umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 46 of 46
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Almehed, K
    et al.
    Carlsten, H
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Health-related quality of life in systemic lupus erythematosus and its association with disease and work disability.2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 39, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its relationship to disease variables, vertebral fractures, and employment status in female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    METHODS: HRQOL was assessed with the Swedish version of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36) in female patients (n=163) and in age- and sex-matched controls (n=1045). Associations between the SF-36 score and demographics, disease variables, prevalent vertebral fractures, and employment status were analysed.

    RESULTS: The SLE patients, aged 20 to 82 years, scored significantly lower than the controls on all SF-36 subscales. Patients with vertebral fractures were older, had greater disease damage, and lower physical functioning (PF) than patients without fractures. Of the SLE patients of working age (n=142), 54% worked full or part time. These patients scored their HRQOL significantly higher (better) than patients not working. Being able to work was significantly associated with low age and high scores in PF and role physical (RP): the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for these variables was 0.82, confidence interval 0.75-0.89.

    CONCLUSIONS: HRQOL is substantially lower in SLE than in the general population but working ability indicates better health. We encourage further research regarding the effects on HRQOL by preventive actions taken against work disability in SLE.

  • 2. Andersen, M.
    et al.
    Olesen, M. K.
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Andersen, G. N.
    Vendsyssel Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Rheumatol Unit, Hjorring, Denmark.
    Adalimumab (Humira (R)) normalizes melanocortin receptor subtype 2, 3, and 4 expression in CD8+, CD14+, and CD19+leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127, p. 25-26 Meeting Abstr. PP119Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Askling, Johan
    Bertilsson, Lennart
    Coster, Lars
    Feltelius, Nils
    Fored, Michael
    Geborek, Pierre
    Jacobsson, Lennart T.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Lindblad, Staffan
    Lysholm, Jorgen
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Saxne, Tore
    van Vollenhoven, Ronald
    The Swedish biologics register (ARTIS): observations of adverse events when using biologics in clinical practice2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bengtsson, C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Wahlin, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Braune, A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Jonsson, E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Hydroxychloroquine improves the blood lipid profile in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus after four and eight weeks of treatment: a randomized interventional study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 29-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Berglin, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Kokkonen, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Einarsdottir, E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ågren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Influence of female hormonal factors, in relation to autoantibodies and genetic markers, on the development of rheumatoid arthritis in northern Sweden: a case-control study2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 454-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longer duration of breastfeeding increased the risk of developing RA, especially among individuals seropositive for ACPA or IgM-RF or carrying the PTPN22 1858T variant. Use of OC for ≥ 7 years was associated with a decreased risk.

  • 6.
    Berglin, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Comparison of the 1987 ACR and 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: a prospective cohort study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare application of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and 2010 ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) classification criteria for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice. Method: The medical records of patients with early arthritis attending the Rheumatology Department, Umea University Hospital (n = 1026) were analysed. Patients with synovitis in at least one joint, no diagnosis other than RA being better for explaining the synovitis, and duration of symptoms less than 1 year at first visit, and at least 1 year of follow-up were included consecutively. Fulfilment of the 1987 and 2010 criteria at baseline was evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity for each criterion set, where estimated by using the outcome measures: initiation of methotrexate (MTX) therapy during the first year, and a clinical diagnosis of RA at the 1-year follow-up. Radiographs of hands and feet were evaluated using the Larsen score. Results: The study included 313 patients, of whom 56% fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria, 74% the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria, and 53% both sets of criteria at baseline. The sensitivity/specificity for the 1987 and 2010 criteria with MTX within the first year as the outcome measure was 0.68/0.79 and 0.84/0.54, respectively, and with a diagnosis of RA at follow-up 0.72/0.83 and 0.91/0.65, respectively. Older patients (i.e. >= 60 years) more often fulfilled the 2010 criteria. Patients who fulfilled the 2010 ACR/EULAR but not the 1987 ACR criteria had a lower Larsen score at inclusion and after 2 years. Conclusions: Compared with the 1987 ACR criteria, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria have higher sensitivity but lower specificity, especially in patients aged >= 60 years. The 1987 ACR criteria are suggested to predict a more erosive disease.

  • 7. Bertilsson, L
    et al.
    Andersson-Gäre, B
    Fasth, A
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg.
    A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 41, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate, in a population-based cohort of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), onset characteristics, progression, outcome, and prognostic factors longitudinally for 5 years.

    METHODS: This cohort consisted of 132 incidence cases identified between 1984 and 1986 in southwestern Sweden followed for 5 years with annual reports of subgroup, joint assessment, disease activity, eye examinations, laboratory measurements, and medication. At the 5-year follow-up, the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (Child-HAQ) was evaluated. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria for diagnosis and disease activity were used.

    RESULTS: During the 5 years only four patients were lost to follow-up, 34% changed subgroup and 8% developed uveitis. At the 5-year follow-up the disease was active in 12% of the patients, stable in 28%, inactive in 25%, and in remission in 34%. Among those examined, 24% had radiological changes, of whom half had advanced changes. The Child-HAQ median score at the 5-year follow-up was 0.13 (range 0.0-1.9). The number of involved joints at inclusion correlated positively with active disease at the 5-year follow-up. Age at disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis correlated positively with continuous disease and Child-HAQ score. CONCLUSION. Our study shows a diverse disease course during the first 5 years of JCA where one-third changed subgroup and two-thirds did not reach remission. Age of disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis at inclusion were associated with poor outcome at the 5-year follow-up.

  • 8. Bjelle, A
    et al.
    Cedergren, B
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    HLA B27 in the population of northern Sweden1982In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 11, p. 23-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bjorsenius, I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Södergren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Increased progression of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is partially reflected by disease severity at the time of diagnosis: 11-year prospective follow-up2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Brink, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johansson, L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nygren, E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Arlestig, L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Vitamin D in individuals before onset of rheumatoid arthritis: relation to vitamin D binding protein and its associated genetic variants2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 23-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Brink, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Verheul, M. K.
    Ronnelid, J.
    Holmdahl, R.
    Toes, R. E. M.
    Klareskog, L.
    Trouw, L. A.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The presence of anti-carbamylated protein antibodies prior to onset of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with radiological progression in early RA2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127, Meeting Abstract: PP109, p. 21-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Genetic-markers in rheumatoid-arthritis1986In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 15, no Suppl. 58, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Bjelle, A
    Frequency of HLA-B 27 in rheumatic diseases in northern Sweden1978In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Bjelle, A
    Nordmark, L
    HLA B27 and involvement in sacro-iliac joints in patients with rheumatiod-arthritis1982In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Mjörndal, Tom
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Acetylator phenotypes in rheumatoid-arthritis patients with or without adverse drug-reactions to sodium-aurothiomalate or d-penicillamine1987In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 235-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acetylator phenotype was determined in 59 patients with classical, seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with sodium-aurothiomalate or d-penicillamine. Patients with adverse drug reactions (ADR) leading to drug withdrawal (n=29) were compared with a group of patients without ADR (n=30). The frequency of slow acetylators was significantly (p< 0.05) increased in all RA patients, irrespective of the presence of ADR, particularly in the male patients, compared with a control population. No association was found between acetylator phenotype and clinical data or secondary Sjögrens's syndrome (SS).

  • 16.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ström, Håkan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Danderyd University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bjelle, Anders
    Department of Rheumatology, Sahlgren University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Möller, Erna
    Department of Clinical Immunology, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
    Clinical symptoms and HLA antigens in a family with reiters disease1985In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 149-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clinical and immunogenetic study was performed on a three-generation family with Reiter's disease (RD). Twelve of 56 members of the family (33 clinically examined) including one in-law, had symptoms of arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, uveitis, and/or mucocutaneous manifestations, but only one had the complete triad of Reiter's syndrome (RS). Radiographic sacro-iliitis was found in 7 individuals, and monoarticular onset was reported in 5 out of 7 with peripheral arthritis. HLA B27 was found in 26 of the 37 family members who were tissue typed (including one in-law). All individuals with RD were B27-positive. Seven different B27 phenotypes were identified. This finding suggests that RD is associated with the B27 antigen itself, and not to a gene closely linked to B27. From a pedigree analysis of this family an autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or multifactorial inheritance seemed the most probable alternatives. The family history is a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of RD.

  • 17.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ström, Håkan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm.
    Bjelle, Anders
    Department of Rheumatology, Sahlgren University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Möller, Erna
    Department of Clinical Immunology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm.
    HLA antigens in rheumatoid-arthritis patients with and without a family history of polyarthritis1985In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 375-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The HLA antigens, A, B and DR, were studied in 141 patients with erosive, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The frequency of the B27 antigen was significantly increased among patients with a family history of symmetrical polyarthritis compared with blood donor controls (p<0.001) and with patients without a family history of polyarthritis (p<0.005). The frequency of DR4 was significantly (p<0.001) increased among the RA patients, but there was no significant association between DR4 and a family history of polyarthritis.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Sundqvist, KG
    Changes in chemokines and their receptors in blood during treatment with the TNF inhibitor infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 260-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Chemokines are involved in leucocyte recruitment into inflammatory sites, such as the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The release of certain chemokines is augmented by pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF that blocks the biological effects of TNF, is used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. The effect of blocking TNF activity on chemokines is not fully understood.

    Aim. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects on chemokines and their receptors on peripheral mononuclear cells of anti-TNF treatment in RA-patients.

    Material and methods. Twelve patients with established RA who began treatment with infliximab, and nine patients with early RA treated with traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, were followed clinically for 30 weeks and chemokine levels in blood samples and chemokine receptor expression on the surface of T-cells and monocytes analysed. Three SLE-patients, as a small control group of another inflammatory disease, and nine healthy subjects were also included in the study.

    Result. CXCL10/IP-10 was significantly higher in RA-patients compared with healthy controls and decreased significantly two weeks after infliximab infusion. CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β decreased significantly after infliximab treatment although the concentrations were not significantly elevated at baseline compared with controls. There was an inverse correlation between the chemokine cleaving molecule dipeptidyl peptidase-IV/CD26 and CCL5/RANTES. Several chemokine receptors on T-cells were elevated in RA patients at inclusion into the study. The CCR2 expression on T-cells decreased significantly after infliximab treatment.

    Conclusion. The chemokines CXCL10/IP-10, CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β, mainly targeting the Th1 immune response, decreased after treatment with anti-TNF suggesting a more pronounced effect onTh1 activity than on the Th2 mediated response. Several chemokine receptors on blood T-cells were elevated in RA-patients, suggesting that they may be involved in the recruitment of T-lymphocytes from the blood to affected tissues.

  • 19.
    Forsblad d'Elia, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Rehnberg, E
    Kvist, G
    Ericsson, A
    Konttinen, Yt
    Mannerkorpi, K
    Fatigue and blood pressure in primary Sjogren's syndrome2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 284-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by fatigue. Little is known about the genesis of fatigue. Fatigue is thought to represent a multidimensional concept and it is important to be able to measure it confidently. The aims were to evaluate the reliability and validity of the 20-item Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) in SS and to search for factors associated with this disabling symptom.

    METHODS: Forty-eight women with primary SS completed the MFI-20 questionnaire. The results were compared with age-matched women with fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy controls. Convergent construct validity was assessed by correlations to a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for global fatigue by Spearman's correlation (r(s)). Test-retest reliability was analysed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) in 28 women. Associations between clinical variables and subscales of the MFI-20 were analysed.

    RESULTS: The SS women scored significantly higher in all subscales of the MFI-20 compared to controls but similar to FM. The ICCs were satisfactory, ranging from 0.66 for general fatigue to 0.85 for the total score of MFI-20. All subscales correlated significantly to VAS for global fatigue, general fatigue showing the highest correlation (r(s) = 0.70). The estimated number of hours of sleep/day was significantly associated with many of the fatigue dimensions. All five subscales of the MFI-20 were inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure (BP) and two with systolic BP.

    CONCLUSIONS: The MFI-20 was found to be a reliable and valid tool for the measurement of fatigue in primary SS. High levels of fatigue were correlated with low BP, suggesting an associated involvement of the autonomic nervous system.

  • 20.
    Hellman, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Engström-Laurent, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Larsson, Anders
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Hyaluronan concentration and molecular mass in psoriatic arthritis: biomarkers of disease severity, resistance to treatment, and outcome2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Low molecular mass hyaluronan causes inflammatory processes and can act as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in skin and other sites of activity in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This study investigated whether the molecular mass distribution of hyaluronan (HA) in skin and the quantity of circulating HA are related to the clinical inflammatory picture in PsA with active disease and to the effect of treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) adalimumab.

    Methods: Twenty patients with TNF-α-naïve active polyarticular PsA were included in this prospective clinical trial of treatment with 40 mg s.c. adalimumab according to standard procedure. Clinical activity, patients’ assessments, and skin biopsies were captured at inclusion and at the 12 week follow-up. Ten healthy individuals were recruited for comparison of HA analyses. Histochemistry of skin inflammation, serum HA, and molecular mass of HA were determined.

    Results: Overall improvements in clinical parameters were observed. Eight of 18 patients reached minimum disease activity after 12 weeks and disease activity was significantly reduced (p < 0.0001). Patients with elevated serum HA values were significantly older, had later onset of arthritis and more deformed joints, still had swollen joints after treatment, and had more circulating inflammatory biomarkers. More severe disease pathology showed a wide spectrum of high-molecular-mass HA accompanied by low mass HA. The treatment appears partly to normalize the HA mass distribution.

    Conclusion: HA concentration and mass seem to be two possible factors in the inflammatory pathology of PsA acting as biomarkers for disease severity, resistance to treatment, and worse outcome.

  • 21.
    Hofstedt, Oscar E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Di Giuseppe, D.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Stattin, N.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Ljung, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Comparison of agreement between internet-based registration of patient-reported outcomes and clinic-based paper forms within the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 326-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register has implemented an internet-based method (PER) for registering patient-recorded outcome measures. The aim of this study was to compare the agreement between visual analogue scales (VASs) reported via PER and clinic-based reporting using paper forms.Methods: In a cross-sectional study (70 patients), the results of 79 registrations of VASs for global health, pain, and fatigue from PER were compared with corresponding clinic-based paper registrations. For patients with polyarthritis, 28-joint count Disease Activity Scores (DAS28) were computed. Patients with axial disease also completed Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Functional Index (BASDAI and BASFI) questionnaires. Mean differences and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated. Agreement was visualized using Bland-Altman plots.Results: No statistically significant differences in VASs were found comparing PER and paper forms for VAS Global, VAS Pain, and VAS Fatigue (p=0.295, 0.463, and 0.288, respectively). ICCs for VAS Global, Pain, and Fatigue ranged from 0.889 to 0.952, indicating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman plots for VAS did not show any proportional bias. The mean difference for DAS28 calculated by VASs from paper vs PER was -0.02 (n=65, p =0.660), and the mean difference for BASDAI was 0.04 (n=11, p =0.742). ICCs for DAS28 and BASDAI were 0.962 and 0.985, respectively. Of the participating patients, 60% preferred PER.Conclusion: Internet-based reporting for patient-reported outcomes in a clinical setting resulted in similar data for VASs and corresponding disease activity scores to clinic-based reporting on paper forms.

  • 22. Holmqvist, M.
    et al.
    Ljung, Lotta
    Umeå University.
    Askling, J.
    Has the improved management of newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lowered the excess risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS)?2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 45, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hörnberg, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Pomeroy, J.
    Sandberg, C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Södergren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Ångström, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sundström, B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis: relationship to cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical atherosclerosis, and disease activity2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate associations between physical activity and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), subclinical atherosclerosis, and disease activity in patients with early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    Method: This cross-sectional study included 84 patients with early and 37 with long-standing RA (disease duration, mean ± sd: 1.4 ± 0.4 and 16.3 ± 2.3 years, respectively). Physical activity was measured using a combined accelerometer and heart-rate monitor. Further assessments were disease activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints), functional ability (Health Assessment Questionnaire), risk factors for CVD (blood lipids, i.e. triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein; blood glucose, blood pressure, sleeping heart rate, waist circumference, body mass index, and body fat), and subclinical atherosclerosis (pulse-wave velocity, augmentation index, and carotid intima–media thickness).

    Results: Physical activity variables did not differ between patients with early and long-standing RA. However, 37% of the patients with early and 43% of those with long-standing RA did not reach the World Health Organization’s recommended levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). In a final multiple regression model, adjusted for age, gender, disease duration, and activity monitor wear time, higher total physical activity was associated with lower body fat and higher functional ability. With the same adjustments, more time spent in MVPA was associated with lower high-density lipoprotein and lower sleeping heart rate.

    Conclusions: Physical activity was associated with more favourable risk factors for CVD. However, many patients were physically inactive, stressing the importance of promoting physical activity in RA.

  • 24. Imgenberg-Kreuz, J.
    et al.
    Leonard, D.
    Almlof, J. Carlsson
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Bengtsson, A.
    Jonsen, A.
    Padyukov, L.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Svenungsson, E.
    Sjowall, C.
    Syvanen, A.
    Ronnblom, L.
    Nordmark, G.
    Sandling, J.
    Shared and unique patterns of DNA methylation in primary Sjogren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 3-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Isaksson, J.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Södergren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Screening and simple counselling affect traditional cardiovascular risk factors in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127 Meeting Abstract PP234, p. 76-76Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and increased mortality in CVD. The cause of this increase has not been completely established, but chronic inflammation is thought to play a role. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors also appear to be important and may be potentiated by this inflammation. The Swedish Society for Rheumatology (SRF) has developed a set of guidelines for screening and primary prevention of CVD in patients with RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate these guidelines in a clinical setting.

    Method: Forty-seven patients newly diagnosed with RA during 2012 at the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital of Umeå were recruited. Three months after initial diagnosis of RA, patients were examined physically and blood samples were collected with regard to traditional cardiovascular risk factors according to the guidelines from the SRF. Tests of cardiorespiratory fitness were also performed. Additionally, patients received simple counselling regarding matters of diet, tobacco use and exercise from a nurse and a physiotherapist, respectively. The counselling session, based upon national guidelines from the National Food Agency and the Public Health Agency, was performed once per patient and lasted for approximately 45 minutes. A follow-up was performed 9 months after the first examination. This intervention was integrated into the clinic’s pre-existing early RA follow-up programme. The results were adjusted for disease activity and disability.

    Results: Among the 47 included patients, 45 reached the 9-month follow-up. Two were excluded because of delayed follow-up. Mean diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly from 80 to 77 mmHg (p < 0.05). Mean S-cholesterol decreased significantly from 5.5 to 5.2 mmol/L (p < 0.05). Mean ApoA1/ApoB decreased significantly from 0.73 to 0.65 (p < 0.05). In all the remaining variables (waist circumference, BMI, systolic blood pressure, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, FP-glucose), a clear decreasing trend could be observed (p > 0.05). Aerobic capacity according to Åstrand remained unchanged (p > 0.05).

    Conclusions: Several traditional risk factors for CVD were improved at the 9-month follow-up. This suggests that this model of screening according to the SRF guidelines and simple counselling according to national guidelines might be useful in primary prevention of CVD in patients with RA.

  • 26. Jakobsson, P-J
    et al.
    Svenungsson, E.
    Idborg, H.
    Nilsson, P.
    Wheelock, C.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lehtio, J.
    Koistinen, I. S.
    Proteomics and metabolomics in the classification of SLE subsets2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127 Meeting Abstract PP267, p. 95-95Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Systemic autoimmune diseases (SAIDs) affect about 0.5–1% of Europeans with a remarkable female predominance (80–90%). Present diagnostic entities are vague and rely on fairly old and unspecific criteria that do not use state-of-the-art laboratory parameters. New diagnostic tools and therapeutic/prognostic biomarkers are needed. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is regarded as a prototype for SAIDs and we hypothesized that subgroups of patients with SLE may have different pathogenesis and should consequently be subject to different treatment strategies. Our aim was to find new biomarkers to be used for the identification of more homogeneous patient populations.

    Method: This study involved 320 SLE patients from the Karolinska lupus cohort and 320 age- and gender-matched controls. Plasma samples were analysed using an antibody Luminex assay with 367 antibodies targeting 281 unique selected proteins. Subsets of the SLE cohort and controls were also analysed for their sphingolipid content, as well as by a metabolomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach.

    Results: The Luminex platform revealed 66 proteins found at higher or lower levels in SLE. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has shown very promising data for the components of the complement and coagulation cascades. Metabolomics identified patterns of plasma metabolites that separate SLE from controls. Finally, analysis of >30 sphingolipids demonstrated a specific group of these lipids at significantly higher concentrations in SLE compared to controls. Following treatment, these differences were normalized.

    Conclusions: Preliminary data demonstrate the involvement of several distinct biochemical pathways in SLE that can be used for biomarker discovery and a better understanding of the pathophysiological events underlying the disease.

  • 27.
    Johansson, L.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Kindstedt, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Palmqvist, Py
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Holm, Cecilia Koskinen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kokkonen, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johansson, I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lundberg, P.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Marginal jawbone loss is associated with onset of rheumatoid arthritis and is related to plasma level of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 22-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Disease activity and increased risk of cardiovascular death among patients with psoriatic arthritis2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 45, no Suppl. 128, p. 29-29, article id PP33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Kastbom, A
    et al.
    Klingberg, E
    Verma, D
    Carlsten, H
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Wesamaa, J
    Cedergren, J
    Eriksson, P
    Söderkvist, P
    Genetic variants in CARD8 but not in NLRP3 are associated with ankylosing spondylitis.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 465-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is important for interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) processing as part of an innate immune response. Caspase recruitment domain family, member 8 (CARD8) is an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and possibly also a part of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The objective of this study was to evaluate one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in CARD8 and three SNPs in NLRP3 in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) susceptibility and disease phenotype.

    METHOD: We recruited 492 AS patients from Southern Sweden fulfilling the modified New York criteria for AS, and assessed phenotypic characteristics from medical records and questionnaires. Patients with psoriasis or clinically overt inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were excluded, as were patients without human leucocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27). Three NLRP3 SNPs (rs35829419, rs4353135, and rs10733113) and one SNP in CARD8 (rs2043211) were genotyped by commercially available TaqMan assays, and the results compared at genotype and allele levels to those of 793 population-based controls. In a subgroup of the patients (n = 169), faecal calprotectin was assessed as a marker of subclinical intestinal inflammation.

    RESULTS: The minor allele (A) of CARD8-C10X (rs2043211) was associated with a decreased risk of AS in a dominant model [odds ratio (OR) 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.94, p = 0.012] and at the allelic level (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97, p = 0.02), but was not associated with levels of faecal calprotectin. There was no association regarding NLRP3 SNPs and AS susceptibility, and none of the investigated SNPs were associated with iritis, anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy, or peripheral joint involvement.

    CONCLUSION: In a Swedish population, the minor allele of CARD8-C10X is associated with a decreased risk of AS, but not with levels of faecal calprotectin or disease phenotype.

  • 30. Klingberg, E
    et al.
    Wallerstedt, S M
    Torstenson, T
    Håwi, G
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    The use of complementary and alternative medicine in outpatients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases in Sweden2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 472-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) drugs and methods in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, at rheumatology clinics in western Sweden, and to investigate possible associations between CAM-using habits and other characteristics of the patients.

    METHODS: Randomly selected rheumatology outpatients were asked to complete questionnaires about CAM usage, diagnoses, medication, quality of life (using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, SF-36), fatigue (using the 20-item Multiple Fatigue Inventory, MFI-20), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and visual analogue scales (VAS) for global health, pain, and fatigue.

    RESULT: A total of 200 patients were included, 137 women and 63 men, mean age 55+/-16 and 54+/-15 years, respectively. Ongoing CAM use was reported by 58 patients (29%): 45 (22.5%) were taking CAM drugs, 20 (10%) were using CAM methods. Altogether 130 patients (65%) had used CAM at some time of their lives; 103 patients (51%) had used CAM drugs ever and 90 patients (45%) had used CAM methods ever. Women used more CAM drugs compared with men. Younger patients used more CAM. CAM use was associated with parameters indicating poorer health, mental component score (MCS) and physical component score (PCS) of SF-36, and VAS for global health and fatigue. Ongoing CAM method was associated with less use of immunomodulatory drugs.

    CONCLUSION: CAM use is widespread among rheumatology patients in Sweden. A total of 65% of the patients had experience of CAM treatment. Female sex, younger age, and poor health were associated with CAM utilization.

  • 31.
    Kokkonen, Heidi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Johansson, Martin
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    PTPN22 polymorphism in RA2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 37, no Suppl 123, p. 19-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Lindström, U.
    et al.
    Exarchou, S.
    Sigurdardottir, V.
    Sundström, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Askling, J.
    Eriksson, J. K.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Turesson, C.
    Kristensen, L. E.
    Jacobsson, L.
    Validity of ankylosing spondylitis and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis diagnoses in the Swedish National Patient Register2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 369-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Epidemiological studies of spondyloarthritis (SpA), using ICD codes from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR), offer unique possibilities but hinge upon an understanding of the validity of the codes. The aim of this study was to validate the ICD codes for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated SpA (uSpA) in the NPR against the established classification criteria [modified New York (mNY), Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS), Amor, and European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria].

    METHOD: All patients with an ICD-8/9/10 code of AS or uSpA in the NPR 1966-2009 at a visit to a specialist in rheumatology or internal medicine or corresponding hospitalization, alive and living in Sweden 2009, were identified (n = 20 089). Following a structured procedure to achieve geographical representativeness, 500 random patients with a diagnosis of AS or uSpA in 2007-2009 were selected. Based on a structured review of clinical records, positive predictive values (PPVs) for fulfilling the criteria sets were calculated.

    RESULTS: For those having received an ICD code for AS, the PPVs for fulfilling the mNY criteria or any set of SpA criteria were 70% and 89%, respectively. For those with an uSpA diagnosis (and never an AS diagnosis), the corresponding PPVs were 20% and 79%. The subset with both AS and uSpA diagnoses (overlap = 12%) were as likely to fulfil the mNY criteria as the group that had been coded as AS only.

    CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis codes for AS or uSpA had high PPVs, suggesting that our case identification in the Swedish NPR can be used for nationwide, population-based, epidemiological studies of these diseases.

  • 33. Ljung, L.
    et al.
    Jacobsson, L.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Askling, J.
    Good response on tumour necrosis factor inhibitors is associated with a decreased risk of acute coronary syndrome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127 Meeting Abstract OP11/PP156, p. 8-8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammatory activity, as well as traditional cardiovascular risk factors, is thought to underlie the increased risk of coronary disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We therefore wanted to evaluate whether the level of response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) in RA are associated with the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

    Method: All patients with RA and no previous ischaemic heart disease who started treatment with a first TNFi during 2001–2010 as registered in the Swedish Biologics Register were identified. Of the patients (n ¼ 6615) at risk for exposure (i.e. EULAR response at 5 3 months), response data was available for 75% (n¼ 4938). For each patient, five matched referents were selected randomly from the Population Register. Follow-up was maximized to 1 and 2 years, respectively. The outcome, incident ACS, was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina, or myocardial infarction as the underlying cause of death. Incidence rates were calculated and adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for risk estimations.

    Results: During the first year of follow-up, 33 cases of ACS occurred among the patients. The risk (hazard ratio, HR) of ACS for good responders compared with none responders, fully adjusted, was 0.26 (95% CI 0.08–0.83), and for moderate responders compared with no responders 0.81 (95% CI 0.36–1.79). Compared with the general population no increase in the risk of ACS was observed among good responders (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.27–2.06). The lower risk of ACS among good responders was also noted during 2 years of follow-up.

    Conclusions: Good EULAR response after 5 months of treatment with TNFi in RA patients was associated with a significantly decreased risk of ACS. In patients with good response on therapy, no significant increase in the risk of ACS was detectable in comparison with the risk in the general population during the 2 years after the evaluation.

  • 34.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wiberg, K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology. Östersunds Reumatikersjukhus, Östersund, Sweden.
    Bergström, Ulrica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Öhman, M.-L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Increased incidence of low-energy fractures in RA patients from northern Sweden2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127, Meeting Abstract: PP154, p. 43-44Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Periarticular bone loss is an early sign of joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (1). Patients with RA also have an increased generalized bone loss with development of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and related fractures constitute an important extra-articular complication in RA. Osteoporosis per se is a known risk factor for fracture in the general population. In addition to general background factors (e.g. old age, low body mass, female gender, immobility) treatment with glucocorticoids and disease activity increase the risk of fractures in osteoporotic patients with RA (1, 2). However, the incidence of fracture is not well explored. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of low-energy fractures in RA patients identified within a population-based register of fractures in northern Sweden.

    Method: The register of patients with RA (1987 ACR criteria), consecutively included since 1995 (n = 1178), was co-analysed with the Umeå register of injury data base with regard to low-energy fractures. This data base was constructed in 1993 and covers six districts with a population of 118 000 at-risk adults. All individuals admitted to the emergency ward with fractures are included consecutively. The individuals in this study were followed until fracture or to 1 January 2011. The standard incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated. SIR calculations were performed using the method of indirect standardization relative to the standard population of the geographic origin as the RA patients. Confidence intervals were obtained by treating the observed number of events as Poisson variables with expectation equal to the expected number.

    Results: Among the RA patients, 329 individuals (246 females and 83 males) were identified with a fracture. The corresponding figures among the controls were 14 102 females and 13 313 males with fractures. The odds ratio (OR) for a fracture in the RA patients was 1.38 (95% CI 1.21–1.57) in females and 1.85 (95% CI 1.46–2.32) in males. Stratification for age showed an increased SIR in the individuals aged > 65 years: OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.20–1.64) in females and OR 1.97 (95% CI 1.48–2.57) inmales. The highest SIR was for hip fracture (females OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.21–4.61 and males OR 3.95, 95% CI 1.28–9.23), with a similar mean age for cases and controls (72–75 years). The duration of time from diagnosis of RA to the first fracture was, during the follow-up, mean (SD) 18.7 (14.0) years in females and 14.4 (11.7) years in males. The RA patients had a similar frequency of fractures indoors as outdoors compared with controls, who had a significantly higher frequency of fractures outdoors.

    Conclusions: RA is associated with a higher incidence of fractures. Stratification for age showed increased SIR in those above 65 years of age. The highest SIR was for hip fractures in both females and males.

  • 35.
    Ruge, Toralph
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Södergren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Wallberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Larsson, A.
    Arnlov, J.
    Circulating plasma levels of cathepsin S and L are not associated with disease severity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 371-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovitis and articular cartilage destruction. Increased activities of cathepsin S and cathepsin L, two potent cysteine proteases, are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of the irreversible articular cartilage destruction. Nevertheless, data regarding the potential importance of the cathepsins as circulating biomarkers in RA patients are limited. Method: Subjects enrolled in this study are part of a larger study where patients from the three northern counties of Sweden diagnosed with early RA are followed in an ongoing prospective study. In total, 71 patients were included, along with 44 age-and sex-matched control subjects. Plasma levels of cathepsin S and L were analysed. Disease severity was assessed using the 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Results: Plasma levels of cathepsin S and L were significantly increased in patients with RA compared to healthy controls (p < 0.05 for both). However, in the patients with RA, no association between the cathepsins and the severity of the disease, as characterized by DAS28, was observed (p > 0.51). Conclusions: Although circulating levels of cathepsin S and L were significantly increased in patients with recently diagnosed RA, our data do not support the notion that circulating levels of cathepsins are relevant biomarkers for disease severity.

  • 36.
    Siljehult, Filip
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Ärlestig, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Eriksson, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Concentrations of infliximab and anti-drug antibodies in relation to clinical response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 345-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The efficacy of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) treatment with infliximab (IFX) may be reduced by the development of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs). This study evaluated drug concentration and the presence of ADAs, relative to response, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with IFX.

    Method: Ninety-four RA patients were consecutively included and assessed for disease activity at baseline, and after 14, and 30 or 52 weeks. Serum IFX concentration and ADAs were analysed using in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. ADA analysis was based on binding to TNF-α-coated plates, with the lower detection limit set at mean + 2 sd of controls.

    Results: At 14 and 52 weeks, 74.5% of the patients had moderate to good response. Good responders had significantly higher IFX concentrations than moderate and poor responders at 52 weeks (6.6 ± 1.4 µg/mL vs 3.6 ± 1.3 µg/mL and 2.6 ± 1.6 µg/mL, respectively). An IFX concentration ≥4.66 µg/mL at 14 weeks yielded a moderate to good response at 30/52 weeks, with 91.3% specificity and 39.3% sensitivity. Eleven patients dropped out owing to lack of efficacy and eight owing to side effects; three with IFX concentration ≤ 0.5 µg/mL were ADA positive. At an IFX concentration ≤ 0.5 µg/mL, 43.8% and 30.1% at 14 and 52 weeks, respectively, were ADA positive. None of the good responders had ADAs.

    Conclusion: One-quarter of patients had an IFX concentration ≤ 0.5 µg/mL but only 11.7% had ADAs. High IFX concentration was related to a good response, suggesting that the lack of response could be due to a lack of IFX, rather than to the presence of ADAs.

  • 37.
    Sundström, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Ekergård, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Sundelin, Gunnevi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Exercise habits among patients with ankylosing spondylitis: A questionnaire based survey in the County of Västerbotten, Sweden2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at evaluating exercise habits among patients with ankylosing spondylitis, their clinical status and what mainly restrains these patients from exercising.

    METHODS: In a cross-sectional design study 189 patients completed a self-administrated questionnaire regarding their exercise habits and their clinical status.

    RESULTS: A majority of the patients reported that they performed exercises. The most popular form of exercise was walking. Pool exercise was perceived to relieve the symptoms more than any other exercise and was also rated as the most enjoyable form of exercise. The main obstacle to exercise was lack of time, followed by fatigue. A small number of patients experienced aggravation of symptoms with exercise.

    CONCLUSION: A majority of AS patients exercise, although the frequency of the exercise was low for many patients. The main obstacle to exercise was lack of time and fatigue.

  • 38.
    Sundström, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Gällivare Hospital.
    Stålnacke, K
    Department of Medicine/Rehabilitation, Kiruna Hospital.
    Hagfors, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Supplementation of Omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ankylosing spondylitis2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, p. 359-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the effect of supplementation with omega‐3 fatty acids on disease variables and drug consumption in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).

    Methods: Twenty‐four patients were randomized to either a low‐dose (1.95 g omega‐3/day) or a high‐dose (4.55 g omega‐3/day) supplement. Disease activity, functional impairment, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and drug consumption were assessed during visits at baseline and at weeks 7, 14, and 21.

    Results: Eighteen patients completed the study, nine patients from each group. The patients in the high‐dose group exhibited a significant decrease in disease activity according to the Bath Ankylosing Disease Activity Index (BASDAI; p = 0.038), which was not seen in the low‐dose group. Significant differences were not found on drug consumption or in functional capacity in either of the groups. No significant differences were found when comparing the results between the high‐ and low‐dose groups.

    Conclusion: Omega‐3 fatty acids in adequate doses may have the capacity to decrease the disease activity of AS. However, larger and better controlled studies are needed before any further conclusions can be made on the extent of this capacity.

    Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03009740600844357

  • 39. Sveälv, B G
    et al.
    Täng, M S
    Klingberg, E
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Bergfeldt, L
    Prevalence of diastolic dysfunction in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a cross-sectional study2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction (DD) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) by following recommended criteria from the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and using single variables reflecting DD.

    METHOD: A total of 187 patients with AS (105 men; mean age 51 ± 13 years; mean duration of disease 15 ± 11 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and underwent pulsed-wave and tissue Doppler imaging.

    RESULTS: By following ASE recommended criteria, we observed that 12% of patients with AS had mild DD. We also compared single standard Doppler values with normal age-stratified reference values and showed a wide variation in the number of patients with AS outside the 95% confidence interval (CI) of normal values depending on the variable chosen (ranging from 1.1% to 30.5%).

    CONCLUSIONS: By following recommended criteria, our cross-sectional study shows that DD was infrequent and mild in patients with AS.

  • 40.
    Waehrens, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Bliddal, H.
    Danneskiold-Samsoe, B.
    Lund, H.
    Fisher, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study examined whether measures of self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire and interview yielded different results, determined whether the magnitude of the difference varied among women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM), and investigated the relationships between self-reported and observed ADL ability. Method: The 47 ADL tasks of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire (ADL-Q) and interview (ADL-I), and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) was used to obtain measures of observed ADL ability. Results: Participants across diagnostic groups reported significantly more ADL ability based on the ADL-Q than on the ADL-I. Moderate correlations were found between the ADL-Q and ADL-I ability measures. Although low to moderate correlations were seen between measures based on the AMPS ADL motor scale and the ADL-Q and ADL-I, respectively, correlations between measures based on AMPS ADL process scale and ADL-Q and ADL-I were generally low. Overall, there was no difference in how the measures based on the two modes of self-report related to the observed ADL ability measures. Conclusion: Measures of self-reported ADL ability based on either questionnaire or interview have limited relationship to each other or to observed performance of ADL tasks.

  • 41.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Caidahl, K.
    Klintland, N.
    Nyberg, G.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Increased arterial stiffness and indication of endothelial dysfunction in long-standing rheumatoid arthritis2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Atherosclerotic progression is accelerated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in RA patients and controls by pulse wave analysis (PWA).

    Methods: Thirty RA patients with long‐standing disease and 30 age‐ and sex‐matched controls were examined using applanation tonometry of the radial artery before and after vasodilation by terbutaline (endothelium dependent) and nitroglycerin (endothelium independent). The aortic augmentation index (AIx) and time to reflected wave (transit time, Tr) were measured. Using the peripheral pulse curve, the stiffness index (SI) and the reflectance index (RI) were calculated. Tr and SI predominantly reflect large artery stiffness, whereas Aix and RI also reflect small vessel resistance. The PWA measurements were assessed in relation to adhesion molecules [soluble platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule‐1 (sPECAM‐1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule‐1 (sVCAM‐1) and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule‐1 (sICAM‐1)], selectins (E, L and P), and inflammation [erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), haptoglobin, interleukin (IL)‐6, IL‐1 receptor antagonist (IL‐1‐Ra), IL‐2‐soluble receptor (IL‐2sR), and tumour necrosis factor receptors‐I and ‐II (TNFR‐I and TNFR‐II)].

    Results: RA patients had shorter Tr (p<0.05) and higher SI (p<0.001) than controls, indicating impaired large vessel compliance. After terbutaline, Tr remained shorter (p<0.05), while SI (p<0.01) and AIx (p<0.01) were higher. The post‐terbutaline changes in AIx and RI (ΔAIx, ΔRI), suggested to be the best PWA measurements of endothelial function, were smaller in RA patients (p = 0.06). In RA, L‐selectin and sVCAM‐1 correlated with ΔRI and L‐selectin also with ΔAIx. Both RI and AIx correlated at baseline with a retrospective inflammatory activity score.

    Conclusion: Arterial stiffness was increased in RA patients. Endothelial dysfunction was implicated and correlated with levels of soluble adhesion molecules. Small vessel resistance correlated with the long‐standing inflammatory load in RA.

  • 42.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Öhman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Which factors are related to the presence of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis?2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 373-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Xu, B
    et al.
    Arlehag, L
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Lefvert, A K
    Beta2-adrenergic receptor gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with rheumatoid arthritis in northern Sweden.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 395-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR) belongs to the group of G-protein-coupled receptors and is present on skeletal and cardiac muscle cells and on lymphocytes. The gene encoding beta2-AR (ADRB2) displays a moderate degree of heterogeneity in the human population and the distributions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at amino acid positions 16, 27, and 164 are changed in asthma, obesity, and hypertension and in the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. An involvement of the beta2-AR has also been suggested in human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its animal model. We describe here an increased prevalence of the alleles Arg16 and Gln27 and a lower prevalence of homozygosis for Gly16 and Glu27 in patients with RA. Patients having the genotype combination GlyGly16-GlnGlu27 had higher levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) and a more active disease than other patients. Patients having the genotype Arg16-Gln27+ had higher levels of RF when compared to those having Arg16+Gln27+, and patients who were carriers of Gln27 had a more active disease than non-carriers of Gln27. Our results show an association of beta2-AR SNPs with RA in a population from the northern part of Sweden. Our study also confirms the strong linkage disequilibrium of genotypes at amino acid positions 16 and 27.

  • 44.
    Yxfeldt, A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Hultdin, J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Homocysteine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in relation to inflammation and B-vitamin treatment2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 205-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Zhang, Feng
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Guo, Xiong
    Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Duan, Chen
    Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Wu, Shixun
    Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Yu, Hanjie
    Northwest University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Lammi, Mikko
    Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Identification of differentially expressed genes and pathways between primary osteoarthritis and endemic osteoarthritis (Kashin–Beck disease)2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 71-79, article id 23157206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Primary osteoarthritis (OA) and Kashin–Beck disease (KBD) exhibit similar clinical manifestations and common articular cartilage lesions. Revealing the pathogenetic differences between OA and KBD is helpful for differential diagnosis and may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of OA and KBD. In this study, we compared the genome-wide gene ontology (GO) and pathway expression patterns of articular cartilage derived from both OA and KBD patients.

    Methods: Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labelled, and hybridized using Agilent whole genome microarray analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used to identify differentially expressed genes and pathways between OA and KBD. Nine differentially expressed GO categories and 85 differentially expressed pathways were identified by this study.

    Results: The reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related HOUSTIS_ROS pathway and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-related ABE_VEGFA_TARGETS_2HR pathway were significantly up-regulated in OA compared to KBD. Higher expression levels of the collagen-related COLLAGEN GO, EXTRACELLULAR_MATRIX_PART GO, and nitric oxide (NO)-related BIOCARTA_NO1_PATHWAY pathways were detected in KBD than in OA.

    Conclusions: ROS-induced cartilage lesions seem to be more involved in the pathogenesis of OA whereas NO-mediated chondrocyte apoptosis contributes more to the development of KBD.

  • 46.
    Öhman, M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Öhman, M-L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    The apoB/apoA1 ratio predicts future cardiovascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased mortality and morbidity due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). A high apolipoprotein (apo)B/apoA1 ratio is known to predict cardiovascular events (CVEs) in the population. apoA1 has, besides anti-atherogenic effects, anti-inflammatory properties. The importance of apolipoproteins in the development of CVEs, in the context of lipids, haemostatic factors, and inflammation, was evaluated over 18 years in patients with RA. Method: Seventy-four patients with inflammatory active RA (61 females/13 males, mean age 63.6 years, disease duration 22.1 years) had been previously investigated in a study of haemostatic factors [tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, von Willebrand factor (vWF)], lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides), apolipoproteins (apoA1 and apoB), lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], and markers of inflammation [erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and haptoglobin]. After 18 years, the first CVE during follow-up and the presence of traditional CV risk factors, extra-articular disease, and pharmacological treatment were registered. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify predictors of a new CVE. Results: A new CVE (n = 34) was predicted by the apoB/apoA1 ratio (p < 0.01), the triglyceride level (p < 0.01), PAI-1 (p < 0.01) and tPA (p < 0.01) activities, vWF (p < 0.001), ESR (< 0.001), CRP (< 0.05), and haptoglobin (p < 0.05). apoA1 (p = 0.056) and apoB (p < 0.05) correlated weakly and inversely with haptoglobin and CRP, respectively. In a multiple Cox regression model, adjusted for gender and previous CVD, the apoB/apoA1 ratio significantly predicted a new CVE, as did vWF, PAI-1, and ESR. Conclusions: The apoB/apoA1 ratio was a good predictor of CVE during 18 years of follow-up in patients with active RA. Apolipoproteins correlated negatively with inflammation.

1 - 46 of 46
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf