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  • 1. Abbas, Sascha
    et al.
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Peeters, Petra H
    Engel, Pierre
    Brustad, Magritt
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buijsse, Brian
    Adarakis, George
    Ouranos, Vassilis
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Suárez, Marcial Vicente Argüelles
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87-1.32) and 1.02 (0.90-1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80-1.19) and 0.90 (0.79-1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (P(trend) = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (P(interaction) = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.

  • 2. Abelsson, J
    et al.
    Merup, M
    Birgegård, G
    WeisBjerrum, O
    Brinch, L
    Brune, M
    Johansson, P
    Kauppila, M
    Lenhoff, S
    Liljeholm, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malm, C
    Remes, K
    Vindelöv, L
    Andréasson, B
    The outcome of allo-HSCT for 92 patients with myelofibrosis in the Nordic countries.2012In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, ISSN 0268-3369, E-ISSN 1476-5365, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1982 and 2009 a total of 92 patients with myelofibrosis (MF) in chronic phase underwent allo-SCT in nine Nordic transplant centers. Myeloablative conditioning (MAC) was given to 40 patients, and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) was used in 52 patients. The mean age in the two groups at transplantation was 46±12 and 55±8 years, respectively (P<0.001). When adjustment for age differences was made, the survival of the patients treated with RIC was significantly better (P=0.003). Among the RIC patients, the survival was significantly (P=0.003) better for the patients with age <60 years (a 10-year survival close to 80%) than for the older patients. The type of stem cell donor did not significantly affect the survival. No significant difference was found in TRM at 100 days between the MAC- and the RIC-treated patients. The probability of survival at 5 years was 49% for the MAC-treated patients and 59% in the RIC group (P=0.125). Patients treated with RIC experienced significantly less aGVHD compared with patients treated with MAC (P<0.001). The OS at 5 years was 70, 59 and 41% for patients with Lille score 0, 1 and 2, respectively (P=0.038, when age adjustment was made). Twenty-one percent of the patients in the RIC group were given donor lymphocyte infusion because of incomplete donor chimerism, compared with none of the MAC-treated patients (P<0.002). Nine percent of the patients needed a second transplant because of graft failure, progressive disease or transformation to AML, with no significant difference between the groups. Our conclusions are (1) allo-SCT performed with RIC gives a better survival compared with MAC. (2) age over 60 years is strongly related to a worse outcome and (3) patients with higher Lille score had a shorter survival.

  • 3. Adolfsson, Jan
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Ahlgren, Göran
    Ahlstrand, Christer
    Andrén, Ove
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Bratt, Ola
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Hellström, Karin
    Hellström, Magnus
    Holmberg, Erik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Hugosson, Jonas
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Petterson, Bill
    Törnblom, Magnus
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Clinical characteristics and primary treatment of prostate cancer in Sweden between 1996 and 2005.2007In: Scand J Urol Nephrol, ISSN 0036-5599, Vol. 41, p. 456-477Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Aglund, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Rauvala, Marita
    Puistola, Ulla
    Ångström, Tord
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences.
    Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stendahl, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gelatinases A and B (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in endometrial cancer-MMP-9 correlates to the grade and the stage2004In: Gynecol Oncol, ISSN 0090-8258, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 699-704Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Agudo, Antonio
    et al.
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Bonet, Catalina
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Affret, Aurélie
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Katzke, Verena
    Schübel, Ruth
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Karakatsani, Anna
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Nøst, Theresa H.
    Lasheras, Cristina
    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Amiano, Pilar
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Dias, Joana A.
    Nilsson, Lena M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Gunter, Marc
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Tsilidis, Kostas
    Riboli, Elio
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2018In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 607-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the 2 major types of gastric cancer. Several foods, nutrients, and nonnutrient food components seem to be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. We assessed the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of gastric carcinoma, overall and for the 2 major subsites: cardia cancers and noncardia cancers. A total of 476,160 subjects (30% men, 70% women) from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were followed for 14 y, during which 913 incident cases of gastric carcinoma were identified, including 236 located in the cardia, 341 in the distal part of the stomach (noncardia), and 336 with overlapping or unknown tumor site. The dietary inflammatory potential was assessed by means of an inflammatory score of the diet (ISD), calculated with the use of 28 dietary components and their corresponding inflammatory scores. The association between the ISD and gastric cancer risk was estimated by HRs and 95% CIs calculated by multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for confounders. The inflammatory potential of the diet was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The HR (95% CI) for each increase in 1 SD of the ISD were 1.25 (1.12, 1.39) for all gastric cancers, 1.30 (1.06, 1.59) for cardia cancers, and 1.07 (0.89, 1.28) for noncardia cancers. The corresponding values for the highest compared with the lowest quartiles of the ISD were 1.66 (1.26, 2.20), 1.94 (1.14, 3.30), and 1.07 (0.70, 1.70), respectively. Our results suggest that low-grade chronic inflammation induced by the diet may be associated with gastric cancer risk. This pattern seems to be more consistent for gastric carcinomas located in the cardia than for those located in the distal stomach. This study is listed on the ISRCTN registry as ISRCTN12136108.

  • 6. Ahlqvist-Rastad, Jane
    et al.
    Albertsson, Maria
    Bergh, Jonas
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Johansson, Peter
    Jonsson, Bertil
    Kjellén, Elisabeth
    Påhlman, Sven
    Zackrisson, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Österborg, Anders
    Erythropoietin therapy and cancer related anaemia: updated Swedish recommendations.2007In: Med Oncol, ISSN 1357-0560, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 267-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Alamdari, Farhood Iranparvar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Rasmuson, Torgny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Angiogenesis and other markers for prediction of survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 5-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Chuang, Shu-Chun
    Boeing, Heiner
    Zuo, Hui
    Tell, Grethe S
    Pischon, Tobias
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Vollset, Stein Emil
    Midttun, Øivind
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Johansson, Mattias
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Severi, Gianluca
    Racine, Antoine
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kühn, Tilman
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Sánchez, María-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Travis, Ruth C
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Panico, Salvatore
    May, Anne M
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kong, So Yeon J
    Freisling, Heinz
    Gunter, Marc J
    Lu, Yunxia
    Cross, Amanda J
    Riboli, Elio
    Vineis, Paolo
    A prospective study of the immune system activation biomarker neopterin and colorectal cancer risk2015In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 107, no 4, article id djv010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Neopterin may be relevant for colorectal cancer (CRC) development, as a biomarker of cellular immune activity exerting pleiotropic effects on cellular ageing, oxidative stress, and inflammation. So far, the association between prediagnostic neopterin and colon and rectal cancer risk has not been evaluated in human populations. Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort using data on plasma concentrations of total neopterin (T-N, sum of neopterin and 7,8-dihydroneopterin) in 830 incident CRC case patients (561 colon and 269 rectal) matched within risk sets to 830 control participants. A subsequent replication study used data from the Hordaland Health Study, where 173 CRC case patients have been diagnosed among 6594 healthy participants over 12 years of follow-up. Results: After multivariable adjustment for a priori chosen CRC risk factors, a "U-shaped" association of T-N with CRC was revealed. Compared with the second quintile of the T-N distribution, the relative risks for the first, third, fourth, and fifth quintiles were 2.37 (95% CI = 1.66 to 3.39), 1.24 (95% CI = 0.87 to 1.77), 1.55 (95% CI = 1.08 to 2.22), and 2.31 (95% CI = 1.63 to 3.27), respectively. Replication of these associations within the Hordaland Health Study yielded similar results. No differences have been observed when the associations were explored by colon and rectal cancer site (two-sided P-difference = .87) and after excluding case patients diagnosed within the first four follow-up years. Conclusions: These novel findings provide evidence of the role of both suppressed and activated cell-mediated immunity as reflected by prediagnostic T-N concentrations in the development of CRC.

  • 9. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    Jansen, Eugene
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Murphy, Neil
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Westhpal, Sabine
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Racine, Antoine
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Duell, Eric J.
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Pischon, Tobias
    Boeing, Heiner
    Biomarker patterns of inflammatory and metabolic pathways are associated with risk of colorectal cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)2014In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 261-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of biomarkers of inflammatory and metabolic pathways are individually related to higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the association between biomarker patterns and CRC incidence has not been previously evaluated. Our study investigates the association of biomarker patterns with CRC in a prospective nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). During median follow-up time of 7.0 (3.7-9.4) years, 1,260 incident CRC cases occurred and were matched to 1,260 controls using risk-set sampling. Pre-diagnostic measurements of C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin, triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), C-reactive protein (CRP), reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), insulin-like growth factor 1, adiponectin, leptin and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) were used to derive biomarker patterns from principal component analysis (PCA). The relation with CRC incidence was assessed using conditional logistic regression models. We identified four biomarker patterns 'HDL-C/Adiponectin fractions', 'ROM/CRP', 'TG/C-peptide' and 'leptin/sOB-R' to explain 60 % of the overall biomarker variance. In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, the 'HDL-C/Adiponectin fractions', 'ROM/CRP' and 'leptin/sOB-R' patterns were associated with CRC risk [for the highest quartile vs the lowest, incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.69, 95 % CI 0.51-0.93, P-trend = 0.01; IRR = 1.70, 95 % CI 1.30-2.23, P-trend = 0.002; and IRR = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.58-1.07; P-trend = 0.05, respectively]. In contrast, the 'TG/C-peptide' pattern was not associated with CRC risk (IRR = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.56-1.00, P-trend = 0.24). After cases within the first 2 follow-up years were excluded, the 'ROM/CRP' pattern was no longer associated with CRC risk, suggesting potential influence of preclinical disease on these associations. By application of PCA, the study identified 'HDL-C/Adiponectin fractions', 'ROM/CRP' and 'leptin/sOB-R' as biomarker patterns representing potentially important pathways for CRC development.

  • 10. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Leitzmann, Michael
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Freisling, Heinz
    Carayol, Marion
    Pischon, Tobias
    Drogan, Dagmar
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Overvad, Kim
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Bouton-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Peppa, Eleni
    Valanou, Elissavet
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Tumino, Rosario
    May, Anne
    van Vulpen, Jonna
    Borch, Kristin Benjaminsen
    Oyeyemi, Sunday Oluwafemi
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Navarro, Carmen
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Assi, Nada
    Ward, Heather A.
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Riboli, Elio
    Boeing, Heiner
    Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer: insights into adiposity and circulating biomarkers from the EPIC cohort2017In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1823-1835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is convincing evidence that high physical activity lowers the risk of colon cancer; however, the underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the extent to which body fatness and biomarkers of various biologically plausible pathways account for the association between physical activity and colon cancer. We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort of 519 978 men and women aged 25 to 70 years followed from 1992 to 2003. A total of 713 incident colon cancer cases were matched, using risk-set sampling, to 713 controls on age, sex, study centre, fasting status and hormonal therapy use. The amount of total physical activity during the past year was expressed in metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-h/week. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples were collected at study baseline. High physical activity was associated with a lower risk of colon cancer: relative risk a parts per thousand<yen>91 MET-h/week vs < 91 MET-h/week = 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57 to 0.96]. In mediation analyses, this association was accounted for by waist circumference: proportion explained effect (PEE) = 17%; CI: 4% to 52%; and the biomarkers soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R): PEE = 15%; 95% CI: 1% to 50% and 5-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D): PEE = 30%; 95% CI: 12% to 88%. In combination, these factors explained 45% (95% CI: 20% to 125%) of the association. Beyond waist circumference, sOB-R and 25[OH]D additionally explained 10% (95% CI: 1%; 56%) and 23% (95% CI: 6%; 111%) of the association, respectively. Promoting physical activity, particularly outdoors, and maintaining metabolic health and adequate vitamin D levels could represent a promising strategy for colon cancer prevention.

  • 11. Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    et al.
    Pischon, Tobias
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Norat, Teresa
    Romaguera, Dora
    Knüppel, Sven
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Dartois, Laureen
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Li, Kuanrong
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Quirós, José Ramón
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Sánchez, María José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Bradbury, Kathryn E
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Siersema, Peter D
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Borch, Kristin
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Kong, Joyce
    Gunter, Marc J
    Ward, Heather A
    Riboli, Elio
    Boeing, Heiner
    Combined impact of healthy lifestyle factors on colorectal cancer: a large European cohort study2014In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 168-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Excess body weight, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and certain dietary factors are individually related to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk; however, little is known about their joint effects. The aim of this study was to develop a healthy lifestyle index (HLI) composed of five potentially modifiable lifestyle factors - healthy weight, physical activity, non-smoking, limited alcohol consumption and a healthy diet, and to explore the association of this index with CRC incidence using data collected within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: In the EPIC cohort, a total of 347,237 men and women, 25- to 70-years old, provided dietary and lifestyle information at study baseline (1992 to 2000). Over a median follow-up time of 12 years, 3,759 incident CRC cases were identified. The association between a HLI and CRC risk was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression models and population attributable risks (PARs) have been calculated. RESULTS: After accounting for study centre, age, sex and education, compared with 0 or 1 healthy lifestyle factors, the hazard ratio (HR) for CRC was 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44 to 0.77) for two factors, 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70 to 0.89) for three factors, 0.66 (95% CI: 0.58 to 0.75) for four factors and 0.63 (95% CI: 0.54 to 0.74) for five factors; P-trend <0.0001. The associations were present for both colon and rectal cancers, HRs, 0.61 (95% CI: 0.50 to 0.74; P for trend <0.0001) for colon cancer and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53 to 0.88; P-trend <0.0001) for rectal cancer, respectively (P-difference by cancer sub-site = 0.10). Overall, 16% of the new CRC cases (22% in men and 11% in women) were attributable to not adhering to a combination of all five healthy lifestyle behaviours included in the index. CONCLUSIONS: Combined lifestyle factors are associated with a lower incidence of CRC in European populations characterized by western lifestyles. Prevention strategies considering complex targeting of multiple lifestyle factors may provide practical means for improved CRC prevention.

  • 12.
    Alexeyev, Oleg
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Bergh, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Marklund, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Association between the presence of bacterial 16S RNA in prostate specimens taken during transurethral resection of prostate and subsequent risk of prostate cancer (Sweden)2006In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 1127-1133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study bacterial 16S RNA in archival prostate samples from 352 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and evaluate whether the presence of bacterial DNA was different in those who later developed prostate cancer (n = 171) and in the matched controls that did not progress to cancer (n = 181).

    Methods: 16S DNA PCR followed by cloning and sequencing the positive samples.

    Results: In 96/352 (27%) of the prostate tissue specimens 16S RNA were detected. Sequence analysis revealed Propionibacterium acnes as the predominant microorganism (23% of 16S RNA positive patients). The second most frequent isolate—Escherichia coli was found in 12 (12%) patients. The other isolates included Pseudomonas sp. (3 patients), Actinomyces sp. (2), Streptococcus mutans (1), Corynebacterium sp. (2),Nocardioides sp. (1), Rhodococcus sp. (1) Veillonella sp. (2). In P. acnes positive samples 62% exhibited severe histological inflammation versus 50% in the bacteria-negative group (p = 0.602). The presence of P. acnes in the prostate was associated with prostate cancer development (OR 2.17, 95% CI 0.77–6.95).

    Conclusions: This study has revealed P. acnes as the most common bacteria in the prostate in BPH. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in contributing to the development of prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer.

  • 13. Ali, Alaa M. G.
    et al.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Wang, Qin
    Gago-Dominguez, M.
    Esteban Castelao, J.
    Carracedo, Angel
    Munoz Garzon, Victor
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Vrieling, Alina
    Rudolph, Anja
    Seibold, Petra
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Muranen, Taru A.
    Aaltonen, Kirsimari
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Ito, Hidemi
    Iwata, Hiroji
    Horio, Akiyo
    John, Esther M.
    Sherman, Mark
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Figueroa, Jonine
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Shah, Mitul
    Hopper, John L.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Andersson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Dossus, Laure
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Olsen, Anja
    Wishart, Gordon C.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Borgquist, Signe
    Overvad, Kim
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Amiano, Pilar
    Riboli, Elio
    Key, Tim
    Pharoah, Paul D.
    Alcohol Consumption and Survival after a Breast Cancer Diagnosis: A Literature-Based Meta-analysis and Collaborative Analysis of Data for 29,239 Cases2014In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 934-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence for an association of alcohol consumption with prognosis after a diagnosis of breast cancer has been inconsistent. We have reviewed and summarized the published evidence and evaluated the association using individual patient data from multiple case cohorts. Methods: A MEDLINE search to identify studies published up to January 2013 was performed. We combined published estimates of survival time for "moderate drinkers" versus nondrinkers. An analysis of individual participant data using Cox regression was carried out using data from 11 case cohorts. Results: We identified 11 published studies suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Moderate postdiagnosis alcohol consumption was not associated with overall survival [HR, 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.05], but there was some evidence of better survival associated with prediagnosis consumption (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.73-0.88). Individual data on alcohol consumption for 29,239 cases with 4,839 deaths were available from the 11 case cohorts, all of which had data on estrogen receptor (ER) status. For women with ER-positive disease, there was little evidence that pre-or postdiagnosis alcohol consumption is associated with breast cancer-specific mortality, with some evidence of a negative association with all-cause mortality. On the basis of a single study, moderate postdiagnosis alcohol intake was associated with a small reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality for women with ER-negative disease. There was no association with prediagnosis intake for women with ER-negative disease. Conclusion: There was little evidence that pre- or post-diagnosis alcohol consumption is associated with breast cancer-specific mortality for women with ER-positive disease. There was weak evidence that moderate post-diagnosis alcohol intake is associated with a small reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality in ER-negative disease. Impact: Considering the totality of the evidence, moderate postdiagnosis alcohol consumption is unlikely to have a major adverse effect on the survival of women with breast cancer.

  • 14. Almquist, Martin
    et al.
    Johansen, Dorthe
    Björge, Tone
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Lindkvist, Björn
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Engeland, Anders
    Rapp, Kilian
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Selmer, Randi
    Diem, Guenter
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Tretli, Steinar
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Metabolic factors and risk of thyroid cancer in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can)2011In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 743-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  To investigate metabolic factors and their possible impact on risk of thyroid cancer. Methods  A prospective cohort study was conducted based on seven population-based cohorts in Norway, Austria, and Sweden, in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can). Altogether 578,700 men and women with a mean age of 44.0 years at baseline were followed for on average 12.0 years. Relative risk of incident thyroid cancer was assessed by levels of BMI, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and by a combined metabolic syndrome (MetS) score. Risk estimates were investigated for quintiles, and a z score distribution of exposures was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results  During follow-up, 255 women and 133 men were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. In women, there was an inverse association between glucose and thyroid cancer risk, with adjusted RR: 95% CI was 0.61 (0.41–0.90), p trend = 0.02 in the fifth versus the first quintile, and a positive association between BMI and thyroid cancer risk with a significant trend over quintiles. There was no association between the other metabolic factors, single or combined (Met-S), and thyroid cancer. Conclusion  In women, BMI was positively, while blood glucose levels were inversely, associated with thyroid cancer.

  • 15. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Zhou, Renke
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Olson, Sara
    Scheurer, Michael
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Lachance, Daniel
    Lau, Ching
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Houlston, Richard
    Jenkins, Robert
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Merrell, Ryan
    Davis, Faith
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    DEMOGRAPHICS AND LIFESTYLE FACTORS IN GLIOMA RISK: A REPORT FROM THE GLIOMA INTERNATIONAL CASE-CONTROL STUDY2016In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 18, p. 57-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Scheurer, Michael E.
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Olson, Sara H.
    Lai, Rose
    Lachance, Daniel
    Armstrong, Georgina
    Zhou, Renke
    Wiemels, Joseph
    Lau, Ching
    Claus, Elizabeth
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Houlston, Richard
    Shete, Sanjay
    Bernstein, Jonine
    Jenkins, Robert
    Davis, Faith
    Merrell, Ryan
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    ATOPIC CONDITIONS, ANTIHISTAMINE USE, AND GLIOMA RISK: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE GLIOMA INTERNATIONAL CASE-CONTROL STUDY2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no Supplement: 3, p. 32-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Scheurer, Michael E.
    Zhou, Renke
    Wrensch, Margaret R.
    Armstrong, Georgina N.
    Lachance, Daniel
    Olson, Sara H.
    Lau, Ching C.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Merrell, Ryan T.
    Davis, Faith G.
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    History of chickenpox in glioma risk: a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC)2016In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1352-1358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic alpha-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted.

  • 18. Amirian, E. Susan
    et al.
    Zhou, Renke
    Wrensch, Margaret R.
    Olson, Sara H.
    Scheurer, Michael E.
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Lachance, Daniel
    Armstrong, Georgina N.
    McCoy, Lucie S.
    Lau, Ching C.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Houlston, Richard S.
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Merrell, Ryan T.
    Davis, Faith G.
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Melin, Beatrice S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    Approaching a Scientific Consensus on the Association between Allergies and Glioma Risk: a report from the Glioma International Case-Control Study2016In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 282-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several previous studies have found inverse associations between glioma susceptibility and a history of allergies or other atopic conditions. Some evidence indicates that respiratory allergies are likely to be particularly relevant with regard to glioma risk. Using data from the Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC), we examined the effects of respiratory allergies and other atopic conditions on glioma risk. Methods: The GICC contains detailed information on history of atopic conditions for 4,533 cases and 4,171 controls, recruited from 14 study sites across five countries. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling to calculate meta-analysis ORs, we examined the associations between glioma and allergy status, respiratory allergy status, asthma, and eczema. Results: Having a history of respiratory allergies was associated with an approximately 30% lower glioma risk, compared with not having respiratory allergies (mOR, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.90). This association was similar when restricting to high-grade glioma cases. Asthma and eczema were also significantly protective against glioma. Conclusion: A substantial amount of data on the inverse association between atopic conditions and glioma has accumulated, and findings from the GICC study further strengthen the existing evidence that the relationship between atopy and glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Impact: As the literature approaches a consensus on the impact of allergies in glioma risk, future research can begin to shift focus to what the underlying biologic mechanism behind this association may be, which could, in turn, yield new opportunities for immunotherapy or cancer prevention. (C) 2016 AACR.

  • 19. Anantharaman, Devasena
    et al.
    Gheit, Tarik
    Waterboer, Tim
    Halec, Gordana
    Carreira, Christine
    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush
    McKay-Chopin, Sandrine
    Zaridze, David
    Mukeria, Anush
    Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Mates, Dana
    Janout, Vladimir
    Foretova, Lenka
    Bencko, Vladimir
    Rudnai, Peter
    Fabianova, Eleonora
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Travis, Ruth C
    Boeing, Heiner
    Quiros, J Ramon
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Kotanidou, Anastasia
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Johansson, Mattias
    Pawlita, Michael
    Scelo, Ghislaine
    Tommasino, Massimo
    Brennan, Paul
    No causal association identified for human papillomavirus infections in lung cancer2014In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 74, no 13, p. 3525-3534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis, but causal associations remain uncertain. We evaluated a potential causal role for HPV infections in lung cancer through an analysis involving serology, tumor DNA, RNA, and p16 protein expression. Association between type-specific HPV antibodies and risk of lung cancer was examined among 3,083 cases and 4,328 controls in two case-control studies (retrospective) and one nested case-control study (prospective design). Three hundred and thirty-four available tumors were subjected to pathologic evaluation and subsequent HPV genotyping following stringent conditions to detect all high-risk and two low-risk HPV types. All HPV DNA-positive tumors were further tested for the expression of p16 protein and type-specific HPV mRNA. On the basis of the consistency of the results, although HPV11 and HPV31 E6 antibodies were associated with lung cancer risk in the retrospective study, no association was observed in the prospective design. Presence of type-specific antibodies correlated poorly with the presence of the corresponding HPV DNA in the tumor. Although nearly 10% of the lung tumors were positive for any HPV DNA (7% for HPV16 DNA), none expressed the viral oncogenes. No association was observed between HPV antibodies or DNA and lung cancer survival. In conclusion, we found no supportive evidence for the hypothesized causal association between HPV infections and lung cancer. (C) 2014 AACR.

  • 20. Ancelle-Park, R.
    et al.
    Armaroli, P.
    Ascunce, N.
    Bisanti, L.
    Bellisario, C.
    Broeders, M.
    Cogo, C.
    de Koning, H.
    Duffy, S. W.
    Frigerio, A.
    Giordano, L.
    Hofvind, S.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lynge, E.
    Massat, N.
    Miccinesi, G.
    Moss, S.
    Naldoni, C.
    Njor, S.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Paap, E.
    Paci, E.
    Patnick, J.
    Ponti, A.
    Puliti, D.
    Segnan, N.
    Von Karsa, L.
    Tornberg, S.
    Zappa, M.
    Zorzi, M.
    Summary of the evidence of breast cancer service screening outcomes in Europe and first estimate of the benefit and harm balance sheet2012In: Journal of Medical Screening, ISSN 0969-1413, E-ISSN 1475-5793, Vol. 19, p. 5-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To construct a European 'balance sheet' of key outcomes of population-based mammographic breast cancer screening, to inform policy-makers, stakeholders and invited women. Methods From the studies reviewed, the primary benefit of screening, breast cancer mortality reduction, was compared with the main harms, over-diagnosis and false-positive screening results (FPRs). Results Pooled estimates of breast cancer mortality reduction among invited women were 25% in incidence-based mortality studies and 31% in case-control studies (38% and 48% among women actually screened). Estimates of over-diagnosis ranged from 1% to 10% of the expected incidence in the absence of screening. The combined estimate of over-diagnosis for screened women, from European studies correctly adjusted for lead time and underlying trend, was 6.5%. For women undergoing 10 biennial screening tests, the estimated cumulative risk of a FPR followed by non-invasive assessment was 17%, and 3% having an invasive assessment. For every 1000 women screened biennially from age 50-51 until age 68-69 and followed up to age 79, an estimated seven to nine lives are saved, four cases are over-diagnosed, 170 women have at least one recall followed by non-invasive assessment with a negative result and 30 women have at least one recall followed by invasive procedures yielding a negative result. Conclusions The chance of saving a woman's life by population-based mammographic screening of appropriate quality is greater than that of over-diagnosis. Service screening in Europe achieves a mortality benefit at least as great as the randomized controlled trials. These outcomes should be communicated to women offered service screening in Europe.

  • 21. Andersen, Niels S
    et al.
    Pedersen, Lone B
    Laurell, Anna
    Elonen, Erkki
    Kolstad, Arne
    Boesen, Anne Marie
    Pedersen, Lars M
    Lauritzsen, Grete F
    Ekanger, Roald
    Nilsson-Ehle, Herman
    Nordström, Marie
    Fredén, Susanne
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Väärt, Jaan
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Geisler, Christian H
    Pre-emptive treatment with rituximab of molecular relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation in mantle cell lymphoma.2009In: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 27, no 26, p. 4365-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Minimal residual disease (MRD) is predictive of clinical progression in mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL). According to the Nordic MCL-2 protocol we prospectively analyzed the efficacy of pre-emptive treatment using rituximab to MCL patients in molecular relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). PATIENTS AND MATERIALS: MCL patients enrolled onto the study, who had polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detectable molecular markers and underwent ASCT, were followed with serial PCR assessments of MRD in consecutive bone marrow and peripheral blood samples after ASCT. In case of molecular relapse with increasing MRD levels, patients were offered pre-emptive treatment with rituximab 375 mg/m(2) weekly for 4 weeks. RESULTS: Of 160 MCL patients enrolled, 145 underwent ASCT, of whom 78 had a molecular marker. Of these, 74 were in complete remission (CR) and four had progressive disease after ASCT. Of the CR patients, 36 underwent a molecular relapse up to 6 years (mean, 18.5 months) after ASCT. Ten patients did not receive pre-emptive treatment mainly due to a simultaneous molecular and clinical relapse, while 26 patients underwent pre-emptive treatment leading to reinduction of molecular remission in 92%. Median molecular and clinical relapse-free survival after pre-emptive treatment were 1.5 and 3.7 years, respectively. Of the 38 patients who remain in molecular remission for now for a median of 3.3 years (range, 0.4 to 6.6 years), 33 are still in clinical CR. CONCLUSION: Molecular relapse may occur many years after ASCT in MCL, and PCR based pre-emptive treatment using rituximab is feasible, reinduce molecular remission, and may prevent clinical relapse.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Long-term side effects after treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Long-term side effects associated with the treatment of Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) have frequently been reported during the last decades. Studies have shown increased mortality in HL survivors. Following Hodgkin’s lymphoma, second malignancies (SM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are the most common causes of death in individuals treated for HL. This study investigates the incidence of side effects such as SM, CVD and infections in a cohort diagnosed with HL in Sweden between 1965 and 1995. In addition, this study identifies covariate risk factors for late side effects in order to develop strategies that prevent morbidity and mortality in HL survivors.

    Methods Using the Swedish Cancer Registry (SCR) at the National Board of Health and Welfare and the Multi-Generation Registry at Statistics (MGR) Sweden, we identified 6946 individuals diagnosed with HL between the years 1965 and 1995, and their first degree relatives (FDR) (n=17 858). In addition we identified the malignancies and inpatient care for CVD and infections for the HL cohort and their FDR. The standard incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated for the risk of SM, CVD and infections. For SM and CVD the risk also was stratified and calculated for family history of disease. The Swedish Hodgkin Intervention and Prevention study (SHIP), a prospective study, invited 702 individuals treated for HL at the age of 45 years or younger and who were treated in the region of Skåne, Uppsala or Umeå. The participants completed a questionnaire and were invited to an out-patient visit to an oncologist with clinical examination and blood tests. Any pathological findings were referred for further investigation.

    Results An increased risk for SM in HL long-term survivors was observed and seems to increase with the number of FDRs with cancer. There was also an increased risk for inpatient care due to congestive heart failure (CHF) and coronary artery disease (CAD). A family history of CHF and CAD further increased the risk for these diseases. The risk for inpatient care due to infections was increased and remained increased after 20 years or longer. The risk for infections was associated with splenectomy and hypothyroidism. Radiotherapy was an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the cohort of the prospective study.

    ConclusionLong-term survivors from HL have an increased risk for developing late side effects such as SM, CVD and infections. Since many HL patients are young and the cure rate from the disease is high, it is of great importance to offer focused surveillance programs to selected individuals who are at high risk, e.g. individuals who received radiotherapy as part of their treatment and who have other known risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, family history and smoking.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical immunology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Gustavsson, Anita
    Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund .
    Erlanson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hagberg, Hans
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical immunology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala .
    Molin, Daniel
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical immunology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala .
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Long term risk of infections in Hodgkin lymphoma long-term survivors2011In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 154, no 5, p. 661-663Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala universitet.
    Gustavsson, Anita
    Lunds universitet.
    Erlanson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hagberg, Hans
    Uppsala universitet.
    Molin, Daniel
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Cardiovascular side effects following treatment of Hodgkin’s lymphoma: comorbidity factors and a strategy for interventionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Björkholm, Magnus
    Linderoth, Johan
    Lagerlöf, I
    Merup, Mats
    Sender, Mark
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Family history of cancer as a risk factor for second malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma2008In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 98, no 5, p. 1001-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study estimated the risk of second primary malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in relation to family history of cancer, age at diagnosis and latency, among 6946 patients treated for HL in Sweden in 1965–1995 identified through the Swedish Cancer Register (SCR). First-degree relatives (FDRs) to the HL patients and their malignancies were then ascertained together with their malignancies through the Multi-Generation Registry and SCR. The HL patient cohort was stratified on the number of FDRs with cancer, and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of developing SM were analysed. In the HL cohort, 781 SM were observed 1 year or longer after HL diagnosis. The risk for developing SM increased with the number of FDRs with cancer, SIRs being 2.26, 3.01, and 3.45 with 0, 1, or ≥2 FDRs with cancer, respectively. Hodgkin's lymphoma long-term survivors treated at a young age with a family history of cancer carry an increased risk for developing SM and may represent a subgroup where standardised screening for the most common cancer sites could be offered in a stringent surveillance programme.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Gustavsson, Anita
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Long-term risk of cardiovascular disease in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors: retrospective cohort analyses and a concept for prospective intervention2009In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 124, no 8, p. 1914-1917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown increased cardiovascular mortality as late side effects in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. This study identifies stratifying risk factors for surveillance and defines concepts for a clinical feasible and noninvasive prospective protocol for intervention of cardiovascular side effects. HL patients diagnosed between 1965 and 1995 (n = 6.946) and their first-degree relatives (FDR) were identified through the Swedish Cancer Registry and the Swedish Multigeneration Registry. For the HL and FDR cohort, in-patient care for cardiovascular disease (CVD) was registered through the Hospital Discharge Registry, Sweden. Standard incidence ratios of developing CVD for the HL cohort were calculated. A markedly increased risk for in-patient care of CVD was observed in HL patients with HL diagnosed at age 40 years or younger and with more than 10 years follow-up. In the HL survivors, a family history of congestive heart failure (CHF) and coronary artery disease (CAD) increased the risk for these diseases. The Swedish Hodgkin Intervention and Prevention study started in 2007. In the pilot feasibility study for prospective intervention (47 patients), about 25% of the cases had side effects and laboratory abnormalities. These patients were referred to a cardiologist or general practitioner. In the prospective cohort, a positive family history for CHF or CAD could be a stratifying risk factor when setting up a surveillance model. The prospective on-going study presents an intervention model that screens and treats for comorbidity factors. This article also presents an overview of the study concept.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Britta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Behnam Motlagh, Parviz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Pharmacological modulation of lung cancer cells for potassium ion depletion2005In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 2609-2616Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Andersson, Britta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Janson, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Behnam Motlagh, Parviz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Induction of apoptosis by intracellular potassium ion depletion: using the fluorescent dye PBFI in a 96-well plate method in cultured lung cancer cells.2006In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Li, Xingru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Li, Aihong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Reduction in WT1 Gene Expression During Early Treatment Predicts the Outcome in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia2012In: Diagnostic molecular pathology (Print), ISSN 1052-9551, E-ISSN 1533-4066, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 225-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) expression has been suggested as an applicable minimal residual disease marker in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We evaluated the use of this marker in 43 adult AML patients. Quantitative assessment of WT1 gene transcripts was performed using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction assay. Samples from both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow were analyzed at diagnosis and during follow-up. A strong correlation was observed between WT1 normalized with 2 different control genes (beta-actin and ABL1, P < 0.001). WT1 mRNA level at diagnosis was of no prognostic relevance (P > 0.05). A >= 1-log reduction in WT1 expression in bone marrow samples taken < 1 month after diagnosis significantly correlated with an improved overall survival (P = 0.004) and freedom from relapse (P = 0.010) when beta-actin was used as control gene. Furthermore, a reduction in WT1 expression by >= 2 logs in peripheral blood samples taken at a later time point significantly correlated with a better outcome for overall survival (P = 0.004) and freedom from relapse (P = 0.012). This result was achieved when normalizing against both b-actin and ABL1. These results therefore suggest that WT1 gene expression can provide useful information for minimal residual disease detection in adult AML patients and that combined use of control genes can give more informative results.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Do rehabilitation needs change during first year after completed adjuvant chemotherapy?2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 31.
    Andersson, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Salander, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brandstetter-Hiltunen, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Knutsson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Is it possible to identify patient´s sex when reading blinded illness narratives? An experimental study about gender bias.2008In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 7, no 21, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Andersson, Oskar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Evaluation of cooperative cytotoxic effects of pro apoptotic drugs on human glioblastoma stem cells2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 33.
    Andersson, Ronny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hofer, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Riklund-Åhlström, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Effects of interferon-[alpha], verapamil and dacarbazine in the treatment of advanced malignant melanoma2003In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 87-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma with either dacarbazine (DTIC) or interferon-[alpha] (IFN[alpha]) as single drugs, or in combination, results in a response rate of approximately 15–20%. This study evaluated the activity and toxicity following treatment with a combination of DTIC, IFN[alpha]2b and verapamil (VPL). Thirty patients with disseminated metastatic melanoma received DTIC 250 mg/m2 on days 1–5 of a 4 week schedule, IFN[alpha]2b 3 MIU on days 1–5 each week, and VPL 80 mg three times a day throughout the cycle, until either disease progression or serious toxicity was observed. Among the 28 evaluable patients, there were four complete responses (CRs), five partial responses (PRs) and eight patients with stable disease (SD). The overall response rate (CR + PR) was 32%. Two patients with a CR were long-term survivors (45 and 34 months) and a third is still in complete remission after 49 months. The fourth CR patient relapsed and died with progressive brain metastases after 8 months. Among the eight patients with SD, one survived for 22 months and another for 34 months. Despite one toxic death, these results suggest that this treatment regimen is well tolerated and seems to be more effective than DTIC alone in a subset of patients. A controlled randomized study would be required to determine the value of adding VPL and IFN[alpha]2b to DTIC.

  • 34. Andersson, S
    et al.
    Hellström, A-C
    Ångström, T
    Stendahl, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Auer, G
    Wallin, K-L
    The clinicopathologic significance of laminin-5 gamma2 chain expression in cervical squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma2005In: Int J Gynecol Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1065-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Degerman, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Dahlin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brannstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Melin, B. S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    TELOMERE LENGTH, ALLERGIES AND RISK OF GLIOMA2017In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 19, no Supplement: 3, p. 23-23, article id Meeting Abstract: P01.03Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Bergenheim, A. Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Rapid induction of long-lasting drug efflux activity in brain vascular endothelial cells but not malignant glioma following irradiation2002In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of radiotherapy on malignant glioma multidrug resistance to chemotherapy was evaluated because patients with glioma often are treated with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance gene (MDR1, mdr1a, and mdr1b) transcripts were found in human and rat glioma cell lines. P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) was immunohistochemically detected in glioma cell lines and in the rat brain vascular endothelial cell line (RBE4). A multidrug resistance pump efflux activity assay demonstrated increased calcein efflux of RBE4 endothelial cells, but not glioma cells, 2 h after irradiation and still increased 14 d after irradiation. The increased efflux was equally inhibited by verapamil with or without irradiation. In the rat intracranial glioma model (BT4C), Pgp was demonstrated in capillary endothelial cells of the tumor tissue and surrounding normal brain, but not in tumor cells. The expression of gene transcripts or Pgp was not affected by irradiation. The results indicate that long-lasting verapamil-resistant drug efflux mechanisms are activated in brain endothelial cells after irradiation. The results might explain the poor efficacy of chemotherapy following radiotherapy and contribute to consideration of new treatment strategies in the management of malignant glioma.

  • 37.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Guo, Dongsheng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergenheim, A Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Epidermal growth factor receptor family (EGFR, ErbB2-4) in gliomas and meningiomas2004In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 135-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, ErbB1) correlates with enhanced malignant potential of many human tumor types including glioblastoma multiforme. The significance of EGFR expression in meningiomas is, however, unclear. Reports regarding the other EGFR family members, ErbB2-4, in brain tumors are sparse. In this study, the expression of the EGFR family members was analyzed in relation to various parameters for the clinical importance of these receptors in 44 gliomas and 26 meningiomas. In gliomas, quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR revealed the highest EGFR mRNA expression in high-grade gliomas, while ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA were detected only in a few high-grade gliomas. In contrast, ErbB4 expression was most pronounced in low-grade gliomas. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly higher EGFR protein expression in high-grade gliomas compared to low-grade gliomas (P= 0.004). ErbB2 protein expression was mainly seen in high-grade gliomas. ErbB3 protein expression was low in all gliomas analyzed. ErbB4 protein expression was significantly higher in low-grade gliomas than in high-grade gliomas (P= 0.007). In meningiomas, quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed expression of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB4 mRNA in the majority of the tumors. ErbB3 was detected in only one of the meningiomas analyzed. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated high ErbB2 protein expression in meningiomas. An intriguing observation in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas grade II, was a significantly decreased overall survival for patients with high EGFR protein expression (P= 0.04). The high ErbB4 expression in low-grade compared to high-grade gliomas might suggest that ErbB4 acts as a suppressor of malignant transformation in brain tumors, which is in line with previous studies in other tumor types.

  • 38.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Treatment schedule is of importance when gefitinib is combined with irradiation of glioma and endothelial cells in vitro.2007In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 951-960Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergenheim, A Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Heterogeneity in the expression of markers for drug resistance in brain tumors2004In: Clinical Neuropathology, ISSN 0722-5091, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain tumors, in general, display a multidrug-resistant phenotype. This study evaluated the immunohistochemical expression and distribution of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance protein (MRP1), lung resistance protein (LRP) and O6 methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) in low- and high-grade astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma and in different subgroups of meningioma. The results revealed a marked heterogeneity in the expression and distribution among the analyzed tumors. In astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma, Pgp and MRP1 were observed in the capillary endothelium and in scattered tumor cells, whereas LRP occurred only in tumor cells. A pronounced expression of MGMT was found independent of the histopathological grade. An enhanced expression of MRP1 and LRP in astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma were more often evident in older patients (> 50 years). Survival analysis suggested a markedly decreased overall survival for patients suffering from low-grade glioma overexpressing Pgp. In meningioma, a heterogeneous expression of Pgp, MRP1, LRP and MGMT was seen with the most prominent staining localized to the capillary endothelium. Pgp was significantly more often overexpressed (p < 0.05) in transitional compared to meningothelial meningioma. The marked heterogeneity in the expression suggests that analysis of these factors can be of importance in the selection of individualized chemotherapy, regardless of tumor type.

  • 40.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta
    Hjalmars, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Genetic variants in association studies: review of strengths and weaknesses in study design and current knowledge of impact on cancer risk2009In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 948-954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sequencing of the human genome has recently been completed and mapping of the complete genomic variation is ongoing. During the last decade there has been a huge expansion of studies of genetic variants, both with respect to association studies of disease risk and for studies of genetic factors of prognosis and treatments response, i.e., pharmacogenomics. The use of genetics to predict a patient's risk of disease or treatment response is one step toward an improved personalised prevention and screening modality for the prevention of cancer and treatment selection. The technology and statistical methods for completing whole genome tagging of variants and genome wide association studies has developed rapidly over the last decade. After identifying the genetic loci with the strongest, statistical associations with disease risk, future studies will need to further characterise the genotype-phenotype relationship to provide a biological basis for prevention and treatment decisions according to genetic profile. This review discusses some of the general issues and problems of study design; we also discuss challenges in conducting valid association studies in rare cancers such as paediatric brain tumours, where there is support for genetic susceptibility but difficulties in assembling large sample sizes. The clinical interpretation and implementation of genetic association studies with respect to disease risk and treatment is not yet well defined and remains an important area of future research.

  • 41.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Osterman, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sjöström, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Broholm, Helle
    Christensen, Helle Collatz
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Auvinen, Anssi
    Feychting, Maria
    Lönn, Stefan
    Kiuru, Anne
    Swerdlow, Anthony
    Schoemaker, Minouk
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    MNS16A minisatellite genotypes in relation to risk of glioma and meningioma and to glioblastoma outcome.2009In: International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer, ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 125, no 4, p. 968-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene is upregulated in a majority of malignant tumours. A variable tandem repeat, MNS16A, has been reported to be of functional significance for hTERT expression. Published data on the clinical relevance of MNS16A variants in brain tumours have been contradictory. The present population-based study in the Nordic countries and the United Kingdom evaluated brain-tumour risk and survival in relation to MNS16A minisatellite variants in 648 glioma cases, 473 meningioma cases and 1,359 age, sex and geographically matched controls. By PCR-based genotyping all study subjects with fragments of 240 or 271 bp were judged as having short (S) alleles and subjects with 299 or 331 bp fragments as having long (L) alleles. Relative risk of glioma or meningioma was estimated with logistic regression adjusting for age, sex and country. Overall survival was analysed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and equality of survival distributions using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard ratios. The MNS16A genotype was not associated with risk of occurrence of glioma, glioblastoma (GBM) or meningioma. For GBM there were median survivals of 15.3, 11.0 and 10.7 months for the LL, LS and SS genotypes, respectively; the hazard ratio for having the LS genotype compared with the LL was significantly increased HR 2.44 (1.56-3.82) and having the SS genotype versus the LL was nonsignificantly increased HR 1.46 (0.81-2.61). When comparing the LL versus having one of the potentially functional variants LS and SS, the HR was 2.10 (1.41-3.1). However, functionality was not supported as there was no trend towards increasing HR with number of S alleles. Collected data from our and previous studies regarding both risk and survival for the MNS16A genotypes are contradictory and warrant further investigations.

  • 42.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Schwartzbaum, Judith
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Sjöström, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Liu, Yanhong
    Tsavachidis, Spyros
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Auvinen, Anssi
    Collatz-Laier, Helle
    Feychting, Maria
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Kiuru, Anne
    Lönn, Stefan
    Schoemaker, Minouk J
    Swerdlow, Anthony J
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bondy, Melissa
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    A comprehensive study of the association between the EGFR and ERBB2 genes and glioma risk2010In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 767-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioma is the most common type of adult brain tumor and glioblastoma, its most aggressive form, has a dismal prognosis. Receptor tyrosine kinases such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, ERBB4) family, and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), play a central role in tumor progression. We investigated the genetic variants of EGFR, ERBB2, VEGFR and their ligands, EGF and VEGF on glioma and glioblastoma risk. In addition, we evaluated the association of genetic variants of a newly discovered family of genes known to interact with EGFR: LRIG2 and LRIG3 with glioma and glioblastoma risk. Methods. We analyzed 191 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) capturing all common genetic variation of EGF, EGFR, ERBB2, LRIG2, LRIG3, VEGF and VEGFR2 genes. Material from four case-control studies with 725 glioma patients (329 of who were glioblastoma patients) and their 1 610 controls was used. Haplotype analyses were conducted using SAS/Genetics software. Results. Fourteen of the SNPs were significantly associated with glioma risk at p< 0.05, and 17 of the SNPs were significantly associated with glioblastoma risk at p< 0.05. In addition, we found that one EGFR haplotype was related to increased glioblastoma risk at p=0.009, Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.67 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14, 2.45). The Bonferroni correction made all p-values non-significant. One SNP, rs4947986 next to the intron/exon boundary of exon 7 in EGFR, was validated in an independent data set of 713 glioblastoma and 2 236 controls, [OR] = 1.42 (95% CI: 1.06,1.91). Discussion. Previous studies show that regulation of the EGFR pathway plays a role in glioma progression but the present study is the first to find that certain genotypes of the EGFR gene may be related to glioblastoma risk. Further studies are required to reinvestigate these findings and evaluate the functional significance.

  • 43.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wibom, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Cederquist, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Aradottir, Steina
    Borg, Åke
    Armstrong, Georgina N.
    Shete, Sanjay
    Lau, Ching C.
    Bainbridge, Matthew N.
    Claus, Elizabeth B.
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill
    Lai, Rose
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Houlston, Richard S.
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Bernstein, Jonine L.
    Olson, Sara H.
    Jenkins, Robert B.
    Lachance, Daniel H.
    Wrensch, Margaret
    Davis, Faith G.
    Merrell, Ryan
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Bondy, Melissa L.
    Melin, Beatrice S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 1333-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods: Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer. The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results: We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions: Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes.

  • 44.
    Andersén, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Bäckström, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Dahlquist, Gisela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Engström-Laurent, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hjemdahl, Paul
    Korsgren, Olle
    Olsson, Håkan
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svensk medicinsk forskning behöver inte mer styrning2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 22-23, p. 980-981Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Andreasson, Ellinore
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Do patients benefit from reoperation of progressive glioblastoma?2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 46. Andren, O.
    et al.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Falt, A.
    Ulvskog, E.
    Davidsson, S.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hjalm-Eriksson, M.
    Cabazitaxel followed by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improves time to progression in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC): A randomized, open label, phase III, multicenter trial2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47. Antoniou, Antonis C
    et al.
    Beesley, Jonathan
    McGuffog, Lesley
    Sinilnikova, Olga M
    Healey, Sue
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    Ding, Yuan Chun
    Rebbeck, Timothy R
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N
    Lynch, Henry T
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Ganz, Patricia A
    Tomlinson, Gail
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I
    Couch, Fergus J
    Wang, Xianshu
    Lindor, Noralane M
    Pankratz, Vernon S
    Radice, Paolo
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Peissel, Bernard
    Zaffaroni, Daniela
    Barile, Monica
    Viel, Alessandra
    Allavena, Anna
    Dall'Olio, Valentina
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Szabo, Csilla I
    Zikan, Michal
    Claes, Kathleen
    Poppe, Bruce
    Foretova, Lenka
    Mai, Phuong L
    Greene, Mark H
    Rennert, Gad
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Glendon, Gord
    Ozcelik, Hilmi
    Andrulis, Irene L
    Thomassen, Mads
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Sunde, Lone
    Cruger, Dorthe
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Caligo, Maria
    Friedman, Eitan
    Kaufman, Bella
    Laitman, Yael
    Milgrom, Roni
    Dubrovsky, Maya
    Cohen, Shimrit
    Borg, Åke
    Jernström, Helena
    Lindblom, Annika
    Rantala, Johanna
    Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nathanson, Kate
    Domchek, Susan
    Jakubowska, Ania
    Lubinski, Jan
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Osorio, Ana
    Lasa, Adriana
    Durán, Mercedes
    Tejada, Maria-Isabel
    Godino, Javier
    Benitez, Javier
    Hamann, Ute
    Kriege, Mieke
    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline
    van der Luijt, Rob B
    van Asperen, Christi J
    Devilee, Peter
    Meijers-Heijboer, EJ
    Blok, Marinus J
    Aalfs, Cora M
    Hogervorst, Frans
    Rookus, Matti
    Cook, Margaret
    Oliver, Clare
    Frost, Debra
    Conroy, Don
    Evans, D Gareth
    Lalloo, Fiona
    Pichert, Gabriella
    Davidson, Rosemarie
    Cole, Trevor
    Cook, Jackie
    Paterson, Joan
    Hodgson, Shirley
    Morrison, Patrick J
    Porteous, Mary E
    Walker, Lisa
    Kennedy, M John
    Dorkins, Huw
    Peock, Susan
    Godwin, Andrew K
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    de Pauw, Antoine
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    Bonadona, Valérie
    Lasset, Christine
    Dreyfus, Hélène
    Leroux, Dominique
    Hardouin, Agnès
    Berthet, Pascaline
    Faivre, Laurence
    Loustalot, Catherine
    Noguchi, Tetsuro
    Sobol, Hagay
    Rouleau, Etienne
    Nogues, Catherine
    Frénay, Marc
    Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence
    Hopper, John L
    Daly, Mary B
    Terry, Mary B
    John, Esther M
    Buys, Saundra S
    Yassin, Yosuf
    Miron, Alexander
    Goldgar, David
    Singer, Christian F
    Dressler, Anne Catharina
    Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne
    Pfeiler, Georg
    Hansen, Thomas VO
    Jønson, Lars
    Agnarsson, Bjarni A
    Kirchhoff, Tomas
    Offit, Kenneth
    Devlin, Vincent
    Dutra-Clarke, Ana
    Piedmonte, Marion
    Rodriguez, Gustavo C
    Wakeley, Katie
    Boggess, John F
    Basil, Jack
    Schwartz, Peter E
    Blank, Stephanie V
    Toland, Amanda Ewart
    Montagna, Marco
    Casella, Cinzia
    Imyanitov, Evgeny
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Blanco, Ignacio
    Lazaro, Conxi
    Ramus, Susan J
    Sucheston, Lara
    Karlan, Beth Y
    Gross, Jenny
    Schmutzler, Rita
    Wappenschmidt, Barbara
    Engel, Christoph
    Meindl, Alfons
    Lochmann, Magdalena
    Arnold, Norbert
    Heidemann, Simone
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Niederacher, Dieter
    Sutter, Christian
    Deissler, Helmut
    Gadzicki, Dorothea
    Preisler-Adams, Sabine
    Kast, Karin
    Schönbuchner, Ines
    Caldes, Trinidad
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    Aittomäki, Kristiina
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Simard, Jacques
    Spurdle, Amanda B
    Holland, Helene
    Chen, Xiaoqing
    Platte, Radka
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    Easton, Douglas F
    Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction2010In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 70, no 23, p. 9742-9754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10(-11) - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.

  • 48. Antoniou, Antonis C
    et al.
    Kartsonaki, Christiana
    Sinilnikova, Olga M
    Soucy, Penny
    McGuffog, Lesley
    Healey, Sue
    Lee, Andrew
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Peissel, Bernard
    Zaffaroni, Daniela
    Cattaneo, Elisa
    Barile, Monica
    Pensotti, Valeria
    Pasini, Barbara
    Dolcetti, Riccardo
    Giannini, Giuseppe
    Putignano, Anna Laura
    Varesco, Liliana
    Radice, Paolo
    Mai, Phuong L
    Greene, Mark H
    Andrulis, Irene L
    Glendon, Gord
    Ozcelik, Hilmi
    Thomassen, Mads
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Kruse, Torben A
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Crüger, Dorthe G
    Caligo, Maria A
    Laitman, Yael
    Milgrom, Roni
    Kaufman, Bella
    Paluch-Shimon, Shani
    Friedman, Eitan
    Loman, Niklas
    Harbst, Katja
    Lindblom, Annika
    Arver, Brita
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nathanson, Katherine L
    Domchek, Susan M
    Rebbeck, Timothy
    Jakubowska, Ania
    Lubinski, Jan
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Byrski, Tomasz
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Gorski, Bohdan
    Osorio, Ana
    Ramón y Cajal, Teresa
    Fostira, Florentia
    Andrés, Raquel
    Benitez, Javier
    Hamann, Ute
    Hogervorst, Frans B
    Rookus, Matti A
    Hooning, Maartje J
    Nelen, Marcel R
    van der Luijt, Rob B
    van Os, Theo A M
    van Asperen, Christi J
    Devilee, Peter
    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J
    Garcia, Encarna B Gómez
    Peock, Susan
    Cook, Margaret
    Frost, Debra
    Platte, Radka
    Leyland, Jean
    Evans, D Gareth
    Lalloo, Fiona
    Eeles, Ros
    Izatt, Louise
    Adlard, Julian
    Davidson, Rosemarie
    Eccles, Diana
    Ong, Kai-ren
    Cook, Jackie
    Douglas, Fiona
    Paterson, Joan
    Kennedy, M John
    Miedzybrodzka, Zosia
    Godwin, Andrew
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Buecher, Bruno
    Belotti, Muriel
    Tirapo, Carole
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    Barjhoux, Laure
    Lasset, Christine
    Leroux, Dominique
    Faivre, Laurence
    Bronner, Myriam
    Prieur, Fabienne
    Nogues, Catherine
    Rouleau, Etienne
    Pujol, Pascal
    Coupier, Isabelle
    Frénay, Marc
    Hopper, John L
    Daly, Mary B
    Terry, Mary B
    John, Esther M
    Buys, Saundra S
    Yassin, Yosuf
    Miron, Alexander
    Goldgar, David
    Singer, Christian F
    Tea, Muy-Kheng
    Pfeiler, Georg
    Dressler, Anne Catharina
    Hansen, Thomas v O
    Jønson, Lars
    Ejlertsen, Bent
    Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork
    Kirchhoff, Tomas
    Offit, Kenneth
    Piedmonte, Marion
    Rodriguez, Gustavo
    Small, Laurie
    Boggess, John
    Blank, Stephanie
    Basil, Jack
    Azodi, Masoud
    Toland, Amanda Ewart
    Montagna, Marco
    Tognazzo, Silvia
    Agata, Simona
    Imyanitov, Evgeny
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    Lazaro, Conxi
    Blanco, Ignacio
    Pharoah, Paul D P
    Sucheston, Lara
    Karlan, Beth Y
    Walsh, Christine S
    Olah, Edith
    Bozsik, Aniko
    Teo, Soo-Hwang
    Seldon, Joyce L
    Beattie, Mary S
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J
    Sluiter, Michelle D
    Diez, Orland
    Schmutzler, Rita K
    Wappenschmidt, Barbara
    Engel, Christoph
    Meindl, Alfons
    Ruehl, Ina
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Kast, Karin
    Deissler, Helmut
    Niederacher, Dieter
    Arnold, Norbert
    Gadzicki, Dorothea
    Schönbuchner, Ines
    Caldes, Trinidad
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Aittomäki, Kristiina
    Dumont, Martine
    Chiquette, Jocelyne
    Tischkowitz, Marc
    Chen, Xiaoqing
    Beesley, Jonathan
    Spurdle, Amanda B
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    Chun Ding, Yuan
    Fredericksen, Zachary
    Wang, Xianshu
    Pankratz, Vernon S
    Couch, Fergus
    Simard, Jacques
    Easton, Douglas F
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers2011In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 20, no 16, p. 3304-3321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10(-9) for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10(-8) for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92-1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women.

  • 49. Arason, Adalgeir
    et al.
    Gunnarsson, Haukur
    Johannesdottir, Gudrun
    Jonasson, Kristjan
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Gillanders, Elizabeth M
    Agnarsson, Bjarni A
    Jönsson, Göran
    Pylkäs, Katri
    Mustonen, Aki
    Heikkinen, Tuomas
    Aittomäki, Kristiina
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johannsson, Oskar TH
    Møller, Pål
    Winqvist, Robert
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Borg, Åke
    Barkardottir, Rosa B
    Genome-wide search for breast cancer linkage in large Icelandic non-BRCA1/2 families2010In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. R50-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosomes 2p, 6q and 14q are candidate sites for genes contributing together to high breast cancer risk. A polygenic model is supported, suggesting the joint effect of genes in contributing to breast cancer risk to be rather common in non-BRCA1/2 families. For genetic counselling it would seem important to resolve the mode of genetic interaction.

  • 50. Armstrong, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Anand, Aseem
    Edenbrandt, Lars
    Bondesson, Eva
    Bjartell, Anders
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sternberg, Cora N.
    Pili, Roberto
    Tuvesson, Helen
    Nordle, Örjan
    Carducci, Michael A.
    Morris, Michael J.
    Phase 3 Assessment of the Automated Bone Scan Index as a Prognostic Imaging Biomarker of Overall Survival in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2018In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 944-951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone, and bone metastases are associated with pathologic fractures, pain, and reduced survival. Bone disease is routinely visualized using the technetium Tc 99m(Tc-99m) bone scan; however, the standard interpretation of bone scan data relies on subjective manual assessment of counting metastatic lesion numbers. There is an unmet need for an objective and fully quantitative assessment of bone scan data.

    Objective: To clinically assess in a prospectively defined analysis plan of a clinical trial the automated Bone Scan Index (aBSI) as an independent prognostic determinant of overall survival (OS) in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    Design, Setting, and Participants: This investigationwas a prospectively planned analysis of the aBSI in a phase 3 multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of tasquinimod (10TASQ10). Men with bone metastatic chemotherapy-naive CRPC were recruited at 241 sites in 37 countries between March 2011 and August 2015. The statistical analysis plan to clinically evaluate the aBSI was prospectively defined and locked before unmasking of the 10TASQ10 study. The analysis of aBSI was conducted between May 25, 2016, and June 3, 2017.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: The associations of baseline aBSI with OS, radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS), time to symptomatic progression, and time to opiate use for cancer pain.

    Results: Of the total 1245 men enrolled, 721 were evaluable for the aBSI. The mean (SD) age (available for 719 men) was 70.6 (8.0) years (age range, 47-90 years). The aBSI population was representative of the total study population based on baseline characteristics. The aBSI (median, 1.07; range, 0-32.60) was significantly associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.14-1.26; P < .001). The median OS by aBSI quartile (lowest to highest) was 34.7, 27.3, 21.7, and 13.3 months, respectively. The discriminative ability of the aBSI (C index, 0.63) in prognosticating OS was significantly higher than that of the manual lesion counting (C index, 0.60) (P = .03). In a multivariable survival model, a higher aBSI remained independently associated with OS (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.11; P = .03). A higher aBSI was also independently associated with time to symptomatic progression (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.13-1.23; P < .001) and time to opiate use for cancer pain (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14-1.30; P < .001).

    Conclusions and Relevance: To date, this investigation is the largest prospectively analyzed study to validate the aBSI as an independent prognostic imaging biomarker of survival in mCRPC. These data support the prognostic utility of the aBSI as an objective imaging biomarker in the design and eligibility of clinical trials of systemic therapies for patients with mCRPC.

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