Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Hedman, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    How people with Alzheimer's disease express their sense of self: analysis using Rom Harre's theory of selfhood2013In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 713-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to use Harré's social constructionist theory of selfhood to describe how people with mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) express their sense of self. The findings show that Self 1, the embodied sense of being a person, was expressed fluently by participants through the use of first-person indexicals. Self 2, the experienced personal attributes and life narrative, had undergone changes. Those changes were not entirely for the worse; participants had also developed new skills in managing life with AD. In a lifetime perspective, those changes were minor and participants perceived themselves to be basically the same people that they were before having AD. When constructing Self 3, the social personae, participants usually described being supported by others, but sometimes described being exposed to malignant positioning. They also feared that they might become more exposed to negative attitudes as their AD progressed. However, participants were understanding towards the offensive behaviours of others.

  • 2. Hedman, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University, Sweden; The Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Agency and communion in people with Alzheimer’s disease, as described by themselves and their spousal carers2019In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agency (individuality) and communion (togetherness) are vital to a positive sense of self. People with Alzheimer’s disease are at risk of experiencing diminished agency and decreased communion. Their family members’, especially their partner’s, view on their agency and communion is also likely to influence their sense of agency, communion, and self. In the present study, individual interviews with 10 people with Alzheimer’s disease and their spousal carers were qualitatively analysed to describe how in each couple the two spouses viewed the agency and communion of the person with Alzheimer’s disease from an individual perspective. The findings show that the carers generally described the agency of the person with Alzheimer’s disease as slightly weaker compared with the persons with Alzheimer’s disease themselves. The carers also appeared to have poor knowledge of what supported and threatened the sense of communion of the person with Alzheimer’s disease.

  • 3.
    Langø Kristiansen, Per Jørgen
    et al.
    The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Normann, Hans K
    The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Fjelltun, Aud-Mari
    Tromsø, Norway.
    Skaalvik, Mari W
    The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    How do people in the early stage of Alzheimer's disease see their future?2017In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 145-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people fear Alzheimer's disease. Central to the fear of the disease is the dread of the loss of identity or self. The aim of this study is to investigate the thoughts people in an early stage of Alzheimer's disease have about their future selves, and the consequences these thoughts have for their temporary lives. The concepts of future and self are understood in terms of the concepts 'possible selves' and 'selfhood'. The participants in the study are two men in their early 60 s. The data consist of four individual interviews and 11 facilitated family conversations including two of their next of kin. The data were collected over a two-year period. The data were interpreted using a hermeneutic analysis inspired by Gadamer. The main findings were the efforts made by the participants to live in the present and their worries about a future as 'living dead'.

  • 4.
    Norberg, Astrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. The Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    The Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Moments of homecoming among people with advanced dementia disease in a residential care facility2017In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 629-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns moments of homecoming among people with advanced dementia disease living in a residential care facility. Our main finding from participant observations with nine residents was that the residents showed moments of homecoming, i.e. they alternated between verbal and/or nonverbal expressions of feeling at home and of not feeling at home. If care providers understand that they can help people with advanced dementia disease experience moments of homecoming, they can focus on aspects of care that can promote these experiences.

  • 5. Sandberg, Linda
    et al.
    Rosenberg, Lena
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Borell, Lena
    Risks in situations that are experienced as unfamiliar and confusing: the perspective of persons with dementia2017In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 471-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of people with dementia are ageing at home in Sweden and in other countries. In order to meet the safety requirements, knowledge about how persons with dementia experience risks is required. The aim of the study was to explore and better understand how persons with dementia, living at home, experience risks in their daily life and how they handle these situations. Twelve persons with dementia were interviewed using open-ended questions, and the data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. Findings showed that participants experienced situations fraught with risks in their daily life as unfamiliar and confusing. Previously familiar places became unfamiliar to them, and details did not come together. They were uncertain about what actually had happened. How the participants handled these situations in order to reduce the risks are described.

  • 6. Skaalvik, Mari Wolff
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health Care Sciences, Centre of Care Research, University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe, Norway.
    Normann, Ketil
    Fjelltun, Aud-Mari
    Asplund, Kenneth
    The experience of self and threats to sense of self among relatives caring for people with Alzheimer's disease2016In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 467-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored how the relatives of people with Alzheimer's disease expressed Self 2 and Self 3 according to Harré's social constructionist theory of selfhood. Having a relative with Alzheimer's disease affects one's life. In this study, we concentrated on how close relatives of people with Alzheimer's disease experienced their sense of self. This study was descriptive and qualitative. Interviews were conducted with 20 relatives of 10 people with Alzheimer's disease from 2009 to 2011. The data were analysed according to Harré's social constructionist theory of selfhood including Selves 2 and 3. Participants reported that Alzheimer's disease challenged their personal attributes, relations and positioning. Understanding how Alzheimer's disease affects the sense of self among close relatives is important, as this knowledge is pivotal for supporting these relatives who are often informal caregivers in ways that enable a fulfilling and meaningful life.

  • 7. Söderlund, Mona
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Implementation of the validation method: nurses’ descriptions of caring relationships with residents with dementia disease2012In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 569-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes nurses’ experiences of relationships with residents with dementia disease (1) before and after validation method (VM) training and (2) after extensive experience using the VM. An intervention was performed in a nursing home, involving supervision plus one year of training in using the VM. Nurses were interviewed before and after the intervention. Nurses with extensive VM experience, working at another nursing home, were interviewed once. Qualitative content analysis of the transcribed interviews revealed four themes with sub-themes. Most nurses participating in the intervention described a changed approach afterwards, focusing more on residents and on their communications, which in turn seemed to lead to closer, more trusting relationships. A similar approach was described by the nurses with extensive VM experience. One conclusion is that supervised VM training facilitated nurses’ development of communication skills and abilities to establish close relationships with residents. Some nurses described the VM as demanding.

  • 8. Wikström, Sofia
    et al.
    Josephsson, Staffan
    Stigsdotter-Neely, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nygård, Louise
    Engagement in activities: Experiences of persons with dementia and their caregiving spouses2008In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 251-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study identifies how persons with dementia and their caregiving spouses individually perceive their own, their spouse's and their mutual engagements in everyday activities. Fifty-two cohabiting spouses, half of whom were diagnosed with dementia, were interviewed. A qualitative constant comparative analysis was performed, identifying four major themes: perceived changes in activity engagements; consequences of experienced changes; dilemmas experienced by the caregivers; and management approaches to handle a changed everyday life. Each individual described their activities to include loss of social engagements and changes in the relationship. Dilemmas experienced by the caregivers included `interfering with the spouse's engagement or not' and `placing the spouse's or one's own needs first'. The caregiver management approaches identified included `taking over' or `encouraging initiative'; `lowering demands or avoiding problematic engagements'; and `managing through collaboration'. Findings provide insight into everyday engagements for persons with dementia and their caregivers, important to healthcare support providers.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf