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  • 1. Abbas, Sascha
    et al.
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Peeters, Petra H
    Engel, Pierre
    Brustad, Magritt
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buijsse, Brian
    Adarakis, George
    Ouranos, Vassilis
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Suárez, Marcial Vicente Argüelles
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87-1.32) and 1.02 (0.90-1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80-1.19) and 0.90 (0.79-1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (P(trend) = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (P(interaction) = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.

  • 2. Agborsangaya, Calypse
    et al.
    Toriola, Adetunji T
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Surcel, Heljia-Marja
    Holl, Katsiaryna
    Parkkila, Seppo
    Tuohimaa, Pentti
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Lehtinen, Matti
    The effects of storage time and sampling season on the stability of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and androstenedione2010In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the stability of serum samples stored in large biobanks is pivotal for reliable assessment of hormone-dependent disease risks. We studied the effects of sample storage time and season of serum sampling on the stability of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) and androstenedione in a stratified random sample of 402 women, using paired sera from the Finnish Maternity Cohort. Serum samples selected were donated between 6 and 24 yr ago. The storage time did not affect serum 25-OHD and androstenedione levels. However, there was a significant mean difference in the 25-OHD levels of sera withdrawn during winter (first sample) vs. during summer (second sample; -18.4 nmol/l, P ≤ 0.001). Also at the individual level, there were significant differences in average 25-OHD levels between individuals with the paired sera taken at winter–winter compared with other alternatives (summer–winter, winter–summer, and summer–summer). The androstenedione levels showed no such differences. Long-term storage does not affect serum 25-OHD and androstenedione levels, but sampling season is an important determinant of 25-OHD levels. Stored serum samples can be used to study disease associations with both hormones. However, sampling season needs to be taken into account for 25-OHD by considering matching and stratification and, if possible, serial sampling.

  • 3. Chajès, Véronique
    et al.
    Biessy, Carine
    Byrnes, Graham
    Deharveng, Geneviève
    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra
    Jenab, Mazda
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Ocké, Marga
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Jakszyn, Paula
    González, Carlos A
    Huerta, Jose-Maria
    Martinez, Carmen
    Amiano, Pilar
    Suárez, Laudina Rodriguez
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Overvad, Kim
    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre
    Berrino, Franco
    Pala, Valeria
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Spencer, Elisabeth A
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Boeing, Heiner
    Nöethlings, Ute
    Olsen, Karina Standahl
    Skeie, Guri
    Lund, Eiliv
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Zilis, Dimosthenis
    Oustoglou, Erifili
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Riboli, Elio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Ecological-level associations between highly processed food intakes and plasma phospholipid elaidic acid concentrations: results from a cross-sectional study within the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC).2011In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 63, no 8, p. 1235-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elaidic acid is the main unnatural trans fatty acid isomer occurring during partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils used as ingredients for the formulation of processed foods. The main objective is to assess associations between processed food intakes and plasma phospholipid elaidic acid concentrations within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. A cross-sectional study was used to determine fatty acid profiles in 3,003 subjects from 16 centers. Single 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR) were collected using a standardized computerized interview program. Food intakes were computed according to their degree of processing (moderately/nonprocessed foods, processed staple foods, highly processed foods). Adjusted ecological and individual correlations were calculated between processed food intakes and plasma elaidic acid levels. At the population level, mean intakes of highly processed foods were strongly correlated with mean levels of plasma elaidic acid in men (P = 0.0016) and in women (P = 0.0012). At the individual level, these associations remained but at a much lower level in men (r = 0.08, P = 0.006) and in women (r = 0.09, P = 0.0001). The use of an averaged 24-HDR measure of highly processed food intakes is adequate for predicting mean levels of plasma elaidic acid among European populations.

  • 4.
    Einarsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Laurell, Göran
    Tiblom Ehrsson, Ylva
    An explorative study on energy balance in patients with head and neck cancer2019In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Involuntary body weight loss in head and neck cancer is common. Fundamental for weight loss is an energy imbalance where total energy expenditure exceeds energy intake.

    Aim: To map energy intake and parameters of energy expenditure at the start of and after radiotherapy, and their relation to weight change, body mass index, and immune markers in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Materials and Methods: Data from 20 patients on energy intake (24-hour dietary intake recalls), total energy expenditure (SenseWear Armband Pro3), resting energy expenditure (indirect calorimetry), body weight, body mass index, and immune markers in serum (C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6) were collected at the start of and after radiotherapy (median 8 mo, range 5–13).

    Results: No statistical significance was shown between the two measurement points for energy intake or for the different parameters of energy expenditure. Median values for energy balance were 0.93 and 0.96 for the start of treatment and follow-up, respectively. Twelve and 13 patients had a negative energy balance at the start of radiotherapy and at follow-up, respectively.

    Conclusion: A negative energy balance was seen for the majority of patients, which stresses the importance of nutritional treatment at the start of and after radiotherapy.

  • 5.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population2019In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of dairy products in cancer is unclear. We assessed consumption of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter, estimated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, in relation to prospective risk of breast, prostate, colorectal, smoking-, and obesity-related cancers in 101,235 subjects, including 12,552 cancer cases, in the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Most analyses (n = 20) rendered null results. In men, we observed an increased prostate cancer risk among high-consumers of cheese (hazard ratio (HR) for highest vs. lowest quintile (Q5-Q1), 1.11; 95% CI, 0.97-1.27; Ptrend = 0.013). In women, high-consumers of cheese had a decreased risk of overall cancer (HR Q5-Q1, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.04; Ptrend = 0.039), smoking-related (HR Q5-Q1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; Ptrend ≤ 0.001), and colorectal cancers (HR Q5-Q1, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.63-1.07; Ptrend = 0.048). Butter yielded a weak decreased obesity-related cancer risk in women (HR Q5-Q1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81-1.02; Ptrend = 0.049). Fermented milk yielded HRs below zero in women, but with no clear linear associations. In conclusion, this study does not support any major adverse or beneficial effects of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter in the diet from a cancer risk perspective.

  • 6.
    Skeie, Guri
    et al.
    Universitetet i Tromsö.
    Braaten, Tonje
    Olsen, Anja
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Lund, Eiliv
    Whole Grain Intake and Survival Among Scandinavian Colorectal Cancer Patients2014In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To our knowledge, no studies of associations between intake of whole grain (WHG) and survival of colorectal cancer have been published, despite evidence that dietary fiber, and to some extent WHG, are associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. Scandinavia is an area where the WHG consumption traditionally is high. We performed a case-only (N = 1119) study in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort of pre-diagnosis WHG intake (total WHG, WHG wheat, WHG rye, and WHG oats) and survival of colorectal cancer. Cox regression analyses were used to study the associations, both in categorical and continuous models, stratified by location (proximal, distal, rectum) and country. No evidence of an association was found, neither for total WHG intake (hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-1.97 lowest vs. highest tertile, adjusted for age at diagnosis, metastasis status, smoking, folate, margarine, and energy), nor for specific grains. Prediagnosis consumption of WHG does not seem to improve survival of colorectal cancer in subjects diagnosed within this prospective population-based Scandinavian cohort.

  • 7. Wikström, Pernilla
    et al.
    Bylund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Zhang, Jie-Xian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Stattin, Pär
    Bergh, Anders
    Epithelial cell apoptosis and decreases epithelial cell volume in TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate)2005In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 111-116Article in journal (Refereed)
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