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  • 1.
    Deyessa Kabeta, Negussie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Berhane, Y
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ellsberg, MC
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Joint effect of maternal depression and intimate partner violence on increased risk of child death in rural Ethiopia2010In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 95, no 10, p. 771-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An awareness of the devastating consequences on child survival in low income setting of violence against women and depression is needed among public health workers as well as clinicians, for both community and clinical interventions.

  • 2. Lynøe, Niels
    et al.
    Elinder, Göran
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Rosén, Måns
    Sundgren, Pia
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Easier to see the speck in your critical peers' eyes than the log in your own? Response to Debelle et al.2018In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 103, no 7, p. 714-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Namatovu, Fredinah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Season and region of birth as risk factors for coeliac disease a key to the aetiology?2016In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 101, no 12, p. 1114-1118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease (CD) incidence has increased in recent decades, characterised by variations according to sex, age at diagnosis, year of birth, month of birth and region of birth. Genetic susceptibility and exposure to gluten are the necessary factors in CD aetiology, although several environmental factors are considered.

    METHODS: A nationwide prospective cohort longitudinal study was conducted consisting of 1 912 204 children aged 0-14.9 years born in Sweden from 1991 to 2009. A total of 6569 children were diagnosed with biopsy-verified CD from 47 paediatric departments. Using Cox regression, we examined the association between CD diagnosis and season of birth, region of birth and year of birth.

    RESULTS: Overall, CD risk was higher for children born during spring, summer and autumn as compared with children born during winter: adjusted HR for spring 1.08 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.16), summer 1.10 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.18) and autumn 1.10 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.18). Increased CD risk was highest if born in the south, followed by central Sweden when compared with children born in northern Sweden. Children diagnosed at <2 years had an increased CD risk if born in spring while those diagnosed at 2-14.9 years the risk was increased for summer and autumn births. The birth cohort of 1991-1996 had increased CD risk if born during spring, for the 1997-2002 birth cohort the risk increased for summer and autumn births, while for the birth cohort of 2003-2009 the risk was increased if born during autumn.

    CONCLUSIONS: Season of birth and region of birth are independently and jointly associated with increased risk of developing CD during the first 15 years of life. Seasonal variation in infectious load is the likely explanation.

  • 4.
    Namatovu, Fredinah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study2018In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 143-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Coeliac disease might affect school performance due to its effect on cognitive performance and related health consequences that might increase school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with coeliac disease performed differently on completion of ninth grade in school compared with children without coeliac disease.

    Methods: Analysis was performed on a population of 445 669 children born in Sweden between 1991 and 1994 of whom 1767 were diagnosed with coeliac disease. School performance at ninth grade was the outcome and coeliac disease was the exposure. Other covariates included sex, Apgar score at 5 min, small for gestational age, year of birth, family type, parental education and income.

    Results: There was no association between coeliac disease and school performance at ninth grade (adjusted coefficient -2.4, 95% CI 5.1 to 0.4). A weak association was established between late coeliac diagnosis and higher grades, but this disappeared after adjusting for parent socioeconomic conditions. Being small for gestational age affected performance negatively (adjusted coefficient -6.9, 95% CI 8.0 to 5.7). Grade scores were significantly lower in children living with a single parent (adjusted coefficient -20.6, 95% CI 20.9 to 20.2), compared with those with married/cohabiting parents. A positive association was found between scores at ninth grade and parental education and income.

    Conclusion: Coeliac disease diagnosis during childhood is not associated with poor school performance at ninth grade.

  • 5. Skovbjerg, S
    et al.
    Roos, K
    Holm, Stig
    Grahn Håkansson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Nowrouzian, F
    Ivarsson, M
    Adlerberth, I
    Wold, AE
    Spray bacteriotherapy decreases middle ear fluid in children with secretory otitis media2009In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 92-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows that spray treatment with S sanguinis may be effective against SOM. The mechanism for the effect remains to be investigated.

  • 6.
    Videholm, Samuel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Unit of Research, Development, and Education, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Silfverdal, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Reniers, Georges
    Maternal weight and infections in early childhood: a cohort study2019In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine this association between maternal weight during pregnancy and the incidence of hospitalisations for infectious diseases during early childhood. Design A population-based cohort study. Setting A national cohort was created by combining data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the National Inpatient Register, the Cause of Death Register, the Total Population Register and the Longitudinal integration database for health insurance and labour market studies. Patients 693 007 children born in Sweden between 1998 and 2006. Main outcome measures Number of hospitalisations for infectious diseases during the first 5 years of life, overall and for categories of infectious diseases (lower respiratory, enteric, upper respiratory, genitourinary, perinatal, skin and soft tissue, neurological and eye, digestive tract, bloodstream and other infections). Results Overweight (body mass index (BMI) 25.0-29.9) and obesity (BMI >= 30) during pregnancy were associated with a higher overall incidence of hospitalisations for infectious diseases, adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.05 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.06) and adjusted IRR 1.18 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.21). Overweight and obesity during pregnancy were strongly associated with perinatal infections, adjusted IRR 1.34 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.44) and adjusted IRR 1.72 (95% CI 1.57 to 1.88). In contrast, we found no association between maternal weight during pregnancy and infections of skin and soft tissue, the nervous system, the digestive tract or the bloodstream. Conclusions We observed an association between overweight and obesity during pregnancy, and hospitalisations for infectious diseases during early childhood.

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