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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Mahboobah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Stål, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Human extraocular muscles in ALS2010In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 3494-3501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To investigate the general morphology, fiber type content, and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition of extraocular muscles (EOMs) from postmortem donors with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to evaluate whether EOMs are affected or truly spared in this disease. METHODS. EOM and limb muscle samples obtained at autopsy from ALS donors and EOM samples from four control donors were processed for immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies against distinct MyHC isoforms and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In addition, hematoxylin and eosin staining and nicotinamide tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR) activity were studied. RESULTS. Wide heterogeneity was observed in the appearance of the different EOMs from each single donor and between donors, irrespective of ALS type or onset. Pathologic morphologic findings in ALS EOMs included presence of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers, either clustered in groups or scattered; increased amounts of connective tissue; and areas of fatty replacement. The population of fibers stained with anti-MyHCslow tonic was smaller than that of MyHCIpositive fibers and was mostly located in the orbital layer in most of the ALS EOM samples, whereas an identical staining pattern for both fiber populations was observed in the control specimens. MyHCembryonic was notably absent from the ALS EOMs. CONCLUSIONS. The EOMs showed signs of involvement with altered fiber type composition, contractile protein content, and cellular architecture. However, when compared to the limb muscles, the EOMs were remarkably preserved. EOMs are a useful model for the study of the pathophysiology of ALS.

  • 2.
    Ambarki, Khalid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Jóhannesson, Gauti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Zarrinkoob, Laleh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Birgander, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Blood flow of ophthalmic artery in healthy individuals determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging2013In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 2738-2745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Recent development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new possibilities to assess ocular blood flow. This prospective study evaluates the feasibility of phase-contrast MRI (PCMRI) to measure flow rate in the ophthalmic artery (OA) and establish reference values in healthy young (HY) and elderly (HE) subjects.

    METHODS: Fifty HY subjects (28 females, 21-30 years of age) and 44 HE (23 females, 64-80 years of age) were scanned on a 3-Tesla MR system. The PCMRI sequence had a spatial resolution of 0.35 mm per pixel, with the measurement plan placed perpendicularly to the OA. Mean flow rate (Qmean), resistive index (RI), and arterial volume pulsatility of OA (ΔVmax) were measured from the flow rate curve. Accuracy of PCMRI measures was investigated using a vessel-phantom mimicking the diameter and the flow rate range of the human OA.

    RESULTS: Flow rate could be assessed in 97% of the OAs. Phantom investigations showed good agreement between the reference and PCMRI measurements with an error of <7%. No statistical difference was found in Qmean between HY and HE individuals (HY: mean ± SD = 10.37 ± 4.45 mL/min; HE: 10.81 ± 5.15 mL/min, P = 0.655). The mean of ΔVmax (HY: 18.70 ± 7.24 μL; HE: 26.27 ± 12.59 μL, P < 0.001) and RI (HY: 0.62 ± 0.08; HE: 0.67 ± 0.1, P = 0.012) were significantly different between HY and HE.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that the flow rate of OA can be quantified using PCMRI. There was an age difference in the pulsatility parameters; however, the mean flow rate appeared independent of age. The primary difference in flow curves between HE and HY was in the relaxation phase of the systolic peak.

  • 3. Behndig, A
    et al.
    Karlsson, K
    Johansson, B O
    Brännström, T
    Marklund, S L
    Superoxide dismutase isoenzymes in the normal and diseased human cornea.2001In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 42, no 10, p. 2293-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The human cornea, a tissue much exposed to oxidative stress, is rich in extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD). In this study, the contents and distributions of the SOD isoenzymes in the normal human cornea were compared with those in corneas affected by keratoconus and bullous keratopathy.

    METHODS: The central and peripheral parts of normal human corneas were analyzed separately. Central corneal buttons were obtained from patients with keratoconus and bullous keratopathy who were undergoing primary keratoplasty or retransplantation. SOD enzymatic activities were determined by a direct spectrophotometric method, and extracellular SOD and the cytosolic Cu- and Zn-containing SOD (CuZn-SOD) proteins were determined with ELISA and studied with immunohistochemistry.

    RESULTS: The total SOD content, and particularly the extracellular SOD content, was lower in the central than in the peripheral normal cornea. CuZn-SOD and extracellular SOD were demonstrated in all three corneal layers. CuZn-SOD was found in cells, whereas extracellular SOD appeared to be localized on cell surfaces, in basal membranes, and in the stroma. In keratoconus, corneal levels of extracellular SOD were half those in the control corneas, whereas CuZn-SOD and the mitochondrial Mn-containing SOD levels were normal. In bullous keratopathy, apart from edematous dilution, SOD isoenzyme levels were essentially normal. In a remarkable finding, the same pattern in SOD isoenzyme levels as in the original disease was also found at retransplantation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular SOD and CuZn-SOD show markedly different distribution patterns within the human cornea. Extracellular SOD activity in the central cornea is halved in keratoconus, compared with that in normal control corneas. The finding of a similar reduction at retransplantation in keratoconus suggests reduced corneal extracellular SOD synthesis in cells of the host as a cause of the low enzyme levels.

  • 4.
    Borbely, Gabor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Löfgren, Filip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Sloniecka, Marta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Backman, Ludvig J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Danielson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    The role of neurokinin A in corneal wound repair2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 7, article id Meeting Abstract: 725Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Byström, Berit
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Carracedo, Sergio
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Gullberg, Donald
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Alpha11 integrin in the human cornea: importance in development and disease.2009In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 5044-5053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To examine the distribution of the alpha11 integrin chain in the human cornea during fetal development and in normal and diseased adult human corneas.

    METHODS: Six fetal corneas, 10 to 20 weeks of gestation (wg), and 18 adult corneas including 3 normal, 7 with keratoconus, 5 with pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK), 2 with Fuchs' corneal dystrophy, and 1 with a scar after deep lamellar keratoplasty (DLKP) were processed for immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies against the alpha11 integrin chain; collagen I, IV, and V; and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). The cellular source of alpha11 integrin chain was further investigated in cell cultures.

    RESULTS: At 10 to 17 wg, the alpha11 integrin chain was predominantly present in the anterior corneal stroma. At 20 wg, in normal adult corneas and in Fuchs' dystrophy corneas there was weak staining in the stroma. The PBK corneas showed variable and weak staining, generally accentuated in the posterior stroma near Descemet's membrane. In contrast, the anterior portion of the stroma in the keratoconus corneas was strongly stained in an irregular streaky pattern. Human corneal fibroblasts/myofibroblasts produced alpha11 integrin chain in culture. Cultures treated with TGF-beta showed higher content of both alpha-SMA and the alpha11 integrin chain.

    CONCLUSIONS: The presence of the alpha11 integrin chain during early corneal development and the enhanced expression in scarred keratoconus corneas indicates that this integrin chain is likely to play an important role in collagen deposition during corneal development and in keratoconus with a scarring component and compromised basement membrane integrity.

  • 6.
    Byström, Berit
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Virtanen, Ismo
    Rousselle, Patricia
    Gullberg, Donald
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Distribution of laminins in the developing human eye2006In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 777-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To examine the distribution of laminin (Ln) chains in basement membranes (BMs) of the human cornea, lens, and retina in fetal development. METHODS: Ten fetal eyes (9-20 weeks of gestation [wg]) were serially sectioned and treated with specific antibodies against the Ln-alpha1, -alpha2, -alpha3, -alpha4, -alpha5, -beta1, -beta2, -beta3, and -gamma1 chains. RESULTS: The BM of the corneal epithelium was reactive for Ln-alpha3, -alpha5, -beta1, and beta3 chains through all ages, whereas the Ln-alpha1 chain was present at 9 to 12 wg and the Ln-alpha4 chain from 10 wg. The Descemet's membrane (DM) was labeled with the Ln-alpha1 and -alpha4 chains at 10 to 17 wg, the Ln-alpha5 chain from 10 wg, the Ln-beta1 chain at 11 to 17 wg, and the Ln-beta3 chain from 17 wg. The Ln-alpha1, alpha5, -beta1, and -beta2 chains were present in the lens capsule and the internal limiting membrane (ILM) through all ages. The Bruch's membrane (BrM) was immunoreactive for the Ln-alpha3, alpha4, -alpha5, -beta1, and -beta2 chains through all ages, whereas the Ln-alpha1 chain was absent from 20 wg onward. The Ln-alpha2 chain was not detected in the eye, but it was present in the extraocular muscles. CONCLUSIONS: BMs play an important role during morphogenesis, in that they influence cell proliferation, migration, and tissue differentiation. Lns are the major noncollagenous component of BMs. The presence of four different alpha chains, three beta chains, and one gamma chain of Ln in the eye reveals a high degree of complexity from the early stages of development and suggests an important role for the different Ln chains in human ocular differentiation.

  • 7. Di, Guohu
    et al.
    Qi, Xia
    Zhao, Xiaowen
    Zhang, Songmei
    Danielson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Zhou, Qingjun
    Corneal Epithelium-Derived Neurotrophic Factors Promote Nerve Regeneration2017In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 58, no 11, p. 4695-4702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To explore the neurotrophic factor expression in corneal epithelium and evaluate their effects on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurite outgrowth and corneal nerve regeneration in mice. METHODS. The expression of neurotrophic factors was compared among the intact, regenerating, and regenerated mouse corneal epithelium. Mouse primary TG neurons were treated with the conditioned medium of mouse corneal epithelial cells. Nerve growth factor (NGF) neutralizing antibody and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) neutralizing antibody were used to evaluate their roles in mouse corneal nerve regeneration and TG neurite outgrowth. The promoting effects of NGF and GDNF for the corneal nerve regeneration were further evaluated in the diabetic mice. RESULTS. The expression of NGF and GDNF showed significant up-regulation in regenerating corneal epithelium and return to the preinjury levels in the regenerated epithelium, which was consistent with the progress of corneal subbasal nerve regeneration. The conditioned medium of corneal epithelial cells promoted the TG neurite outgrowth with extended branching and elongation. Furthermore, the blockage of either NGF or GDNF significantly impaired the promotion of the neurite outgrowth by the conditioned medium or the corneal nerve regeneration in normal mice. Moreover, the expression of NGF and GDNF was attenuated in the diabetic regenerating corneal epithelium as compared to that in normal mice, while exogenous NGF or GDNF supplement promoted the corneal epithelial and nerve regeneration in diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS. Corneal epithelium expresses multiple neurotrophic factors, among which NGF and GDNF may play an important role in the corneal nerve regeneration.

  • 8.
    Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Parkkonen, Kimmo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Nord, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    von Hoffsten, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Li, Zhenlin
    Univ Paris 06, CNRS, INSERM, Inst Biol Paris Seine, Paris, France.
    Desmin in extraocular muscles2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    An applanation resonator sensor for measuring intraocular pressure using combined continuous force and area measurement2003In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 3017-3024Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Fast, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Holm, Linus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    McLoon, Linda K.
    Engel, Stephen
    Eye vergence is limited by adaptation2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose : What limits vergence abilities? Current models propose that vergence movements are controlled by a phasic component, which responds to image disparities, and a slower tonic component that adapts based on the output of the phasic component. Adaptation in the tonic component frees the phasic component to compensate for further image disparities. Limits of vergence should arise when the tonic component can no longer adapt, but this failure has yet to be observed empirically. We tested the hypothesis that vergence limits would arise when there was evidence of a weakening adaptation in the tonic component.

    Methods : We adapted the vergence system of 6 subjects using a Wheatstone stereoscope. Binocular eye position was collected with an Eyelink 1000 eyetracker. Subjects binocularly viewed a detailed image of a natural scene. The image was initially presented at zero disparity, and moved laterally in one eye at a rate of 0.5°/s to reach 4° of eccentricity, where it remained for 5 m. Then the image moved in blocks, where each block comprised 1° of movement followed by 5 m of viewing at the new eccentricity. Blocks repeated until subjects experienced diplopia for 75% of a block. The eyetracker was used to calculate the angle between the eyes optical axes, which we term divergence. Phoria was measured every 30 s by calculating divergence when the image in one eye was replaced with a gray field for 5 s. As a control, subjects also viewed the display with one image moving continuously without the 5 m adaptation periods.

    Results : Subjects were able to fuse the images until eye divergence reached 7.14°, on average. We used phoria to estimate adaptation in the tonic component, with larger phorias indicating less adaptation. Adaptation, as measured by phoria, decreased over successive blocks (linear trend, p < 0.01). In addition, subjects reached a significantly greater divergence with adaptation than in the control condition (5.17°, p = 0.02).

    Conclusions : Our results support the hypothesis that the amount of vergence normal viewers can produce is limited by adaptation in the tonic component. In earlier blocks, when the tonic component adapted more fully, subjects were able to fuse the images, but in later blocks adaptation of the tonic component lagged behind, and diplopia was experienced. Future work can explore how the tonic component could adapt further, allowing the eyes to experience vergence angles unreachable in normal experience.

  • 11.
    Golovleva, Irina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Jonsson, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Burstedt, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Heterogeneity and complexity of EYS mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in northern Sweden2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Haargaard, Birgitte
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark & Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, Elisabeth W
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
    Poulsen, Gry
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
    Wohlfahrt, Jan
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
    la Cour, Morten
    Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Melbye, Mads
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
    Risk of retinal detachment after pediatric cataract surgery2014In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 2947-2951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term risk of retinal detachment following pediatric cataract surgery and to identify risk factors for retinal detachment.

    METHODS: We included all children (aged 0 to 17 years) who during the time period of 1977 to 2005 underwent pediatric cataract surgery in Denmark, excluding cataract cases caused by trauma, or acquired systemic or acquired ocular pathology, and cases with ocular anomalies associated with the development of retinal detachment. Cases of cataract were ascertained from the mandatory Danish National Patient Register, and information on retinal detachment was based on medical chart review.

    RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3%-11%) among cataract patients. In otherwise normal children having isolated cataract, the risk was 3% (95% CI: 0%-7%). A significantly higher risk of developing retinal detachment was found in children with mental retardation (23% [95% CI: 9%-35%]) or in cataract cases with other ocular or systemic anomalies (16% [95% CI: 6%-24%]).

    CONCLUSIONS: The estimated overall risk of retinal detachment 20 years after pediatric cataract surgery was 7%, but only 3% for isolated cataract. Particularly high risks of retinal detachment after cataract surgery were associated with mental retardation and having other ocular or systemic diseases.

  • 13.
    Harandi, Vahid M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Gaied, Aida RN
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Unchanged neurotrophic factors and their receptors correlate with sparing in extraocular muscles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 15, p. 6831-6842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on the extraocular muscles (EOMs) by examining the distribution of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and their receptors in EOMs and limb muscles from ALS transgenic mice.

    Methods: Muscle samples collected from transgenic mice overexpressing human superoxide dismutase type 1 mutations (SOD1G93A, the most widely used mouse model of ALS) at 50 and 150 days as well as age-matched controls were analyzed with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and the neurotrophin receptors p75NTR, tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptor TrkB and TrkC, and GDNF family receptor alpha-1 (GFRα-1).

    Results: There was an intrinsic difference in NTF expression between EOMs and limb muscles in control mice: EOMs presented significantly lower number of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) labeled for BDNF and NT-4 at 50 days, and for BDNF and GDNF at 150 days, compared with the control limb muscles of corresponding age. In ALS transgenic mice at 150 days, NTF expression in limb muscles was significantly changed but not in EOMs: the limb muscles presented a significant decline in the number of NMJs labeled for BDNF, NT-4, GDNF, p75NTR, TrkB, and TrkC, which was not observed in EOMs.

    Conclusions: The significant differences in expression of NTFs on NMJs between EOMs and limb muscles in both control and ALS transgenic mice suggest that NTF may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALS and the resistance of EOMs to the disease.

  • 14.
    Janbaz, Adrihan H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Liu, Jingxia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Intermediate Filaments in the Human Extraocular Muscles2014In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 5151-5159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE.

    To investigate the distribution of the intermediate filament (IF) proteins desmin, vimentin, and nestin in human extraocular muscles (EOMs). METHODS. Healthy adult EOM samples were serially sectioned (5 and 1 mu m) and processed for immunohistochemistry, with specific antibodies (Abs) against desmin, vimentin, and nestin and different myosin heavy chains (MyHCs), including the newly characterized Ab MYH7b against MyHC slow tonic. The distribution of desmin was also studied in EOMs at 16 to 18 weeks of gestation.

    RESULTS.

    Desmin was present in the vast majority of muscle fibers. Notably, muscle fibers that contained MyHC slow tonic were either unlabeled or very weakly labeled with three different Abs against desmin. These muscle fibers had normal cytoarchitecture and intact basement membrane. In fetal muscle, desmin was also absent or weak in myotubes containing MyHC slow tonic. Nestin was detected in a large proportion of muscle fibers in the orbital layer and to some extent also in the global layer, whereas no muscle fibers contained vimentin. Desmin and nestin were enriched at neuromuscular junctions, as in limb muscle. In contrast, some myotendinous junctions lacked desmin or nestin.

    CONCLUSIONS.

    The human EOMs differed significantly from the other muscles in the body with respect to their IF composition. Desmin, hitherto regarded as a ubiquitous muscle cytoskeletal protein, was absent or only present in trace amounts in a subset of normal muscle fibers in adult and fetal EOMs. Nestin, normally downregulated early in the postnatal period, was present in a high proportion of adult muscle fibers.

  • 15.
    Johannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Ambarki, Khalid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Linden, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Age-dependency of ocular parameters - a cross sectional study of young and old healthy subjects2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 7, article id Meeting Abstract: 116Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate aging effect on ocular parameters inkluding intraocular pressure (IOP) measured with different tonometry methods in healthy young (HY) and elderly (HE) subjects.

    Methods: Fifty eyes of 50 HY subjects (28 females, 22-31 years of age) and 43 eyes of 43 HE subjects (22 females, 64-79 years of age) were included. IOP was measured with four tonometry methods in a standardized order: Ocular Response Analyser (ORA), Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT), Applanation Resonance Tonometry (ART) and Goldmann Applanation Tonometry (GAT). Other measurements included axial length (AL), central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal curvature (CC), ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) and aqueous humor (aq).

    Results: The mean IOP (HY/HE; mmHg ± standard deviation) was 13.9 ± 2.7/16.4 ± 3.4 with ORA, 15.1 ± 2.1/16.3 ± 3.1 with DCT, 12.3 ± 2.0/13.7 ± 2.8 with GAT and 13.1 ± 2.2/12.1 ± 2.5 with ART. IOP was significantly higher (difference ± standard error) in HE compared to HY measured with ORA (+2.5 mmHg ± 0.6), GAT (+1.4 ± 0.5) and DCT (+1.2 ± 0.6). There was a trend towards lower IOP in HE when measured with ART (-1.0 ± 0.5, p=0.05). There was no difference between HE and HY in CCT, CC, AL or OPA.

    Conclusions: Tonometry methods are affected differently by age. IOP was measured higher in elderly people with ORA, DCT and GAT in this Scandinavian population. This effect was not seen in measurements with ART. Other ocular parameters did not differ between the age groups indicating that these measured parameters are not influenced by age in this population.

  • 16.
    Kawasaki, Aki
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Crippa, Sylvain V
    Kardon, Randy
    Leon, Lorette
    Hamel, Christian
    Characterization of pupil responses to blue and red light stimuli in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa due to NR2E3 mutation2012In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 53, no 9, p. 5562-5569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. We characterized the pupil responses that reflect rod, cone, and melanopsin function in a genetically homogeneous cohort of patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP).

    Methods. Nine patients with Gly56Arg mutation of the NR2E3 gene and 12 control subjects were studied. Pupil and subjective visual responses to red and blue light flashes over a 7 log-unit range of intensities were recorded under dark and light adaptation. The pupil responses were plotted against stimulus intensity to obtain red-light and blue-light response curves.

    Results. In the dark-adapted blue-light stimulus condition, patients showed significantly higher threshold intensities for visual perception and for a pupil response compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.006, respectively). The rod-dependent, blue-light pupil responses decreased with disease progression. In contrast, the cone-dependent pupil responses (light-adapted red-light stimulus condition) did not differ between patients and controls. The difference in the retinal sensitivity to blue and red stimuli was the most sensitive parameter to detect photoreceptor dysfunction. Unexpectedly, the melanopsin-mediated pupil response was decreased in patients (P = 0.02).

    Conclusions. Pupil responses of patients with NR2E3-associated adRP demonstrated reduced retinal sensitivity to dim blue light under dark adaptation, presumably reflecting decreased rod function. Rod-dependent pupil responses were quantifiable in all patients, including those with non-recordable scotopic electroretinogram, and correlated with the extent of clinical disease. Thus, the chromatic pupil light reflex can be used to monitor photoreceptor degeneration over a larger range of disease progression compared to standard electrophysiology.

  • 17.
    Kjellgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Ryan, Michelle
    Ohlendieck, Kay
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ca2+ATPases (SERCA1 and 2) in human extraocular muscles2003In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 5057-5062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the composition of the fibers in human extraocular muscles (EOMs) with respect to the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPases (SERCA)-1 and -2 and to investigate possible correlations between SERCA and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. METHODS: EOM samples were processed for immunocytochemistry with monoclonal antibodies specific against SERCA1 (fast isoform), SERCA2 (slow isoform), or different MyHCs. A total of 1571 fibers were analyzed. Microsomal EOM fractions were analyzed with SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. RESULTS: The fast fibers, containing MyHCIIa, accounted for 79% of the fibers in the orbital layer (OL) and 74% in the global layer (GL). More than 99% of these fibers contained SERCA1, and 86% of them coexpressed SERCA1 and -2. Almost all slow fibers stained with SERCA2; 54% of those in the GL and all in the OL coexpressed SERCA1 and -2. Fifteen percent of the fibers in the GL and less than 1% in the OL were MyHCeom(pos)/MyHCIIa(neg) fibers. All these contained SERCA1 and in the OL also stained strongly with anti-SERCA2. Biochemically SERCA2 was more abundant than SERCA1. CONCLUSIONS: The human EOMs had a very complex pattern of expression of the major protein regulating fiber relaxation rate. The coexistence of SERCA1 and -2, together with complex mixtures of MyHCs in most of the fibers provide the human EOMs with a unique molecular portfolio that allows a highly specific fine-tuning regimen of contraction and relaxation.

  • 18.
    Kjellgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Stål, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Larsson, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Fürst, Dieter
    University of Bonn.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Uncoordinated expression of myosin heavy chains and myosin-binding protein C isoforms in human extraocular muscles2006In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 47, no 10, p. 4188-4193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To examine the distribution of myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) in human extraocular muscles (EOMs) and to correlate the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and the MyBP-C composition of the fibers. METHODS: Samples from 17 EOMs, 3 levator palpebrae (LP), and 6 limb muscles were analyzed with SDS-PAGE and immunoblot or processed for immunocytochemistry with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MyBP-C-fast, MyBP-C-slow, MyHCIIa, MyHCI, MyHCsto, MyHCalpha-cardiac, and MyHCemb. RESULTS: In the limb muscle samples, fast fibers were labeled with anti-MyBP-C-fast and anti-MyBP-C-slow, whereas the slow fibers were immunostained with anti-MyBP-C-slow only, in accordance with previous studies. In 11 EOM samples MyBP-C-fast was not detected, and weak staining with anti-MyBP-C-fast was seen only in a few fibers in the proximal part of 2 muscles. The mAb against MyBP-C-slow labeled all fibers, but fibers containing MyHCI were generally more strongly stained. In the levator palpebrae, immunostaining with anti-MyBP-C-fast was present in some fibers labeled with anti-MyHCIIa and/or anti-MyHCeom. MyBP-C-fast and -intermediate were not detected biochemically in the EOMs. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of MyBP-C-fast and intermediate is an additional feature of the human EOM allotype. The true EOMs have a unique myofibrillar protein isoform composition reflecting their special structural and functional properties. The levator palpebrae muscle phenotype is intermediate between that of the EOMs and the limb muscles.

  • 19.
    Kjellgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Andersen, Jesper
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Myosin heavy chain isoforms in human extraocular muscle2003In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 1419-1425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition of human extraocular (EOM) and levator palpebrae (LP) muscle fibers. METHODS: Adult human EOMs and LP were studied with SDS-PAGE, immunoblots, and immunocytochemistry, with antibodies against six MyHC isoforms. Myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase (mATPase) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-TR activity and fiber area were also determined. RESULTS: Most of the fibers in both layers stained strongly with anti-MyHCIIa. Approximately 14% of the fibers in the global layer and 16% in the orbital layer were labeled with anti-MyHCI. The remaining 24% of the fibers in the global layer and 3% in the orbital layer were not stained with either of these two antibodies, but were reactive to anti-MyHCeom (MyHCeom(pos)/MyHCIIa(neg) fibers). The fibers stained with anti-MyHCI had acid-stable mATPase activity, and the remainder of the fibers had alkaline-stable mATPase activity. Almost all the slow fibers stained with both anti-MyHCI and anti-MyHCslow tonic in both layers. Anti-MyHCalpha-cardiac stained approximately 26% of these slow fibers in the orbital layer and 7% in the global layer. Some slow fibers in both layers lacked staining with anti-MyHCslow tonic or with anti-MyHCalpha-cardiac. MyHCemb and/or MyHCeom were also present in some of the fibers of all the groups. The LP did not stain with anti-MyHCslow tonic. CONCLUSIONS: The present study revealed that the human EOMs have a very complex fiber type and MyHC composition and differ significantly from the EOMs of other species. The features of the LP were distinct from those of the four recti, the obliquus superior, and the limb muscles.

  • 20.
    Kjellgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Virtanen, Ismo
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Laminin isoforms in human extraocular muscles2004In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 4233-4239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To determine the laminin isoform composition of the basement membranes (BMs) in the human extraocular muscles (EOMs) and relate it to the fact that EOMs are spared in laminin alpha2-chain-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. METHODS: Samples from adult human EOMs and limb muscle were processed for immunocytochemistry, with monoclonal antibodies against laminin chains (Ln) alpha1 to -5, beta1 and -2, and gamma1. Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) were identified with acetylcholinesterase reaction. The capillary density was measured in sections stained with anti-Lnalpha5. RESULTS: The extrasynaptic BM of the EOM muscle fibers contained Lnalpha2, -beta1, -beta2, and -gamma1, and, in contrast to limb muscle, it also contained Lnalpha4 and -alpha5, to some extent. The distinct laminin composition of the EOMs was confirmed by the presence of Lutheran protein, an alpha5-chain-specific receptor not found in limb muscle. At the NMJs, there was increased expression of Lnalpha4 and expression of Lnalpha2, -alpha5, -beta1, -beta2, and -gamma1 was also maintained. The capillary density was very high (1050 +/- 190 capillaries/mm(2)) in the EOMs and significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the orbital (1170 +/- 180 capillaries/mm(2)) than in the global (930 +/- 110 capillaries/mm(2)) layer. CONCLUSIONS: The human EOMs showed important differences in laminin isoform composition and capillary density when compared with human limb muscle and muscles of other species. The presence of additional laminin isoforms other than laminin-2 in the BM of the extrasynaptic sarcolemma could partly explain the sparing of the EOMs in Lnalpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

  • 21.
    Köhn, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Burstedt, Marie SI
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Jonsson, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Kadzhaev, Konstantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Haamer, Eneli
    Asper Biotech, Tartu, Estonia.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Carrier of R14W in carbonic anhydrase IV presents Bothnia dystrophy phenotype caused by two allelic mutations in RLBP12008In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 3172-3177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Bothnia dystrophy (BD) is an autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) associated with the c.700C>T mutation in the RLBP1 gene. Testing of patients with BD has revealed the c.700C>T mutation on one or both alleles. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the underlying genetic mechanisms along with a clinical evaluation of the heterozygous patients with BD.

    Methods: Patients with BD heterozygous for the RLBP1 c.700C>T were tested for 848 mutations by arrayed primer-extension technology. Further mutation detection was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), sequencing, denaturing (d)HLPC and allelic discrimination. The ophthalmic examinations were performed in all c.700C>T heterozygotes.

    Results: The clinical findings in 10 BD heterozygotes were similar to those in the homozygotes. The presence of a second mutation, c.677T>A, corresponding to p.M226K was detected in all 10 cases. Segregation analysis showed that the mutations were allelic, and the patients were compound heterozygotes [c.677T>A]+[c.700C>T]. One of those patients was also a carrier of the c.40C>T corresponding to the p.R14W change in carbonic anhydrase IV (CAIV) associated with autosomal dominant RP, RP17. His mother, a carrier of the identical change was declared healthy after ophthalmic examination. This sequence variant was found in 6 of 143 tested blood donors.

    Conclusions: The high frequency of arRP in northern Sweden is due to two mutations in the RLBP1 gene: c.677T>A and c.700C>T. BD is caused by the loss of CRALBP function due to changed physical features and impaired activity of retinoid binding. The CAIV p.R14W sequence variant found in one of the patients with a BD phenotype is a benign polymorphism in a population of northern Sweden.

  • 22. Lagali, Neil S.
    et al.
    Allgeier, Stephan
    Guimaraes, Pedro
    Badian, Reza A.
    Ruggeri, Alfredo
    Koehler, Bernd
    Utheim, Tor Paaske
    Peebo, Beatrice Bourghardt
    Peterson, Magnus
    Dahlin, Lars
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Analysis of corneal subbasal nerve plexus from wide-area mosaics in healthy subjects and in type 2 diabetics2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Lagali, Neil S.
    et al.
    Allgeier, Stephan
    Guimaraes, Pedro
    Badian, Reza A.
    Ruggeri, Alfredo
    Koehler, Bernd
    Utheim, Tor Paaske
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Peterson, Magnus
    Dahlin, Lars B.
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Reduced Corneal Nerve Fiber Density in Type 2 Diabetes by Wide-Area Mosaic Analysis2017In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 58, no 14, p. 6318-6327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To determine if corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBP) parameters derived from wide-area depth-corrected mosaic images are associated with type 2 diabetes.

    METHODS. One hundred sixty-three mosaics were produced from eyes of 82 subjects by laser-scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Subjects were of the same age, without (43 subjects) or with type 2 diabetes (39 subjects). Mosaic corneal nerve fiber length density (mCNFL) and apical whorl corneal nerve fiber length density (wCNFL) were quantified and related to the presence and duration of diabetes (short duration < 10 years and long duration ≥10 years).

    RESULTS. In mosaics with a mean size of 6 mm2 in subjects aged 69.1 ± 1.2 years, mCNFL in type 2 diabetes was reduced relative to nondiabetic subjects (13.1 ± 4.2 vs. 15.0 ± 3.2 mm/mm2, P = 0.018). Also reduced relative to nondiabetic subjects was mCNFL in both short-duration (14.0 ± 4.0 mm/mm2, 3.2 ± 3.9 years since diagnosis) and long-duration diabetes (12.7 ± 4.2 mm/mm2, 15.4 ± 4.2 years since diagnosis; ANOVA P =0.023). Lower mCNFL was associated with presence of diabetes (=0.032) and increased hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (P = 0.047). By contrast, wCNFL was unaffected by diabetes or HbA1c (P > 0.05). Global SBP patterns revealed marked degeneration of secondary nerve fiber branches outside the whorl region in long-duration diabetes.

    CONCLUSIONS. Wide-area mosaic images provide reference values for mCNFL and wCNFL and reveal a progressive degeneration of the SBP with increasing duration of type 2 diabetes.

  • 24.
    Lindström, Mona
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Tjust, Anton E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Pax7-Positive Cells/Satellite Cells in Human Extraocular Muscles2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 6132-6143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. We quantified and investigated the distribution of Pax7-positive cells/satellite cells (SCs) in the human extraocular muscles (EOMs). METHODS. An immunofluorescence multiple-marker method simultaneously combining two SC markers (Pax7, NCAM), detection of the basement membrane (laminin) and cell nuclei (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]), was used on the anterior, middle, and posterior portions of EOMs from five healthy donors. Pax7-positive cell and SC content, myonuclear content, myofiber cross-sectional area, and myonuclear domain were analyzed in single cross-sections. Between 3915 and 13,536 myofibers per muscle cross-section and myofibers from the entire EOM cross-section were analyzed for quantification of Pax7-positive cells per myofiber (Pax7/F).

    RESULTS. The number of Pax7/F in the human EOMs varies along the length of the muscle with twice as high Pax7/F in the anterior part of the EOMs, but within the range of what has been previously reported for normal adult limb muscles. Furthermore, there are Pax7-positive cells in positions other than the classical SC position and the myonuclear domain size of adult EOMs is noticeably smaller than that previously reported for other adult skeletal muscles.

    CONCLUSIONS. Previous data on differences in Pax7-positive cell/SC abundance between EOMs and limb muscles must be reconsidered and the characteristics of different Pax7-positive cell populations further investigated. Higher numbers of Pax7-positive cells in the anterior portion of the EOMs may have a bearing for strabismus surgery involving sectioning of the muscle fibers.

  • 25.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Different impact of ALS on laminin isoforms in human extraocular muscles versus limb muscles2011In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 4842-4852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To determ ine the impact of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on the extraocular muscles (EOMs) by examining the laminin isoform composition of the basement membranes (BMs) in EOMs and limb muscles from donors with ALS.

    Methods. Muscle samples collected at autopsy from ALS donors and from transgenic mice overexpressing human SOD1 mutations (D90A or G93A), and age-matched controls were analyzed with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against laminin chain α2 (Lnα2), Lnα4, Lnα5, Lnβ1, Lnβ2 and Lnγ1. Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) were identified with α-bungarotoxin.

    Results. Lnα2, the hallmark chain of skeletal muscle, and Lnβ2 were absent or partially absent from the BMs in a variable number of muscle fibers in most of the ALS EOMs. Three ALS donors showed dramatic decrease in the levels of these chains around their muscle fibers and NMJs. Changes in Lnα2 were not age-related and were also present in EOMs of ALS mouse models. Lnα4 was preserved in the majority of NMJs in EOM but absent in the majority of NMJs in limb muscle of ALS. The BMs around muscle fibers, NMJs, nerves and blood vessels of the majority of EOMs of ALS donors had rather normal appearance and laminin composition, but heterogeneity was observed among EOM samples of individual ALS donors and between ALS donors.

    Conclusions. The present study showed distinct impact of ALS on EOMs as compared to limb muscles. The EOMs maintained a normal laminin composition in their NMJs which may be instrumental for the fact that they are not typically affected in ALS.

  • 26.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    A novel type of multiterminal motor endplate in human extraocular muscles2018In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 539-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the relation between type of motor endplate, acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit composition, and fiber types in human extraocular muscles (EOMs).

    Methods: EOM samples collected from subjects aged 34 to 82 years were serially sectioned and processed for immunohistochemistry, with specific antibodies against different myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms, neurofilament, synaptophysin, and adult epsilon (ε) and fetal gamma (γ) AChR subunits as well as α-bungarotoxin.

    Results: A novel type of motor endplate consisting of large, multiterminal en plaque endings was found in human EOMs, in addition to the previously well-described single en plaque and multiple en grappe endplates. Such novel endplates were abundant but exclusively observed in myofibers lacking MyHC slow and fast IIa but containing MyHC extraocular (MyHCeom), isoforms. Multiple en grappe endings were found only in myofibers containing MyHC slow-tonic isoform and contained fetal γ AChR subunit. Adult ε and fetal γ AChR subunits, alone or combined, were found in the multiterminal endplates. Distinct AChR subunits were present in adjacent motor endplates of a given myofiber containing MyHCeom.

    Conclusions: Human EOMs have a more complex innervation pattern than previously described, comprising also a novel type of multiterminal motor endplate present in myofibers containing MyHCeom. The heterogeneity in AChR subunit composition in a given myofiber suggests the possible presence of polyneuronal innervation in human EOMs.

  • 27.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Willison, Hugh J
    Pedrosa-Domellof, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Immunolocalisation of GQ1b and related gangliosides in human extraocular neuromuscular junctions and muscle spindles2009In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 3226-3232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To examine the distribution of anti-GQ1b, -GT1a and -GD1b antibody binding in human extraocular muscles (EOMs), axial and limb muscles and muscle spindles and thereby test the hypothesis that their distinctive ganglioside composition provides the molecular basis for selective involvement of EOMs and muscle spindles in Miller Fisher syndrome.

    Methods: Muscle samples from adult human EOMs, vastus lateralis, biceps brachii, lumbrical, psoas and deep muscles of the neck were processed for immunohistochemistry, with monoclonal antibodies against ganglioside GQ1b, GT1a and GD1b. Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) were detected by a-bungarotoxin binding and by acetycholinesterase reaction.

    Results: The vast majority of motor endplates of human EOMs richly bound anti-GQ1b, -GT1a, and -GD1b ganglioside antibodies. Anti-GQ1b, -GT1a, and -GD1b ganglioside antibody bindings to NMJs in human limb and axial muscle were very scarce but the nerve terminals inside muscle spindles and in direct contact with intrafusal fibers were labeled with anti- GQ1b, -GT1a and -GD1b ganglioside antibodies.

    Conclusions: The abundant and synaptic-specific binding of anti-GQ1b, -GT1a, and -GD1b ganglioside antibodies and the rich capillary supply in the human EOMs may partly explain the selective paralysis of these muscles in Miller Fisher syndrome.

  • 28.
    Lundberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Behndig, Anders B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    The mydriatic effect of intracameral epinine hydrochloride2009In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 5336-5338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To compare the mydriatic effect and the short-term corneal endothelial safety of intracamerally injected N-methyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenylamine (epinine) to phenylephrine in a porcine eye model.

    METHODS. One hundred and twelve eyes from newly slaughtered pigs were used in this study. After pretreatment with 20 mg of intracameral acetylcholine to give miosis, 0.15 ml of epinine or phenylephrine 0.3%, 1.5% or 3.0% was given as an intracameral injection. The pupils were filmed during 90 seconds with a video camera connected to an operation microscope, and the mean pupil diameters were measured from the video recordings. In 37 additional eyes, 0.15 ml of the vehicle, 1.5% epinine or 1.5% phenylephrine was injected intracamerally, and the eyes were kept on ice overnight. Corneal endothelial morphology was assessed before and after the treatment. Ten eyes were given no injection and served as controls.

    RESULTS. Epinine had a significantly larger mydriatic effect than phenylephrine at equal concentrations. The endothelial cell loss was equal with both substances, and did not exceed that of the vehicle.

    CONCLUSIONS. Epinine was a more potent mydriatic than phenylephrine in this porcine eye model. The porcine eye model appears suitable as a first efficacy screening of substances for intraocular use. Epinine is a promising candidate substance for intraoperative intracameral use in humans, for example in cataract surgery.

  • 29.
    McLoon, Linda K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences, University of Minnesota, 6 Minneapolis, MN 55455.
    Harandi, Vahid M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Brännstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Liu, Jing-Xia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Wnt and Extraocular Muscle Sparing in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis2014In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 55, no 9, p. 5482-5496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The extraocular muscles (EOM) and their motor neurons are spared in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In limb muscle axon retraction from the neuromuscular junctions occurs early in the disease. Wnts, a conserved family of secreted signaling molecules, play a critical role in neuromuscular junction formation. This is the first study to examine Wnt signaling for its potential involvement in maintenance of normal morphology in EOMs in ALS.

    METHODS: EOM and limb muscle axons, neuromuscular junctions, and myofibers from control, aging, and ALS patients and the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS were quantified for their expression of Wnt1, Wnt3a, Wnt5a, Wnt7a, and beta-catenin.

    RESULTS: All four Wnt isoforms were expressed in most axon profiles in all human EOMs. Significantly fewer were positive for Wnt1, Wnt3a, and Wnt7a in the human limb muscles. Similar differential patterns in Wnt myofiber expression was also seen, except for Wnt7a, where expression was elevated. In the SOD1G93A mouse, all 4 Wnt isoforms were significantly decreased in the neuromuscular junctions at the terminal stage compared to age matched controls. Beta-catenin was activated in a subset of myofibers in EOM and limb muscle in all patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: The differences in Wnt expression in EOM and limb muscle, particularly at the neuromuscular junction level, suggest that they play a role in the pathophysiology of ALS. Collectively, the data support a role for Wnt signaling in the preservation of the EOM in ALS and their dysregulation and the subsequent development of pathology in the ALS limb muscles.

  • 30. McLoon, Linda K.
    et al.
    Vicente, André
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Fitzpatrick, Krysta R.
    Lindström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Pedrosa Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Composition, architecture, and functional implications of the connective tissue network of the extraocular muscles2018In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 322-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We examined the pattern and extent of connective tissue distribution in the extraocular muscles (EOMs) and determined the ability of the interconnected connective tissues to disseminate force laterally.

    Methods: Human EOMs were examined for collagens I, III, IV, and VI; fibronectin; laminin; and elastin using immunohistochemistry. Connective tissue distribution was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Rabbit EOMs were examined for levels of force transmission longitudinally and transversely using in vitro force assessment.

    Results: Collagens I, III, and VI localized to the endomysium, perimysium, and epimysium. Collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin localized to the basal lamina surrounding all myofibers. All collagens localized similarly in the orbital and global layers throughout the muscle length. Elastin had the most irregular pattern and ran longitudinally and circumferentially throughout the length of all EOMs. Scanning electron microscopy showed these elements to be extensively interconnected, from endomysium through the perimysium to the epimysium surrounding the whole muscle. In vitro physiology demonstrated force generation in the lateral dimension, presumably through myofascial transmission, which was always proportional to the force generated in the longitudinally oriented muscles.

    Conclusions: A striking connective tissue matrix interconnects all the myofibers and extends, via perimysial connections, to the epimysium. These interconnections are significant and allow measurable force transmission laterally as well as longitudinally, suggesting that they may contribute to the nonlinear force summation seen in motor unit recording studies. This provides strong evidence that separate compartmental movements are unlikely as no region is independent of the rest of the muscle.

  • 31. Münch, Mirjam
    et al.
    Léon, Lorette
    Crippa, Sylvain V
    Kawasaki, Aki
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Circadian and wake-dependent effects on the pupil light reflex in response to narrow-bandwidth light pulses2012In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 4546-4555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Nonvisual light-dependent functions in humans are conveyed mainly by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, which express melanopsin as photopigment. We aimed to identify the effects of circadian phase and sleepiness across 24 hours on various aspects of the pupil response to light stimulation.

    Methods. We tested 10 healthy adults hourly in two 12-hour sessions covering a 24-hour period. Pupil responses to narrow bandwidth red (635 ± 18 nm) and blue (463 ± 24 nm) light (duration of 1 and 30 seconds) at equal photon fluxes were recorded, and correlated with salivary melatonin concentrations at the same circadian phases and to subjective sleepiness ratings. The magnitude of pupil constriction was determined from minimal pupil size. The post-stimulus pupil response was assessed from the pupil size at 6 seconds following light offset, the area within the redilation curve, and the exponential rate of redilation.

    Results. Among the measured parameters, the pupil size 6 seconds after light offset correlated with melatonin concentrations (P < 0.05) and showed a significant modulation over 24 hours with maximal values after the nocturnal peak of melatonin secretion. In contrast, the post-stimulus pupil response following red light stimulation correlated with subjective sleepiness (P < 0.05) without significant changes over 24 hours.

    Conclusions. The post-stimulus pupil response to blue light as a marker of intrinsic melanopsin activity demonstrated a circadian modulation. In contrast, the effect of sleepiness was more apparent in the cone contribution to the pupil response. Thus, pupillary responsiveness to light is under influence of the endogenous circadian clock and subjective sleepiness.

  • 32.
    Ohira, Akihiro
    et al.
    Izumo, Japan.
    Hara, Katsunori
    Izumo, Japan.
    Johannesson, Gauti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Tanito, Masaki
    Izumo, Japan.
    Asgrimsdottir, Gudrun Marta
    Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Lund, Sigrun H.
    Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Loftsson, Thorsteinn
    Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Stefansson, Einar
    Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Topical Dexamethasone gamma-Cyclodextrin Nanoparticle Eye Drops increase Visual Acuity and decrease Macular Thickness in Diabetic Macular Edema2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 7, article id 2289Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To test the efficacy and safety of topical 1.5% dexamethasone γ-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eye drops (dexNP) for diabetic macular edema (DME) and compare to posterior subtenon injection of triamcinolone acetonide.

    Methods: This was a prospective, randomized controlled trial with 22 eyes in 22 consecutive patients with DME, who were randomized to a) topical treatment with dexNP eye drops x3/day for one month, x2/day the next month and finally x1/day the third month or b) one posterior subtenon injection of 20mg triamcinolone acetonide.

    Results: The central macular thickness (CMT) decreased significantly with dexNP eye drops from 483±141mm to 384±142 mm at 4 weeks and 342±114 mm at 8 weeks. For triamcinolone, CMT decreased significantly at all time points. Visual acuity (logMAR) improved significantly with dexNP eye drops from 0.41±0.3 (mean±SD) to 0.32±0.25 and 0.30±0.26 at 4 and 8 weeks respectively. One third of the eye drop group improved more than 0.3 logMAR units. For triamcinolone, logMAR changed significantly from 0.42±0.28 at baseline to 0.32±0.29 at 4 weeks and 0.33±0.37 at 12 weeks. There was a modest increase in IOP at all time points with dexNP eye drops while no increase was seen with triamcinolone. Serum cortisol was affected by both treatments.

    Conclusions: Topical dexamethasone γ-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eye drops significantly improve visual acuity and decrease macular thickness in patients with DME. The effect is similar to that from subtenon triamcinolone as well as to reports on intravitreal steroid implants and triamcinolone intravitreal injections. A modest increase in IOP was seen with the nanoparticle eye drops but IOP normalized after discontinuation of treatment.

  • 33.
    Olofsson, Eva M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Enhanced diabetes-induced cataract in copper-zinc superoxide dismutase-null mice2009In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 2913-2918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Oxidative stress is thought to contribute to diabetes-induced cataract, and the authors have previously demonstrated that lenses from mice lacking the antioxidant enzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) show elevated levels of superoxide radicals and are more prone in vitro to develop glucose-induced cataract than are wild-type lenses. In the present study the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus on cataract formation in SOD1-null and wild-type mice in vivo was examined.

    METHODS: Eight weeks after diabetes was established by repeated intraperitoneal streptozotocin injections, the mice were killed and the lenses removed and photographed in retroillumination. The cataract was quantified from the photographs by digital image analysis and the lens contents of glutathione (GSH) as well as the lens protein carbonyl contents suggestive of protein oxidation were analyzed.

    RESULTS: The streptozotocin-induced diabetic SOD1-null mice developed more cataract than the diabetic wild-type mice. Also, lens GSH levels were lower in the diabetic SOD1-null mice than in the nondiabetic SOD1-null mice. However, the protein carbonyls were equally raised in the diabetic mice of both genotypes.

    CONCLUSIONS: The increased cataract formation and the compromised antioxidant capacity found in the diabetic SOD1-null lenses thus emphasize the involvement of superoxide radicals in diabetes-induced cataract.

  • 34.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Department of Musculoskeletal Research, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Ylva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Lucas, C A
    University of Sydney.
    Hoh, J F
    University of Sydney.
    Thornell, Lars-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Department of Musculoskeletal Research, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Human extraocular muscles: unique pattern of myosin heavy chain expression during myotube formation2000In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1608-1616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To study the myosin heavy chain composition of the human extraocular muscles (EOMs) during development.

    METHODS: EOMs from human fetuses of 8 to 22 weeks of gestation were studied with immunocytochemistry and gel electrophoresis. Antibodies specific against nine isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were used in serial frozen sections.

    RESULTS: The developing EOMs had a delayed time course of myotube formation and a unique composition and distribution of MyHCs compared with human limb skeletal muscle. The primary myotubes coexpressed two developmental isoforms of MyHCI from the earliest stages. The third developmental MyHCI delineated the future orbital layer at 10 to 12 weeks of gestation. MyHC-slow tonic also appeared early, whereas MyHC alpha-cardiac and MyHC-extraocular, important components of adult EOM, were never detected at the gestational ages studied.

    CONCLUSIONS: The developmental features of the EOMs differed significantly from those reported for limb muscles of the corresponding ages. It is clear that the knowledge of limb muscle development does not fully apply to more specialized muscles, such as the eye muscles. The extreme complexity displayed by the EOMs probably reflects their distinct embryonic origin, innervation, and regulatory program of myogenesis.

  • 35.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    McLoon, Linda K.
    Lindström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    A sturdy connective tissue network surrounds all the extraocular muscle fibers2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Sghari, Soufien
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Gunhaga, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Temporal Requirement of Mab21l2 During Eye Development in Chick Reveals Stage-Dependent Functions for Retinogenesis2018In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 3869-3878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different missense mutations in the single exon gene Mab21l2 have been identified in unrelated families with various bilateral eye malformations, including microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma, but the molecular function of Mab21l2 during eye development still remains largely unknown. METHODS. We have established an in vivo Mab21l2-deficient eye development model in chick, by using a Mab21l2 RNA interference construct that we electroporated in ovo in prospective retinal cells. In addition, we designed a Mab21l2 gain-of-function electroporation vector. Mab21l2-modulated retinas were analyzed on consecutive sections in terms of morphology, and molecular markers for apoptosis, cell proliferation, and retinogenesis. RESULTS. Our Mab21l2-deficient chick model mimics human ocular phenotypes. When Mab21l2 is downregulated prior to optic vesicle formation, the embryos develop anophthalmia, and Mab21l2 inhibition by optic cup stages results in a microphthalmic colobomatous phenotype. Our results show that inhibition of Mab21l2 affects cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, and the expression of Atoh7/Ath5, NeuroD4/Ath3, Isl1, Pax6, AP-2a, and Prox1. In addition, Mab21l2 overexpression hampers cell cycle exit and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). CONCLUSIONS. Our results highlight the importance of a regulated temporal expression of Mab21l2 during eye development: At early stages, Mab21l2 is required to maintain RPC proliferation and expansion of cell number; before retinogenesis, a decrease in Mab21l2 expression in proliferating RPCs is required for cell cycle exit and differentiation; during retinogenesis, Mab21l2 is chronologically upregulated in RGCs, followed by differentiated horizontal and amacrine cells and cone photoreceptor cells.

  • 37.
    Sloniecka, Marta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Backman, Ludvig J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Danielson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Acetylcholine induces proliferation of keratocytes through activation of muscarinic receptors2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 7, article id 723Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The corneal wound healing response is a complex process involving cytokine-mediated interactions between epithelial cells, keratocytes of the stroma, corneal nerves, tear film, and cells of the immune system. The outcome of the response plays a critical role in the preservation of corneal transparency after injury. The wound healing cascade includes epithelial surface closure, keratocyte apoptosis, proliferation and migration, formation of myofibroblasts, and stromal remodeling.<br /> Acetylcholine (ACh) is regarded as a classical neurotransmitter. However, cells outside of the nervous system have been shown to contain and release ACh. It has been reported that ACh stimulates fibroblast and epithelial cells to proliferate, has an anti-inflammatory effect in macrophages, and upregulates collagen gene expression in fibroblasts. ACh, its muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; the enzyme responsible for synthesizing ACh) have been shown to be present in corneal epithelium. However, their role in the corneal stroma and corneal injury has not been extensively studied.<br /> We hypothesize that ACh, upon injury, induces corneal stroma cell proliferation, thus promoting the process of wound healing.

    Methods: Primary human corneal stroma cells were derived from healthy corneas obtained from the local cornea bank. Immunocytochemistry was performed to delineate intracellular presence of ChAT and to characterize mAChRs. Crystal violet and MTS assay were used to asses ACh induced cell proliferation. Expression of the proliferation markers PCNA and Ki67 was analyzed by western blot. To determine what type of ACh receptors are involved in ACh induced proliferation, atropine and mecamylamine were used to block muscarininc or nicotinic ACh receptors, respectively.

    Results: Stromal cells expressed ChAT as well as mAChRs of subtypes M1, M3, M4, and M5. Stimulation of stromal cells with ACh led to increased cell viability and metabolic activity. Expression of PCNA and Ki67 was upregulated in ACh treated cells. Furthermore, mAChRs were the receptor group primarily involved in ACh induced proliferation.

    Conclusions: Corneal stroma cells express ChAT and mAChRs. ACh induces stroma cell proliferation through mainly mAChRs, which suggest that ACh may play an important role in corneal wound healing i.e. wound closure and generation on myofibroblasts.

  • 38.
    Sloniecka, Marta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Backman, Ludvig J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Danielson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Antiapoptotic Effect of Acetylcholine in Fas-Induced Apoptosis in Human Keratocytes2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 14, p. 5892-5902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To investigate the possible antiapoptotic effect of acetylcholine (ACh) in Fas-mediated apoptosis of primary human keratocytes in vitro, and to explore the underlying mechanism. METHODS. Primary human keratocytes were isolated from healthy corneas. Fas ligand (FasL) was used to induce apoptosis in keratocytes. Cell death was assessed by ELISA. Activity of caspase-3, -7, -8, and -9 was measured with luminescent caspase activity assays. Expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) gene was assessed with RT-quantitative (q)PCR. Cytochrome c release apoptosis assay kit was used to extract mitochondria and cytosol. Cytochrome c release, cleavage of Bid, and expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were determined by Western blot. RESULTS. Cell death ELISA revealed that ACh is able to reduce Fas-induced apoptosis in keratocytes. Analysis of the activity of effector caspases-3 and -7 showed that ACh, when added to Fas-treated cells, decreases the activation of both these enzymes. The activity of initiator caspases -8 and -9 also decreased when ACh was added to Fas-treated cells. This antiapoptotic effect of ACh was dependent on ACh concentration and activation of muscarinic ACh receptors. Analysis of the antiapoptotic mechanisms triggered by ACh showed that ACh downregulates expression of FasL-induced NF-kappa B RNA expression, upregulates expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, downregulates expression of proapoptotic protein Bad, reduces cytochrome c release, and prevents proapoptotic Bid protein cleavage. CONCLUSIONS. Acetylcholine has an antiapoptotic effect in a Fas-apoptosis model of human primary keratocytes in vitro. It is therefore possible that ACh may play a role in corneal wound healing, by modulating its initiation phase.

  • 39.
    Tjust, Anton E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Danielsson, Adam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Brännstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Impact of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis on Slow Tonic Myofiber Composition in Human Extraocular Muscles2017In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 3708-3715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To analyze the proportion and cross-sectional area of myofibers containing myosin heavy chain slow-twitch (MyHCI) and myosin heavy chain slow tonic (MyHCsto) in extraocular muscles of autopsied amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with either spinal or bulbar site of disease onset. METHODS. Whole-muscle cross sections from the middle portion of the medial rectus were labeled with antibodies against MyHCI or MyHCsto and laminin. Myofibers labeled with the MyHC antibodies (MyHCI+sto) and the total number of myofibers were quantified in the orbital and global layer of 6 control individuals and 18 ALS patients. The cross-sectional area of myofibers labeled for either MyHC was quantified in 130 to 472 fibers/individual in the orbital and in 180 to 573 fibers/individual in the global layer of each specimen. RESULTS. The proportion of MyHCI+sto myofibers was significantly smaller in the orbital and global layer of ALS compared to control individuals. MyHCI+sto myofibers were significantly smaller in the global layer than in the orbital layer of ALS, whereas they were of similar size in control subjects. The decreased proportion of MyHCI+sto fibers correlated significantly with the age of death, but not disease duration, in patients who had the bulbar-onset variant of ALS but not in patients with spinal variant. CONCLUSIONS. ALS, regardless of site of onset, involves a loss of myofibers containing MyHCI+sto. Only in bulbar-onset cases did aging seem to play a role in the pathophysiological processes underlying the loss of MyHCI+sto fibers.

  • 40.
    Tjust, Anton E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Danielsson, Adam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Loss of myofibers containing MyHC Slow tonic in extraocular muscles of terminal ALS patients with bulbar onset2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 40 of 40
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