryo
    Ravelo, Arliene
    Hilton, Magalie
    Chinot, Olivier L.
    HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE (HRQOL) ANALYSES IN THE AVAGLIO STUDY, A RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED PHASE III TRIAL OF BEVACIZUMAB, TEMOZOLOMIDE AND RADIOTHERAPY IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED GLIOBLASTOMA2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 232-232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Tiemann, Katja
    et al.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Niclou, Simone P.
    ELUCIDATING THE MECHANISM OF RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITION BY SOLUBLE LRIG1 IN GLIOBLASTOMA2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 28-29Article in journal (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 54
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