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  • 1.
    Adamo, Hanibal
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Dahl Scherdin, Tove
    Egevad, Lars
    Granfors, Torvald
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBPβ expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of a tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBPβ). To explore this further, we examined C/EBPβ expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors―and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    In rats, C/EBPβ mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBPβ was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBPβ expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, with distance to the tumor, and with tumor cell metastatic capacity.

    In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBPβ in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and a favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBPβ in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, the presence of metastases at diagnosis, and poor outcome. 

  • 2. Adolf, Katja
    et al.
    Wagner, Ludwig
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Ottosen, Peter
    Borre, Michael
    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin
    Orntoft, Torben Falck
    Tørring, Niels
    Secretagogin is a new neuroendocrine marker in the human prostate.2007In: Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, Vol. 67, no 5, 472-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Adolfsson, Jan
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Ahlgren, Göran
    Ahlstrand, Christer
    Andrén, Ove
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Bratt, Ola
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Hellström, Karin
    Hellström, Magnus
    Holmberg, Erik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Hugosson, Jonas
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Petterson, Bill
    Törnblom, Magnus
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Clinical characteristics and primary treatment of prostate cancer in Sweden between 1996 and 2005.2007In: Scand J Urol Nephrol, ISSN 0036-5599, Vol. 41, 456-477 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Ahn, Jiyoung
    et al.
    Schumacher, Fredrick R
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Pfeiffer, Ruth
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Andriole, Gerald L
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Diver, W Ryan
    Feigelson, Heather Spencer
    Gaziano, J Michael
    Giovannucci, Edward
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Henderson, Brian E
    Hoover, Robert N
    Kolonel, Laurence N
    Kraft, Peter
    Ma, Jing
    Le Marchand, Loïc
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Stampfer, Meir
    Stram, Daniel O
    Thomas, Gilles
    Thun, Michael J
    Travis, Ruth C
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Weinstein, Stephanie J
    Yeager, Meredith
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Hunter, David J
    Hayes, Richard B
    Quantitative trait loci predicting circulating sex steroid hormones in men from the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3).2009In: Human molecular genetics, ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 18, no 19, 3749-57 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twin studies suggest a heritable component to circulating sex steroid hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). In the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, 874 SNPs in 37 candidate genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway were examined in relation to circulating levels of SHBG (N = 4720), testosterone (N = 4678), 3 alpha-androstanediol-glucuronide (N = 4767) and 17beta-estradiol (N = 2014) in Caucasian men. rs1799941 in SHBG is highly significantly associated with circulating levels of SHBG (P = 4.52 x 10(-21)), consistent with previous studies, and testosterone (P = 7.54 x 10(-15)), with mean difference of 26.9 and 14.3%, respectively, comparing wild-type to homozygous variant carriers. Further noteworthy novel findings were observed between SNPs in ESR1 with testosterone levels (rs722208, mean difference = 8.8%, P = 7.37 x 10(-6)) and SRD5A2 with 3 alpha-androstanediol-glucuronide (rs2208532, mean difference = 11.8%, P = 1.82 x 10(-6)). Genetic variation in genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway is associated with differences in circulating SHBG and sex steroid hormones.

  • 5. Akre, Olof
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Lambe, Mats
    Bratt, Ola
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Mortality among men with locally advanced prostate cancer managed with noncurative intent: a nationwide study in PCBaSe Sweden2011In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 60, no 3, 554-563 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PCa-specific mortality within 8 yr of diagnosis is high in locally advanced PCa, suggesting undertreatment, particularly among men in older age groups. Our results underscore the need for more studies of treatment with curative intent for locally advanced tumors.

  • 6.
    Alamdari, Farhood Iranparvar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Adrenal metastasis in renal cell carcinoma: a recommendation for adjustment of the TNM staging system.2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 39, no 4, 277-282 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Alamdari, Farhood Iranparvar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Rasmuson, Torgny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Onkologi.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Angiogenesis and other markers for prediction of survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 41, no 1, 5-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Allen, N E
    et al.
    Key, T J
    Appleby, P N
    Travis, R C
    Roddam, A W
    Tjønneland, A
    Johnsen, N F
    Overvad, K
    Linseisen, J
    Rohrmann, S
    Boeing, H
    Pischon, T
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    Kiemeney, L
    Tagliabue, G
    Palli, D
    Vineis, P
    Tumino, R
    Trichopoulou, A
    Kassapa, C
    Trichopoulos, D
    Ardanaz, E
    Larrañaga, N
    Tormo, M-J
    González, C A
    Quirós, J R
    Sánchez, M-J
    Bingham, S
    Khaw, K-T
    Manjer, J
    Berglund, G
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Slimani, N
    Ferrari, P
    Rinaldi, S
    Riboli, E
    Animal foods, protein, calcium and prostate cancer risk: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.2008In: Br J Cancer, ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 98, no 9, 1574-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Allen, Naomi E
    et al.
    Appleby, Paul N
    Key, Timothy J
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    Ros, Martine M
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Roswall, Nina
    Overvad, Kim
    Weikert, Steffen
    Boeing, Heiner
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Teucher, Birgit
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Peeters, Petra
    Quirós, Jose Ramón
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Ehrnström, Roy
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Gram, Inger Torhild
    Parr, Christine L
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Karapetyan, Tina
    Dilis, Vardis
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Fagherrazzi, Guy
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gunter, Marc J
    Riboli, Elio
    Macronutrient intake and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 132, no 3, 635-644 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have suggested that dietary factors may be important in the development of bladder cancer. We examined macronutrient intake in relation to risk of urothelial cell carcinoma among 469,339 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations were examined using Cox regression, stratified by sex, age at recruitment and centre and further adjusted for smoking status and duration, body mass index and total energy intake. After an average of 11.3 years of follow-up, 1,416 new cases of urothelial cell carcinoma were identified. After allowing for measurement error, a 3% increase in the consumption of energy intake from animal protein was associated with a 15% higher risk (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3-30%; p(trend) = 0.01) and a 2% increase in energy from plant protein intake was associated with a 23% lower risk (95% CI: 36-7%, p(trend) = 0.006). Dietary intake of fat, carbohydrate, fibre or calcium was not associated with risk. These findings suggest that animal and/or plant protein may affect the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma, and examination of these associations in other studies is needed.

  • 10. Allen, Naomi E
    et al.
    Appleby, Paul N
    Roddam, Andrew W
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Johnsen, Nina Føns
    Overvad, Kim
    Boeing, Heiner
    Weikert, Steffen
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Misirli, Gesthimani
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Grioni, Sara
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Larrañaga, Nerea
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Agudo, Antonio
    Tormo, María-José
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Slimani, Nadia
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Riboli, Elio
    Key, Timothy J
    Plasma selenium concentration and prostate cancer risk: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).2008In: Am J Clin Nutr, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 88, no 6, 1567-1575 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Allen, Naomi E
    et al.
    Roddam, Andrew W
    Sieri, Sabina
    Boeing, Heiner
    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Vineis, Paolo
    Contiero, Paolo
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Zilis, Demosthenes
    Koumantaki, Yvoni
    Peeters, Petra H
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Rodríguez, Laudina
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, María Dolores
    Esquius, Laura
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wallström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Norat, Teresa
    Mouw, Traci
    Riboli, Elio
    A prospective analysis of the association between macronutrient intake and renal cell carcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.2009In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 125, no 4, 982-987 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous case-control studies have suggested that a high intake of animal foods and its associated nutrients are associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma, although data from prospective studies are limited. We report here on the relationship between macronutrient intake and renal cell carcinoma incidence among 435,293 participants enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of dietary intake of fat, protein, carbohydrate, fiber and cholesterol and risk of renal cell carcinoma adjusted for age, sex, center, height, body mass index, physical activity, education, smoking, menopausal status, alcohol and energy intake. During an average 8.8 years of follow-up, 507 renal cell carcinoma cases occurred. Risk of renal cell carcinoma was not associated with macronutrient intake, including nutrients derived from animal sources. Our results indicate that macronutrient intake is not associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma in this cohort of European men and women. (c) 2009 UICC.

  • 12. Allen, Naomi E.
    et al.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Appleby, Paul N.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Barnett, Matt J.
    Black, Amanda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Deschasaux, Melanie
    Galan, Pilar
    Goodman, Gary E.
    Goodman, Phyllis J.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Heliovaara, Markku
    Helzlsouer, Kathy J.
    Henderson, Brian E.
    Hercberg, Serge
    Knekt, Paul
    Kolonel, Laurence N.
    Lasheras, Christina
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Metter, E. Jeffrey
    Neuhouser, Marian L.
    Olsen, Anja
    Pala, Valeria
    Platz, Elizabeth A.
    Rissanen, Harri
    Reid, Mary E.
    Schenk, Jeannette M.
    Stampfer, Meir J.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Tangen, Catherine M.
    Touvier, Mathilde
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    van den Brandt, Piet A.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Selenium and Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Individual Participant Data From Fifteen Prospective Studies2016In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 108, no 11, djw153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Some observational studies suggest that a higher selenium status is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer but have been generally too small to provide precise estimates of associations, particularly by disease stage and grade. Methods: Collaborating investigators from 15 prospective studies provided individual-participant records (from predominantly men of white European ancestry) on blood or toenail selenium concentrations and prostate cancer risk. Odds ratios of prostate cancer by selenium concentration were estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Blood selenium was not associated with the risk of total prostate cancer (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio [OR] per 80 percentile increase = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83 to 1.23, based on 4527 case patients and 6021 control subjects). However, there was heterogeneity by disease aggressiveness (ie, advanced stage and/or prostate cancer death, P-heterogeneity = .01), with high blood selenium associated with a lower risk of aggressive disease (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.21 to 0.87) but not with nonaggressive disease. Nail selenium was inversely associated with total prostate cancer (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.40, P-trend <.001, based on 1970 case patients and 2086 control subjects), including both nonaggressive (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.50) and aggressive disease (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.11 to 0.31, P-heterogeneity =.08). Conclusions: Nail, but not blood, selenium concentration is inversely associated with risk of total prostate cancer, possibly because nails are a more reliable marker of long-term selenium exposure. Both blood and nail selenium concentrations are associated with a reduced risk of aggressive disease, which warrants further investigation.

  • 13.
    Alm, Ronja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Preoperative serum C-reactive protein (CRP) as a predictor of survival in urothelial muscle invasive bladder cancer in relation to neoadjuvant chemotherapy: A retrospective multi-center study2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 14. Almquist, Martin
    et al.
    Johansen, Dorthe
    Björge, Tone
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Lindkvist, Björn
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Engeland, Anders
    Rapp, Kilian
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Selmer, Randi
    Diem, Guenter
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Tretli, Steinar
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Metabolic factors and risk of thyroid cancer in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can)2011In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 22, no 5, 743-751 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  To investigate metabolic factors and their possible impact on risk of thyroid cancer. Methods  A prospective cohort study was conducted based on seven population-based cohorts in Norway, Austria, and Sweden, in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can). Altogether 578,700 men and women with a mean age of 44.0 years at baseline were followed for on average 12.0 years. Relative risk of incident thyroid cancer was assessed by levels of BMI, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and by a combined metabolic syndrome (MetS) score. Risk estimates were investigated for quintiles, and a z score distribution of exposures was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results  During follow-up, 255 women and 133 men were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. In women, there was an inverse association between glucose and thyroid cancer risk, with adjusted RR: 95% CI was 0.61 (0.41–0.90), p trend = 0.02 in the fifth versus the first quintile, and a positive association between BMI and thyroid cancer risk with a significant trend over quintiles. There was no association between the other metabolic factors, single or combined (Met-S), and thyroid cancer. Conclusion  In women, BMI was positively, while blood glucose levels were inversely, associated with thyroid cancer.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Hexaminolevulinate-guided bladder tumor resection: impact on survival after radical cystectomy for muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer: A retrospective multi-center study2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 16.
    Andréasson, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Regulatory T cells and Urinary BladderCancer. Characterization of Regulatory T cells in Peripheral Blood ofPatients with Muscle Invasive Urinary Bladder Cancer.2015Student thesis
  • 17. Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z.
    et al.
    Ängquist, Lars
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases, Genetic Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jakobsen, Marianne U.
    Overvad, Kim
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Saris, Wim H. M.
    Astrup, Arne
    Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Body characteristics, dietary protein and body weight regulation. Reconciling conflicting results from intervention and observational studies?2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 7, e101134- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives: Physiological evidence indicates that high-protein diets reduce caloric intake and increase thermogenic response, which may prevent weight gain and regain after weight loss. Clinical trials have shown such effects, whereas observational cohort studies suggest an association between greater protein intake and weight gain. In both types of studies the results are based on average weight changes, and show considerable diversity in both directions. This study investigates whether the discrepancy in the evidence could be due to recruitment of overweight and obese individuals into clinical trials. Subjects/Methods: Data were available from the European Diet, Obesity and Genes (DiOGenes) post-weight-loss weight-maintenance trial and the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health (DCH) cohort. Participants of the DCH cohort were matched with participants from the DiOGenes trial on gender, diet, and body characteristics. Different subsets of the DCH-participants, comparable with the trial participants, were analyzed for weight maintenance according to the randomization status (high or low protein) of the matched trial participants. Results: Trial participants were generally heavier, had larger waist circumference and larger fat mass than the participants in the entire DCH cohort. A better weight maintenance in the high-protein group compared to the low protein group was observed in the subgroups of the DCH cohort matching body characteristics of the trial participants. Conclusion: This modified observational study, minimized the differences between the RCT and observational data with regard to dietary intake, participant characteristics and statistical analysis. Compared with low protein diet the high protein diet was associated with better weight maintenance when individuals with greater body mass index and waist circumference were analyzed. Selecting subsets of large-scale observational cohort studies with similar characteristics as participants in clinical trials may reconcile the otherwise conflicting results.

  • 18. Anttila, Tarja
    et al.
    Tenkanen, Leena
    Lumme, Sonja
    Leinonen, Maija
    Gislefoss, Randi Elin
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Thoresen, Steinar
    Hakulinen, Timo
    Luostarinen, Tapio
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Urologi och andrologi.
    Saikku, Pekka
    Dillner, Joakim
    Lehtinen, Matti
    Hakama, Matti
    Chlamydial antibodies and risk of prostate cancer.2005In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, Vol. 14, no 2, 385-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Moller, Henrik
    Garmo, Hans
    Holmberg, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Hakan
    Lambe, Mats
    Hammar, Niklas
    Walldius, Göran
    Robinson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories2016In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, no 6, 1307-1318 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA<4 mu g/L, while those with glucose levels of 5.6-6.9 mmol/L had a greater odds of PSA>20 mu g/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 mu g/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 mu g/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate-and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.

  • 20. Bahi, R.
    et al.
    Pignot, G.
    Hammoudi, Y.
    Bensalah, K.
    Oger, E.
    Laguna, P.
    Barwari, K.
    Bessede, T.
    Rigaud, J.
    Roupret, M.
    Bernhard, J. C.
    Long, J. A.
    Zisman, A.
    Berger, J.
    Paparel, P.
    Lechevallier, E.
    Bertini, R.
    Salomon, L.
    Bex, A.
    Farfara, R.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Rodriguez, A. R.
    Patard, J. J.
    Ischemia is not an independent predictive factor of chronic renal failure after partial nephrectomy in a solitary kidney in patients without pre-operative renal insufficiency2015In: Progrès en urologie (Paris), ISSN 1166-7087, Vol. 25, no 1, 27-33 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the influence of vascular clamping and ischemia time on long-term post-operative renal function following partial nephrectomy (PN) for cancer in a solitary kidney.

    Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study including 259 patients managed by PN between 1979 and 2010 in 13 centers. Clamping use, technique choice (pedicular or parenchymal clamping), ischemia time, and peri-operative data were collected. Pre-operative and last follow-up glomerular filtration rates were compared. A multivariate analysis using a Cox model was performed to assess the impact of ischemia on post-operative chronic renal failure risk.

    Results: Mean tumor size was 4.0 ± 2.3 cm and mean pre-operative glomerular filtration rate was 60.8 ± 18.9 mL/min. One hundred and six patients were managed with warm ischemia (40.9%) and 53 patients with cold ischemia (20.5%). Thirty patients (11.6%) have had a chronic kidney disease. In multivariate analysis, neither vascular clamping (P = 0.44) nor warm ischemia time (P = 0.1) were associated with a pejorative evolution of renal function. Pre-operative glomerular filtration rate (P < 0.0001) and blood loss volume (P = 0.02) were significant independent predictive factors of long-term renal failure.

    Conclusion: Renal function following PN in a solitary kidney seems to depend on non-reversible factors such as pre-operative glomerular filtration rate. Our findings minimize the role of vascular clamping and ischemia time, which were not significantly associated with chronic renal failure risk in our study.

  • 21.
    Bejmar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Assessment of Metformin-medication as a factor affecting survival in bladder cancer – a multicenter evaluation: – a multicenter evaluation2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 22. Bekema, Hendrika J.
    et al.
    MacLennan, Steven
    Imamura, Mari
    Lam, Thomas B. L.
    Stewart, Fiona
    Scott, Neil
    MacLennan, Graeme
    McClinton, Sam
    Griffiths, T. R. Leyshon
    Skolarikos, Andreas
    MacLennan, Sara J.
    Sylvester, Richard
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    N'Dow, James
    Systematic Review of Adrenalectomy and Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma2013In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 64, no 5, 799-810 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Controversy remains over whether adrenalectomy and lymph node dissection (LND) should be performed concomitantly with radical nephrectomy (RN) for locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cT3-T4N0M0. Objective: To systematically review all relevant literature comparing oncologic, perioperative, and quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes for locally advanced RCC managed with RN with or without concomitant adrenalectomy or LND.

    Evidence acquisition: Relevant databases were searched up to August 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative studies were included. Outcome measures were overall survival, QoL, and perioperative adverse effects. Risks of bias (RoB) were assessed using Cochrane RoB tools. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach.

    Evidence synthesis: A total of 3658 abstracts and 252 full-text articles were screened. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria: six LNDs (one RCT and five nonrandomised studies [NRSs]) and two adrenalectomies (two NRSs). RoB was high across the evidence base, and the quality of evidence from outcomes ranged from moderate to very low. Meta-analyses were not undertaken because of diverse study designs and data heterogeneity. There was no significant difference in survival between the groups, even though 5-yr overall survival appears better for the RN plus LND group compared with the no-LND group in one randomised study. There was no evidence of a difference in adverse events between the RN plus LND and no-LND groups. No studies reported QoL outcomes. There was no evidence of an oncologic difference between the RN with adrenalectomy and RN without adrenalectomy groups. No studies reported adverse events or QoL outcomes.

    Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to draw any conclusions on oncologic outcomes for patients having concomitant LND or ipsilateral adrenalectomy compared with patients having RN alone for cT3-T4N0M0 RCC. The quality of evidence is generally low and the results potentially biased. Further research in adequately powered trials is needed to answer these questions.

  • 23. Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Robinson, David
    Tishelman, Carol
    Holmberg, Lars
    Bratt, Ola
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lambe, Mats
    Differences according to socioeconomic status in the management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer2012In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 48, no 1, 75-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Outcomes for many cancer forms are associated with socioeconomic status (SES).We investigated if SES was associated with management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer.

    Material and methods: A nation-wide population-based cohort in Prostate Cancer Data Base Sweden (PCBaSe), a merged database including data on incident prostate cancer identified in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) between 1997 and 2006. High risk PCa was defined as T3 tumour, and/or Gleason score 8–10 and/or PSA 20–50 ng/mL. Use of bone scan, curative treatment, and mortality in relation to SES was assessed by logistic, Cox, and competing risk regression with hazard ratios (HR), sub-distributed HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for co-morbidity, age, calendar period and clinical subgroups.

    Results: Amongst 17,522 high risk prostate cancer patients, a bone scan was more often performed in higher white-collar than in blue-collar workers (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.21–1.40). Amongst men without metastases, the likelihood of intention to treat was higher in higher white-collar workers (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.28–1.57). In men who received curative treatment, the likelihood was higher to undergo radical prostatectomy for higher white-collar patients (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.10–1.47). In men without metastases, not only overall mortality was lower amongst higher white-collar workers (HR, 0.76; 95% CI 0.60–0.97), but also prostate cancer-specific mortality (sHR 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49–0.99).

    Conclusions: We conclude that socioeconomic disparities in the management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer exist also within the setting of a National Health Care System aiming to provide care on equal terms to all residents.

  • 24. Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Tishelman, Carol
    Holmberg, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lambe, Mats
    Comorbidity, treatment and mortality: a population based cohort study of prostate cancer in PCBaSe Sweden2011In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 185, no 3, 833-840 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    We examined associations among comorbidity, treatment decisions and mortality in patients with prostate cancer.

    Materials and Methods

    A total of 77,536 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1997 and 2006 were identified in PCBaSe Sweden from the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden. Logistic, Cox and competing risk regression were used to assess associations among Charlson comorbidity index, treatment and mortality. The Charlson comorbidity index was categorized into no (0), mild (1) and severe comorbidity (2+).

    Results

    In men with low risk prostate cancer 5,975 of the 13,245 (45.1%) patients without comorbidity underwent radical prostatectomy compared to 256 of the 1,399 (18.9%) men with severe comorbidity. Following adjustment for age and period of diagnosis, radical prostatectomy was less likely to be offered to men with severe comorbidity (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.41–0.55). In men with high risk prostate cancer, radiotherapy was more common (range 7.7% to 21.3%) than radical prostatectomy (range 3.0% to 11.2%) regardless of comorbidity burden. All cause and competing cause but not prostate cancer specific mortality were increased in men with severe comorbidity (all cause HR 1.99, 95% CI 1.93–2.05; competing cause sHR 2.66, 95% CI 2.56–2.78; prostate cancer specific sHR 0.98, 95% CI 0.93–1.03). The cumulative probability of prostate cancer death given no death from competing causes was significantly higher in men with severe comorbidity in all risk groups (p <0.01).

    Conclusions

    Comorbidity affects treatment choices, and is associated with all cause, competing cause and conditional prostate cancer specific mortality. An increased conditional prostate cancer specific mortality in men with severe comorbidity may reflect less aggressive treatment, impaired tumor defense, lifestyle factors and poor general health behavior.

  • 25.
    Bergman, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Studies on patients with ileal conduit diversion with special regard to renal infection1978Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The conditions for retrograde transport of urine and thereby bacteria in the urinary svstem of diverted patients (device and urinary tract) were studied with roentgeno­logical technigue. Back-flow from the urinary collecting device into the conduit occurred in a fifth of those patients who had a flat stoma. A nipple stoma of at least 2 cm height resisted back-flow better than any flat stoma.

    Ureteral reflux occurred to approximately 30 % of the ureters, both in the supine and erect body positions.The intraluminal pressure in the conduit was "low"

    (^12 cm H2O) in approximately 30 % when reflux occurred.

    The autopsy study showed a higher frequency of renal infections in diverted patients than in non-diverted controls. 5 of 11 patients who died more than 2 months after diversion, and without cancer at autopsy, were attributed to death from renal infection.

    There was a relationship between urographical abnormalities, recognized as associated with pyelonephritis, and raised serum antibody titers against E.coli and/or P.mirabilis.

    Most of the ”not normal" renal units deteriorated after the diversion operation.

    The variable "kidney area" was found to be "small" in a higher frequency after a long postoperative period than after a short one.

    Raised -serum antibody titers occurred in 35 % of the patients and were correlated to growth of the corresponding bacteria (E.coli and P.mirabilisrespectively) in the conduit urine. The frequency of raised antibody titers increased with the time after the diversion operation. After treatment with antibiotics of patients with bacteriuria and raised serum antibody titers, the titers were within normal limits («£512), or decreased significantly, in 22 of 25 patients. Serum antibody titer determinations against E.coli and P.mirabilisare suggested as complement to urinary cultures in the follow-up of diverted patients.

    The residual urine volume in the conduit was shown to be of importance for bacteriuria and raised titer against P.mirabilis.

    Some measures, which possibly may reduce bacteriuria and thereby pyelonephritis, are suggested. A nipple stoma of at least 2 cm height ought to be constructed at the operation. To obtain a low residual urine volume the conduit should be short and unobstructed. The urinary collecting device should be emptied often and connected to a uribag during the night.

  • 26. Bergman, Emma Ahlen
    et al.
    Hartana, Ciputra Adijaya
    Linton, Ludvig
    Winerdal, Malin E.
    Krantz, David
    Rosenblatt, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lundgren, Christian
    Marits, Per
    Sherif, Amir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Epigenetic methylation profiles of CD4 T cell signature loci from patients with urinary bladder cancer2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, 264-264 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27. Berndt, Sonja I
    et al.
    Sampson, Joshua
    Yeager, Meredith
    Jacobs, Kevin B
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Hutchinson, Amy
    Chung, Charles
    Orr, Nick
    Wacholder, Sholom
    Chatterjee, Nilanjan
    Yu, Kai
    Kraft, Peter
    Feigelson, Heather Spencer
    Thun, Michael J
    Diver, W Ryan
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Weinstein, Stephanie
    Schumacher, Fredrick R
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Cussenot, Olivier
    Valeri, Antoine
    Andriole, Gerald L
    Crawford, E David
    Haiman, Christopher
    Henderson, Brian
    Kolonel, Laurence
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Siddiq, Afshan
    Riboli, Elio
    Travis, Ruth C
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Isaacs, William
    Isaacs, Sarah
    Wiley, Kathleen E
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Xu, Jianfeng
    Zheng, S Lilly
    Sun, Jielin
    Vatten, Lars J
    Hveem, Kristian
    Njølstad, Inger
    Gerhard, Daniela S
    Tucker, Margaret
    Hayes, Richard B
    Hoover, Robert N
    Fraumeni, Joseph F
    Hunter, David J
    Thomas, Gilles
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Large-scale fine mapping of the HNF1B locus and prostate cancer risk2011In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 20, no 16, 3322-3329 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous genome-wide association studies have identified two independent variants in HNF1B as susceptibility loci for prostate cancer risk. To fine-map common genetic variation in this region, we genotyped 79 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 17q12 region harboring HNF1B in 10 272 prostate cancer cases and 9123 controls of European ancestry from 10 case-control studies as part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. Ten SNPs were significantly related to prostate cancer risk at a genome-wide significance level of P < 5 × 10(-8) with the most significant association with rs4430796 (P = 1.62 × 10(-24)). However, risk within this first locus was not entirely explained by rs4430796. Although modestly correlated (r(2)= 0.64), rs7405696 was also associated with risk (P = 9.35 × 10(-23)) even after adjustment for rs4430769 (P = 0.007). As expected, rs11649743 was related to prostate cancer risk (P = 3.54 × 10(-8)); however, the association within this second locus was stronger for rs4794758 (P = 4.95 × 10(-10)), which explained all of the risk observed with rs11649743 when both SNPs were included in the same model (P = 0.32 for rs11649743; P = 0.002 for rs4794758). Sequential conditional analyses indicated that five SNPs (rs4430796, rs7405696, rs4794758, rs1016990 and rs3094509) together comprise the best model for risk in this region. This study demonstrates a complex relationship between variants in the HNF1B region and prostate cancer risk. Further studies are needed to investigate the biological basis of the association of variants in 17q12 with prostate cancer.

  • 28. Bex, Axel
    et al.
    Albiges, Laurence
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Bensalah, Karim
    Dabestani, Saeed
    Giles, Rachel H.
    Hofmann, Fabian
    Hora, Milan
    Kuczyk, Markus A.
    Lam, Thomas B.
    Marconi, Lorenzo
    Merseburger, Axel S.
    Staehler, Michael
    Volpe, Alessandro
    Powles, Thomas
    Updated European Association of Urology Guidelines Regarding Adjuvant Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma2017In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 71, no 5, 719-722 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Association of Urology Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) guidelines panel updated their recommendation on adjuvant therapy in unfavourable, clinically nonmetastatic RCC following the recently reported results of a second randomised controlled phase 3 trial comparing 1-yr sunitinib to placebo for high-risk RCC after nephrectomy (S-TRAC). On the basis of conflicting results from the two available studies, the panel rated the quality of the evidence, the harm-to-benefit ratio, patient preferences, and costs. Finally, the panel, including representatives from a patient advocate group (International Kidney Cancer Coalition) voted and reached a consensus to not recommend adjuvant therapy with sunitinib for patients with high-risk RCC after nephrectomy. Patient summary: In two studies, sunitinib was given for 1 yr and compared to no active treatment (placebo) in patients who had their kidney tumour removed and who had a high risk of cancer coming back after surgery. Although one study demonstrated that 1 yr of sunitinib therapy resulted in a 1.2-yr longer time before the disease recurred, the other study did not show a benefit and it has not been shown that patients live longer. Despite having been diagnosed with high-risk disease, many patients remain without recurrence, and the side effects of sunitinib are high. Therefore, the panel members, including patient representatives, do not recommend sunitinib after tumour removal in these patients.

  • 29. Bex, Axel
    et al.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Comparing Everolimus to Sunitinib in Non-clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma2016In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 69, no 5, 875-876 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Bex, Axel
    et al.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    van Poppel, Hein
    Powles, Thomas
    The Role of Cytoreductive Nephrectomy: European Association of Urology Recommendations in 20162016In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 70, no 6, 901-905 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient summary: After the introduction of systemic targeted therapies, the use of nephrectomy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has declined. Currently, systemic therapy is offered to more patients first as a means to select those candidates that will likely benefit from removal of their primary tumour. Although studies consistently demonstrate a survival benefit after nephrectomy, most patients with poor risk metastatic disease are unlikely to benefit from surgery. Soon studies will report on the effect of nephrectomy in patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis.

  • 31. Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Lambe, Mats
    Bratt, Ola
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Nyberg, Ullakarin
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Suicide risk in men with prostate-specific antigen-detected early prostate cancer: a nationwide population-based cohort study from PCBaSe Sweden.2010In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 57, no 3, 390-395 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The risk of suicide is increased among cancer patients including men with prostate cancer (PCa). However, whether this increased risk applies to men diagnosed subsequent to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is not known. OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of suicide among men diagnosed with PCa subsequent to PSA testing. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Prostate Cancer Base Sweden (PCBaSe Sweden) database, the Swedish Cause of Death Register, and the Swedish census database were used. The PCBaSe Sweden is a merged database that includes data from the Swedish National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) for cases diagnosed between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2006. The number of suicides registered for cases in the PCBaSe cohort was compared with the expected number of suicides in an age-matched general male Swedish population. MEASUREMENTS: Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for different categories of cases. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: There were 128 suicides among the 77,439 PCa cases in the NPCR compared with an expected number of 85 (SMR: 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8). The risk of suicide was not increased for the 22,405 men with PSA-detected T1c tumours (SMR: 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.5), whereas the 22,929 men with locally advanced nonmetastatic tumours (SMR: 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-2.9) and the 8350 men with distant metastases (SMR: 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.6) had statistically significant increased SMRs for suicide. Potential effects of comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions could not be investigated. CONCLUSIONS: No increased risk of committing suicide was observed among men with PCa diagnosed subsequent to PSA testing, whereas the risk was twice as high among men with locally advanced or metastatic disease, compared with an age-matched male population.

  • 32. Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Nyberg, Ullakarin
    Lambe, Mats
    Bratt, Ola
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Psychiatric treatment in men with prostate cancer: results from a Nation-wide, population-based cohort study from PCBaSe Sweden.2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, no 14, 2195-201 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore whether the self-reported psychological distress among men with prostate cancer was to the extent that it required psychiatric treatment.

    Methods: PCBaSe Sweden, a merged database based on the National Prostate Cancer Register including 97% of allprostate cancers registered as well as age-matched controls. We calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals to compare risks of psychiatric treatment due to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disordercontrolling for age and socio-economic factors. We used odds ratios to compare use or no use of antidepressants.

    Findings: In total 72,613 men with prostate cancer and 217,839 men without prostate cancer were included for analyses. Psychiatric hospitalisation due to depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder were significantly increased (RR 1.29, (95% CI 1.14–1.45), RR 1.42 (95% CI 1.12–1.80) and RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.16–2.24), respectively). However, hospitalisations due to anxiety were only increased in men with more advanced tumours RR 2.28 (95% CI 1.45–3.57). The use of antidepressants was increased for all men with prostate cancer RR 1.65 (95% CI 1.54–1.77) and treatment strategies RR 1.93 (95% CI 1.75–2.13).

    Interpretation: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer had increased risk of psychiatric treatment for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and use of antidepressants regardless of risk group and treatment strategy compared to age-matched controls, whilst more advanced prostate cancer was associated with severe anxiety disorders.

  • 33. Bjartell, Anders
    et al.
    Bottai, Matteo
    Persson, Josefin
    Bratt, Ola
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Akre, Olof
    Prediction of clinical progression after radical prostatectomy in a nationwide population-based cohort2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 4, 255-259 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to create a model for predicting progression-free survival after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: The risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) was modelled in a cohort of 3452 men aged 70 years or younger who were primarily treated with radical prostatectomy after being diagnosed between 2003 and 2006 with localized prostate cancer [clinical stage T1c-T2, Gleason score 5-10, N0/NX, M0/MX, prostate-specific antigen (PSA)<20 ng/ml]. The cohort was split into two: one cohort for model development (n = 3452) and one for validation (n = 1762). BCR was defined as two increasing PSA values of at least 0.2 ng/ml, initiation of secondary therapy, distant metastases or death from prostate cancer. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was applied, predictive performance was assessed using the bootstrap resampling technique to calculate the c index, and calibration of the model was evaluated by comparing predicted and observed Kaplan-Meier 1 year BCR. Results: The overall 5 year progression-free survival was 83% after a median follow-up time of 6.8 years in the development cohort and 7.3 years in the validation cohort. The final model included T stage, PSA level, primary and secondary Gleason grade, and number of positive and negative biopsies. The c index for discrimination between high and low risk of recurrence was 0.68. The probability of progression-free survival ranged from 22% to 97% over the range of risk scores in the study population. Conclusions: This model is based on nationwide population-based data and can be used with a fair predictive accuracy to guide decisions on clinical follow-up after prostatectomy. An online calculator for convenient clinical use of the model is available at www.npcr.se/nomogram

  • 34. Björklund, Johan
    et al.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Cole, Alexander
    Carlsson, Stefan
    Robinson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Urology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Loeb, Stacy
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Akre, Olof
    Postoperative mortality 90 days after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and retropubic radical prostatectomy: a nationwide population-based study2016In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 118, no 2, 302-306 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess 90-day postoperative mortality after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) and retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) using nationwide population-based registry data. Patients and Methods We conducted a cohort study using the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden, including 22 344 men with localized prostate cancer of clinical stage T1-T3, whose prostate-specific antigen levels were <50 mu g/mL and who had undergone primary radical prostatectomy in the period 1998-2012. Vital status was ascertained through the Total Population Register. The rates for 90-day postoperative mortality were analysed using logistic regression analysis, and comparisons of 90-day mortality with the background population were made using standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Results Of the 14 820 men who underwent RRP, 29 (0.20%) died, and of the 7 524 men who underwent RARP, 10 (0.13%) died. Mortality in the cohort during the 90-day postoperative period was lower than in an age-matched background population: SMR 0.57 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.75). There was no statistically significant difference in 90-day mortality according to surgical method: RARP vs RRP odds ratio (OR) 1.14; 95% CI 0.46-2.81. Postoperative 90-day mortality decreased over time: 2008-2012 vs 1998-2007 OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.21-0.95, mainly because of lower mortality after RARP. Conclusion The 90-day postoperative mortality rates were low after RARP and RRP and there was no statistically significant difference between the methods. Given the long life expectancy among men with low-and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, very low postoperative mortality is a prerequisite for RP, which was fulfilled by both RRP and RARP. The selection of healthy men for RP is highlighted by the lower 90-day mortality after RP compared with the background population.

  • 35.
    Bjørge, Tone
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tretli, Steinar
    Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Populationbased Cancer Research, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Department of Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Selmer, Randi
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo/Bergen, Norway.
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Institute of Empidemiology, Ulm Univesity, Ulm, Germany.
    Almquist, Martin
    Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Concin, Hans
    Agency for Preventive and Social Medicine, Bregenz, Austria.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Engeland, Anders
    Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Metabolic syndrome and breast cancer in the me-can (metabolic syndrome and cancer) project.2010In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 19, no 7, 1737-1745 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have assessed the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as an entity in relation to breast cancer risk, and results have been inconsistent. We aimed to examine the association between MetS factors (individually and combined) and risk of breast cancer incidence and mortality. METHODS: Two hundred ninety thousand women from Austria, Norway, and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, and levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Relative risks (RR) of breast cancer were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression for each MetS factor in quintiles and for standardized levels (z-scores) and for a composite z-score for the MetS. RESULTS: There were 4,862 incident cases of breast cancer and 633 deaths from breast cancer identified. In women below age 50, there was a decreased risk of incident cancer for the MetS (per 1-unit increment of z-score; RR, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.90) as well as for the individual factors (except for glucose). The lowest risks were seen among the heaviest women. In women above age 60, there was an increased risk of breast cancer mortality for the MetS (RR, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.45) and for blood pressure and glucose. The strongest association with mortality was seen for increased glucose concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: The MetS was associated with a decreased risk of incident breast cancer in women below age 50 with high body mass index, and with an increased risk of breast cancer mortality in women above 60. IMPACT: Lifestyle interventions as recommended for cardiovascular disease prevention may be of value to prevent breast cancer mortality in postmenopausal women.

  • 36. Bjørge, Tone
    et al.
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Tretli, Steinar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Selmer, Randi
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Almquist, Martin
    Concin, Hans
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. null.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. null.
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. null.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. null.
    Engeland, Anders
    null.
    Metabolic risk factors and ovarian cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project2011In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 40, no 6, 1667-1677 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: No studies have so far evaluated the impact of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as an entity on ovarian cancer risk. The authors aimed to examine the association between factors in the MetS, individually and combined, and risk of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality. METHODS: Altogether, 290 000 women from Austria, Norway and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements taken of height, weight, blood pressure and levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. Relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer were estimated using Cox regression for each MetS factor in quintiles and for standardized levels (z-scores), and for a composite z-score for the MetS. RRs were corrected for random error in measurements. RESULTS: During follow-up, 644 epithelial ovarian cancers and 388 deaths from ovarian cancer were identified. There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. Increasing levels of cholesterol [RR 1.52, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01-2.29, per 1-U increment of z-score] and blood pressure (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.12-2.86) conferred, however, increased risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. In women below the age of 50 years, there was increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality for MetS (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.00-2.30). Increasing levels of BMI (RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.37) conferred increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years. CONCLUSION: There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. However, increasing levels of cholesterol and blood pressure increased the risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. Increasing levels of BMI conferred an increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years.

  • 37. Bjørge, Tone
    et al.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Tretli, Steinar
    Selmer, Randi
    Manjer, Jonas
    Rapp, Kilian
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Almquist, Martin
    Concin, Hans
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Engeland, Anders
    Metabolic syndrome and endometrial carcinoma2010In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 171, no 8, 892-902 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examined the association between the metabolic syndrome and risk of incident endometrial and fatal uterine corpus cancer within a large prospective cohort study. Approximately 290,000 women from Austria, Norway, and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements of height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and circulating levels of glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Relative risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. The metabolic syndrome was assessed as a composite z score, as the standardized sum of z scores for body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. A total of 917 endometrial carcinomas and 129 fatal cancers were identified. Increased risks of incident endometrial carcinoma and fatal uterine corpus cancer were seen for the metabolic syndrome factors combined, as well as for individual factors (except for cholesterol). The relative risk of endometrial carcinoma for the metabolic syndrome was 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.28, 1.46) per 1-unit increment of z score. The positive associations between metabolic syndrome factors (both individually and combined) and endometrial carcinoma were confined to the heaviest women. The association between the metabolic syndrome and endometrial carcinoma risk seems to go beyond the risk conferred by obesity alone, particularly in women with a high body mass index.

  • 38.
    Blind, Per Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bläckberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological chemistry.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Carboxylic ester hydrolase: a serum marker of acute pancreatitis1987In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 2, no 5, 597-603 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we established serum reference values of carboxylic ester hydrolase, a pancreatic secretory lipolytic enzyme, and explored to see if a raised serum level is indicative of acute pancreatitis. Postoperative elevation of carboxylic ester hydrolase was observed in seven out of ten patients who underwent pancreatic surgery. Serum levels of carboxylic ester hydrolase and amylase were determined in 129 patients admitted due to abdominal emergency conditions. Amylase was elevated in 27 patients, and in 20 of these raised carboxylic ester hydrolase levels affirmed the diagnosis acute pancreatitis. In five out of the seven patients with elevated amylase alone no etiologic factor of acute pancreatitis was found. Another 11 patients had raised carboxylic ester hydrolase levels without concomitant elevation of amylase. In all these patients, a likely cause of pancreatic inflammation was identifiable. Hence, a raised carboxylic ester hydrolase level, even in presence of normal amylase, could be indicative of acute pancreatic inflammation.

  • 39. Bonn, S. E.
    et al.
    Wiklund, F.
    Sjölander, A.
    Szulkin, R.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Holmberg, E.
    Grönberg, H.
    Bälter, K.
    Body Mass Index and Weight Change in Men with Prostate Cancer: Progression and Mortality2015In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 44, 141-142 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40. Bonn, Stephanie E.
    et al.
    Sjölander, Arvid
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Bälter, Katarina
    Physical Activity and Survival among Men Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 24, no 1, 57-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have investigated the association between post-diagnosis physical activity and mortality among men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis on both overall and prostate cancer-specific mortality in a large cohort. Methods: Data from 4,623 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer 1997-2002 and followed-up until 2012 were analyzed. HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association between post-diagnosis recreational MET-h/d, time spent walking/bicycling, performing household work or exercising, and time to overall and prostate cancer-specific death. All models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results: During the follow-up, 561 deaths of any cause and 194 deaths from prostate cancer occurred. Statistically significantly lower overall mortality rates were found among men engaged in 5 recreationalMET-h/d (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.52-0.77), walking/ bicycling 20 min/d (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57-0.86), performing householdwork > 1 h/d (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.59-0.86), or exercising > 1 h/wk (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.61-0.90), compared with less active men within each activity type. For prostate cancer-specific mortality, statistically significantly lower mortality rates were seen among men walking/bicycling >= 20 min/d (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43-0.87) or exercising 1 h/wk (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48-0.94). Conclusions: Higher levels of physical activity were associated with reduced rates of overall and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Impact: Our study further strengthens previous results indicating beneficial effects of physical activity on survival among men with prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(1); 57-64.

  • 41. Bonn, Stephanie E.
    et al.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Sjölander, Arvid
    Szulkin, Robert
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Bälter, Katarina
    Body mass index and weight change in men with prostate cancer: progression and mortality2014In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 25, no 8, 933-943 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body mass index (BMI) is a modifiable lifestyle factor that has been associated with an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer and biochemical recurrence. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the exposure BMI at the time of a prostate cancer diagnosis and weight change after diagnosis, and the outcomes of prostate cancer progression and mortality in a large cohort study. Data from 4,376 men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer between 1997 and 2002 were analyzed. BMI and weight change were self-reported in 2007. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated in complete-case analysis (n = 3,214) using Cox proportional hazards models. Progression was experienced among 639 (14.6 %) of the study participants, and in total, 450 (10.3 %) deaths of any cause and 134 (3.1 %) prostate cancer-specific deaths were recorded during follow-up. Obese men had a 47 % increased rate of overall mortality compared to normal weight men (HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.03-2.10). No statistically significant associations were found for BMI and prostate cancer progression or prostate cancer-specific mortality. A weight loss > 5 % after diagnosis almost doubled the rate of overall mortality compared to maintaining a stable weight (HR 1.94, 95 % CI 1.41-2.66), while a weight gain > 5 % was associated with an almost doubled increased rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality (HR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.18-3.16). Being obese was associated with an increased rate of overall mortality, and gaining weight after a prostate cancer diagnosis was associated with an increased rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality.

  • 42. Borena, Wegene
    et al.
    Edlinger, Michael
    Bjørge, Tone
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Lindkvist, Björn
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Engeland, Anders
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Strohmaier, Susanne
    Manjer, Jonas
    Selmer, Randi
    Tretli, Steinar
    Concin, Hans
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    A prospective study on metabolic risk factors and gallbladder cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer (Me-Can) collaborative study2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, e89368- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the association between metabolic risk factors (individually and in combination) and risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC). Methods: The metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can) includes cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden with data on 578,700 men and women. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to calculate relative risks of GBC by body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and plasma levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides as continuous standardised variables and their standardised sum of metabolic syndrome (MetS) z-score. The risk estimates were corrected for random error in measurements. Results: During an average follow-up of 12.0 years (SD = 7.8), 184 primary gallbladder cancers were diagnosed. Relative risk of gallbladder cancer per unit increment of z-score adjusted for age, smoking status and BMI (except for BMI itself) and stratified by birth year, sex and sub-cohorts, was for BMI 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.11, 1.57) and blood glucose 1.76 (1.10, 2.85). Further analysis showed that the effect of BMI on GBC risk is larger among women in the premenopausal age group (1.84 (1.23, 2.78)) compared to those in the postmenopausal age group (1.29 (0.93, 1.79)). For the other metabolic factors no significant association was found (mid blood pressure 0.96 (0.71, 1.31), cholesterol 0.84 (0.66, 1.06) and serum triglycerides 1.16 (0.82, 1.64)). The relative risk per one unit increment of the MetS z-score was 1.37 (1.07, 1.73). Conclusion: This study showed that increasing BMI and impaired glucose metabolism pose a possible risk for gallbladder cancer. Beyond the individual factors, the results also showed that the metabolic syndrome as an entity presents a risk constellation for the occurrence of gallbladder cancer.

  • 43. Borena, Wegene
    et al.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Strohmaier, Susanne
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Bjørge, Tone
    Manjer, Jonas
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Selmer, Randi
    Almquist, Martin
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Engeland, Anders
    Tretli, Steinar
    Concin, Hans
    Strasak, Alexander
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Serum triglycerides and cancer risk in the metabolic syndrome and cancer (Me-Can) collaborative study2011In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 22, no 2, 291-299 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from our study provided evidence for a possible role of serum triglycerides in cancer development.

  • 44. Borena, Wegene
    et al.
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Strohmaier, Susanne
    Strasak, Alexander
    Manjer, Jonas
    Johansen, Dorthe
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Rapp, Kilian
    Concin, Hans
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Long-term temporal trends in cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors2009In: Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift, ISSN 0043-5325, E-ISSN 1613-7671, Vol. 121, no 19-20, 623-630 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Metabolic factors such as obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia have consistently been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There is also growing evidence that these factors are linked to cancer incidence and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate long-term trends in major metabolic risk factors in three large cohorts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from 239,602 individuals aged 25-64 years participating in health examinations between 1976 and 2005 were used to estimate prevalence and trends in five risk factors. RESULTS: Irrespective of geographic location, individual metabolic risk factors showed divergent trends across the observation period. Whereas obesity and hyperglycemia in men increased by a per decade ratio of 1.54 (95% CI: 1.42-1.66) and 1.62 (95% CI: 1.49-1.76), respectively, and in women by 1.48 (95% CI: 1.41-1.56) and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.57-1.75), hypertension decreased by 0.71 (95% CI: 0.68-0.74) in men and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.79-0.86) in women. Dyslipidemia increased from the 1970s to the 1980s but declined in the succeeding decade. A combination of three or more of these risk factors increased significantly in men by a ratio of 1.15 (95% CI: 1.08-1.22) per decade and in women by 1.20 (95% CI: 1.15-1.27). CONCLUSION: The study shows that individual metabolic risk factors followed divergent trends over the period of three decades even though the combination of three or more risk factors used as a proxy for the metabolic syndrome appeared to be stable over the last two of the decades. The two key components of the syndrome, namely BMI and glucose levels, increased significantly and deserve professional attention.

  • 45. Borena, Wegene
    et al.
    Strohmaier, Susanne
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Bjørge, Tone
    Lindkvist, Björn
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Edlinger, Michael
    Stocks, Tanja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Manjer, Jonas
    Engeland, Anders
    Selmer, Randi
    Häggström, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Tretli, Steinar
    Concin, Hans
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Ulmer, Hanno
    Metabolic risk factors and primary liver cancer in a prospective study of 578,700 adults2012In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 131, no 1, 193-200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initial studies have indicated diabetes and obesity to be risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma; but the association between other metabolic risk factors and primary liver cancer (PLC) has not been investigated. The metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can) includes cohorts from Norway, Austria and Sweden with data on 578,700 subjects. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate relative risks (RRs) of PLC by body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and plasma levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides as continuous standardized variables (z-score with mean = 0 and standard deviation (SD) = 1) and their standardized sum of metabolic syndrome (MetS) z-score. RRs were corrected for random error in measurements. During an average follow-up of 12.0 years (SD = 7.8), 266 PLCs were diagnosed among cohort members. RR of liver cancer per unit increment of z-score adjusted for age, smoking status and BMI and stratified by birth year, sex and sub-cohorts, was for BMI 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24-1.58), mid blood pressure 2.08 (0.95-4.73), blood glucose 2.13 (1.55-2.94) cholesterol 0.62 (0.51-0.76) and serum triglycerides 0.85 (0.65-1.10). The RR per one unit increment of the MetS z-score was 1.35 (1.12-1.61). BMI, glucose and a composite MetS score were positively and cholesterol negatively associated with risk of liver cancer.

  • 46. Bosco, Cecilia
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Nilsson, Per
    Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy and Risk of Thromboembolic Events2017In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 97, no 5, 1026-1031 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of thromboembolic disease (TED) after radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent for prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods: We identified all men who received RT as curative treatment (n=9410) and grouped according to external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). By comparing with an age-and county-matched comparison cohort of PCa-free men (n = 46,826), we investigated risk of TED after RT using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The model was adjusted for tumor characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, PCa treatments, and known risk factors of TED, such as recent surgery and disease progression. Results: Between 2006 and 2013, 6232 men with PCa received EBRT, and 3178 underwent BT. A statistically significant association was found between EBRT and BT and risk of pulmonary embolism in the crude analysis. However, upon adjusting for known TED risk factors these associations disappeared. No significant associations were found between BT or EBRT and deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion: Curative RT for prostate cancer using contemporary methodologies was not associated with an increased risk of TED.

  • 47. Botteri, E.
    et al.
    Ferrari, P.
    Roswall, N.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Hjartaker, A.
    Huerta, J. M.
    Fortner, R. T.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Karakatsani, A.
    La Vecchia, C.
    Pala, V.
    Perez-Cornago, A.
    Sonestedt, E.
    Liedberg, F.
    Overvad, K.
    Sanchez, M. J.
    Gram, I. T.
    Stepien, M.
    Trijsburg, L.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Johansson, M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Kuehn, T.
    Panico, S.
    Tumino, R.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.
    Weiderpass, E.
    Alcohol consumption and risk of urothelial cell bladder cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 141, no 10, 1963-1970 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Findings on the association between alcohol consumption and bladder cancer are inconsistent. We investigated that association in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. We included 476,160 individuals mostly aged 35-70 years, enrolled in ten countries and followed for 13.9 years on average. Hazard ratios (HR) for developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC; 1,802 incident cases) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models. Alcohol consumption at baseline and over the life course was analyzed, as well as different types of beverages (beer, wine, spirits). Baseline alcohol intake was associated with a statistically nonsignificant increased risk of UCC (HR 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.06 for each additional 12 g/day). HR in smokers was 1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.07). Men reporting high baseline intakes of alcohol (>96 g/day) had an increased risk of UCC (HR 1.57; 95% CI 1.03-2.40) compared to those reporting moderate intakes (<6 g/day), but no dose-response relationship emerged. In men, an increased risk of aggressive forms of UCC was observed even at lower doses (>6 to 24 g/day). Average lifelong alcohol intake was not associated with the risk of UCC, however intakes of spirits>24 g/day were associated with an increased risk of UCC in men (1.38; 95% CI 1.01-1.91) and smokers (1.39; 95% CI 1.01-1.92), compared to moderate intakes. We found no association between alcohol and UCC in women and never smokers. In conclusion, we observed some associations between alcohol and UCC in men and in smokers, possibly because of residual confounding by tobacco smoking.

  • 48.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Egevad, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Subgroups of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases defined through an inverse relationship between androgen receptor activity and immune response2017In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 71, no 5, 776-787 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Novel therapies for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are needed, particularly for cancers not driven by androgen receptor (AR) activation. Objectives: To identify molecular subgroups of PC bone metastases of relevance for therapy.

    Design, setting, and participants: Fresh-frozen bone metastasis samples from men with CRPC (n = 40), treatment-naïve PC (n = 8), or other malignancies (n = 12) were characterized using whole-genome expression profiling, multivariate principal component analysis (PCA), and functional enrichment analysis. Expression profiles were verified by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in an extended set of bone metastases (n = 77) and compared to levels in malignant and adjacent benign prostate tissue from patients with localized disease (n = 12). Selected proteins were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. A cohort of PC patients (n = 284) diagnosed at transurethral resection with long follow-up was used for prognostic evaluation.

    Results and limitations: The majority of CRPC bone metastases (80%) was defined as AR-driven based on PCA analysis and high expression of the AR, AR co-regulators (FOXA1, HOXB13), and AR-regulated genes (KLK2, KLK3, NKX3.1, STEAP2, TMPRSS2); 20% were non–AR-driven. Functional enrichment analysis indicated high metabolic activity and low immune responses in AR-driven metastases. Accordingly, infiltration of CD3+ and CD68+ cells was lower in AR-driven than in non–AR-driven metastases, and tumor cell HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with nuclear AR immunoreactivity. RT-PCR analysis showed low MHC class I expression (HLA-A, TAP1, and PSMB9 mRNA) in PC bone metastases compared to benign and malignant prostate tissue and bone metastases of other origins. In primary PC, low HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was associated with high Gleason score, bone metastasis, and short cancer-specific survival. Limitations include the limited number of patients studied and the single metastasis sample studied per patient.

    Conclusions: Most CRPC bone metastases show high AR and metabolic activities and low immune responses. A subgroup instead shows low AR and metabolic activities, but high immune responses. Targeted therapy for these groups should be explored. Patient summary: We studied heterogeneities at a molecular level in bone metastasis samples obtained from men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. We found differences of possible importance for therapy selection in individual patients.

  • 49. Brannon, A Rose
    et al.
    Reddy, Anupama
    Seiler, Michael
    Arreola, Alexandra
    Moore, Dominic T
    Pruthi, Raj S
    Wallen, Eric M
    Nielsen, Matthew E
    Liu, Huiqing
    Nathanson, Katherine L
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Zhao, Hongjuan
    Brooks, James D
    Ganesan, Shridar
    Bhanot, Gyan
    Rathmell, W Kimryn
    Molecular Stratification of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma by Consensus Clustering Reveals Distinct Subtypes and Survival Patterns.2010In: Genes & cancer, ISSN 1947-6027, Vol. 1, no 2, 152-163 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the predominant RCC subtype, but even within this classification, the natural history is heterogeneous and difficult to predict. A sophisticated understanding of the molecular features most discriminatory for the underlying tumor heterogeneity should be predicated on identifiable and biologically meaningful patterns of gene expression. Gene expression microarray data were analyzed using software that implements iterative unsupervised consensus clustering algorithms to identify the optimal molecular subclasses, without clinical or other classifying information. ConsensusCluster analysis identified two distinct subtypes of ccRCC within the training set, designated clear cell type A (ccA) and B (ccB). Based on the core tumors, or most well-defined arrays, in each subtype, logical analysis of data (LAD) defined a small, highly predictive gene set that could then be used to classify additional tumors individually. The subclasses were corroborated in a validation data set of 177 tumors and analyzed for clinical outcome. Based on individual tumor assignment, tumors designated ccA have markedly improved disease-specific survival compared to ccB (median survival of 8.6 vs 2.0 years, P = 0.002). Analyzed by both univariate and multivariate analysis, the classification schema was independently associated with survival. Using patterns of gene expression based on a defined gene set, ccRCC was classified into two robust subclasses based on inherent molecular features that ultimately correspond to marked differences in clinical outcome. This classification schema thus provides a molecular stratification applicable to individual tumors that has implications to influence treatment decisions, define biological mechanisms involved in ccRCC tumor progression, and direct future drug discovery.

  • 50. Bratt, Ola
    et al.
    Berglund, Anders
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Törnblom, Magnus
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Prostate cancer diagnosed after prostate-specific antigen testing of men without clinical signs of the disease: a population-based study from the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 44, no 6, 384-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate the effects of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing of men without clinical signs of prostate cancer on the incidence of prostate cancer in Sweden. Material and methods. Information on the cause of diagnosis, tumour characteristics and primary treatment for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer between January 1999 and December 2007 was extracted from the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden. This register includes data for 95% of Swedish prostate cancer cases. Results. The total age-standardized annual incidence of prostate cancer per 100 000 men increased from 187 in 1999 to 233 in 2004, but decreased thereafter to 196 in 2007. The incidence of asymptomatic cases also peaked in 2004 (at 62 per 100 000 men), but varied six-fold between different counties in that year (16–98 per 100 000 men). Asymptomatic cases (n = 17 143) constituted 15% of all new cases in 2000 and 30% in 2007. Almost as many cases were diagnosed in stage T1c in men with symptoms, usually from the lower urinary tract. Together these two groups constituted 29% of all new cases in 2000 and 52% in 2007. It was estimated that at least one-third of all Swedish men aged 50–75 years had a PSA test between 2000 and 2007. Conclusions. Even though screening for prostate cancer is not recommended in Sweden, PSA testing of men without clinical signs of prostate cancer is common. The effects on the Swedish incidence of prostate cancer were similar to those reported from the USA.

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