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  • 1. Abafe, Ovokeroye A.
    et al.
    Späth, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Buckley, Chris
    Stark, Annegret
    Pietruschka, Bjoern
    Martincigh, Bice S.
    LC-MS/MS determination of antiretroviral drugs in influents and effluents from wastewater treatment plants in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa2018In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 200, p. 660-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa has the largest occurrence of the human immune deficiency virus (HIV) in the world but has also implemented the largest antiretroviral (ARV) treatment programme. It was therefore of interest to determine the presence and concentrations of commonly used antiretroviral drugs (ARVDs) and, also, to determine the capabilities of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for removing ARVDs. To this end, a surrogate standard based LC-MS/MS method was optimized and applied for the detection of thirteen ARVDs used in the treatment and management of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in two major and one modular WWTP in the eThekwini Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The method was validated and the detection limits fell within the range of 2–20 ng L−1. The analytical recoveries for the ARVDs were mainly greater than 50% with acceptable relative standard deviations. The concentration values ranged from <LOD – 53000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 34000 ng L−1 (effluent) in a decentralized wastewater treatment facility (DEWATS); <LOD – 24000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 33000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Northern WWTP and 61–34000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 20000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Phoenix WWTP. Whilst abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine were almost completely removed from the effluents, atazanavir, efavirenz, lopinavir and nevirapine persisted in the effluents from all three WWTPs. To estimate the ecotoxicological risks associated with the discharge of ARVDs, a countrywide survey focussing on the occurrence of ARVDs in WWTPs, surface and fresh water bodies, and aquatic organisms, is necessary.

  • 2.
    Abbasi, Ahtisham Fazeel
    et al.
    German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Kaiserslautern, Germany; University of Kaiserslautern-Landau, Kaiserslautern (RPTU), Germany.
    Asim, Muhammad Nabeel
    German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Sartorius Corporate Research, Sartorius Stedim Data Analytics, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dengel, Andreas
    German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Kaiserslautern, Germany; University of Kaiserslautern-Landau, Kaiserslautern (RPTU), Germany.
    Ahmed, Sheraz
    German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Deep learning architectures for the prediction of YY1-mediated chromatin loops2023In: Bioinformatics research and applications: 19th international symposium, ISBRA 2023, Wrocław, Poland, October 9–12, 2023, proceedings / [ed] Xuan Guo; Serghei Mangul; Murray Patterson; Alexander Zelikovsky, Springer, 2023, p. 72-84Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    YY1-mediated chromatin loops play substantial roles in basic biological processes like gene regulation, cell differentiation, and DNA replication. YY1-mediated chromatin loop prediction is important to understand diverse types of biological processes which may lead to the development of new therapeutics for neurological disorders and cancers. Existing deep learning predictors are capable to predict YY1-mediated chromatin loops in two different cell lines however, they showed limited performance for the prediction of YY1-mediated loops in the same cell lines and suffer significant performance deterioration in cross cell line setting. To provide computational predictors capable of performing large-scale analyses of YY1-mediated loop prediction across multiple cell lines, this paper presents two novel deep learning predictors. The two proposed predictors make use of Word2vec, one hot encoding for sequence representation and long short-term memory, and a convolution neural network along with a gradient flow strategy similar to DenseNet architectures. Both of the predictors are evaluated on two different benchmark datasets of two cell lines HCT116 and K562. Overall the proposed predictors outperform existing DEEPYY1 predictor with an average maximum margin of 4.65%, 7.45% in terms of AUROC, and accuracy, across both of the datases over the independent test sets and 5.1%, 3.2% over 5-fold validation. In terms of cross-cell evaluation, the proposed predictors boast maximum performance enhancements of up to 9.5% and 27.1% in terms of AUROC over HCT116 and K562 datasets.

  • 3.
    Abdullatif, Zina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sjuksköterskors bidrag till farmakovigilans arbete i Sverige En retrospektiv analys av alla sjuksköterskors biverkningsrapporter år 2015: En retrospektiv analys av alla sjuksköterskors biverkningsrapporter år 20152016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 4.
    Abed, Shahla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Läkemedel mot Bcl-2 överuttryckande resistenta Prostatatumörer: Läkemedel mot Bcl-2 överuttryckande resistenta Prostatatumörer2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 5.
    Abiodun Daramola, Olamide
    et al.
    Centre for Chemico- and Biomedicinal Research (CCBR), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa; Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Natural Science, Walter Sisulu University, Private Bag XI, Mthatha, South Africa.
    Bazibuhe Safari, Justin
    Centre for Chemico- and Biomedicinal Research (CCBR), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa; Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Public Health, Official University of Bukavu, Bukavu, Democratic Republic Congo.
    Adeniyi, Kayode Omotayo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Siwe-Noundou, Xavier
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Gauteng, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Margaret Kirkpatrick Dingle, Laura
    Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit (BioBRU), Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa.
    Lesley Edkins, Adrienne
    Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit (BioBRU), Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa.
    Foster Tseki, Potlaki
    Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Natural Science, Walter Sisulu University, Private Bag XI, Mthatha, South Africa.
    Werner Maçedo Krause, Rui
    Centre for Chemico- and Biomedicinal Research (CCBR), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa.
    Biocompatible liposome and chitosan-coated CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe multi-core-multi-shell fluorescent nanoprobe for biomedical applications2024In: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, ISSN 1010-6030, E-ISSN 1873-2666, Vol. 454, article id 115714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are brightly luminescent nanocrystals that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent probes for in vivo bioimaging and theranostic applications. CdTe QDs toxicity to normal human cells is minimized by coating with a less toxic ZnS and ZnSe shell forming a core–shell nanostructure. However, coating with ZnS or ZnSe shell is insufficient to prevent the leaching of toxic Cd metal ions. To further minimize toxicity, thiol dual capped CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe multi-core-multi-shell quantum dots were coated with nanoliposome or liposome vesicles (CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe@liposome) and chitosan nanoparticles (CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe@ChitNPs) and their biocompatibility on HeLa and Vero cells were investigated. Different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques were used to elucidate nanocomposites' optical, morphological, and physicochemical properties. The coating of CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe multi-core-multi-shell quantum dots were conducted at different formulations (F1, F2 and F3) and results from the fluorescence studies show that F3 demonstrated the best interaction for both liposome and ChitNPs composite. Exposure to 12 h UV illumination studies also reveals that CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe@liposome shows an enhancement in fluorescence compared to CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe@ChitNPs. The cytotoxicity of the formulations towards HeLa and Vero cells also depicted minimal toxicity compared to CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe QDs that shows much higher toxicity (IC50 = 0.09381 mg/ml). It was further observed that liposome coated multi-core-multi-shell QDs@F2 demonstrated lower toxicity (IC50 = 0.4364 mg/ml) compared to ChitNPs coated multi-core-multi-shell QDs@F2 (IC50 = 0.1618 mg/ml). Results from the florescence imaging studies reveal that CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe-multi-core-multi-shell QDs liposomes and ChitNPs composite retained most of their fluorescence and properties and could easily be tracked in cells and visualized around the nucleus. This indicates the successful internalization of the QDs in the cytosol. Therefore, these results shows that coating CdTe multi-core-mutli-shell QDs with liposomes and ChitNPs produce better biocompatibility compared to uncoated multi-core–shell QDs. However, liposome coated CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe multi-core-multi-shell quantum dots show better optical properties, photostability and biocompatibility compared to CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe multi-core-multi-shell quantum dots with ChitNPs coating. These particles therefore show good promise in cell-labelling and drug delivery studies.

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  • 6. Abreu, Ilka N.
    et al.
    Aksmann, Anna
    Bajhaiya, Amit K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Algal Biotechnology Lab, Department of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Thiruvarur, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Benlloch, Reyes
    Giordano, Mario
    Pokora, Wojciech
    Selstam, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Moritz, Thomas
    Changes in lipid and carotenoid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during induction of CO2-concentrating mechanism: Cellular response to low CO2 stress2020In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 52, article id 102099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photosynthetic organisms strictly depend on CO2 availability and the CO2:O2 ratio, as both CO2/O2 compete for catalytic site of Rubisco. Green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, can overcome CO2 shortage by inducing CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM). Cells transferred to low-CO2 are subjected to light-driven oxidative stress due to decrease in the electron sink. Response to environmental perturbations is mediated to some extent by changes in the lipid and carotenoid metabolism. We thus hypothesize that when cells are challenged with changes in CO2 availability, changes in the lipidome and carotenoids profile occur. These changes expected to be transient, when CCM is activated, CO2 limitation will be substantially ameliorated. In our experiments, cells were transferred from high (5%) to low (air equilibrium) CO2. qPCR analysis of genes related to CCM and lipid metabolism was carried out. Lipidome was analyzed both in whole cells and in isolated lipid droplets. We characterized the changes in polar lipids, fatty acids and ketocarotenoids. In general, polar lipids significantly and transiently increased in lipid droplets during CCM. Similar pattern was observed for xanthophylls, ketocarotenoids and their esters. The data supports our hypothesis about the roles of lipids and carotenoids in tackling the oxidative stress associated with acclimation to sub-saturating CO2.

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  • 7. Accinelli, Cesare
    et al.
    Saccà, Maria Ludovica
    Batisson, Isabelle
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mencarelli, Mariangela
    Grabic, Roman
    Removal of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and other selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater using a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of Phanerochaete chrysosporium2010In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 436-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity of the ligninolytic fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade a wide variety of environmentally persistent xenobiotics has been largely reported in the literature. Beside other factors, one barrier to a wider use of this bioremediation fungus is the availability of effective formulations that ensure easy preparation, handling and application. In this series of laboratory experiments, we evaluated the efficiency of a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of P. chrysosporium for removal of four selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater samples. Addition of inoculated granules to samples of the wastewater treatment plant of Bologna significantly increased the removal of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and the antibiotics, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazol, and ciprofloxacin. Similar effects were also observed in effluent water. Oseltamivir was the most persistent of the four active substances. After 30d of incubation, approximately two times more oseltamivir was removed in bioremediated wastewater than controls. The highest removal efficiency of the bioplastic formulation was observed with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Microbiological DNA-based analysis showed that the bioplastic matrix supported the growth of P. chrysosporium, thus facilitating its adaptation to unusual environment such as wastewater.

  • 8. Accinelli, Cesare
    et al.
    Saccà, Maria Ludovica
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mencarelli, Mariangela
    Lindberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olsen, Björn
    Dissipation and removal of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in different aquatic environments2010In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 79, no 8, p. 891-897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu) has received recent attention due to the potential use as a first-line defense against H5N1 and H1N1 influenza viruses. Research has shown that oseltamivir is not removed during conventional wastewater treatments, thus having the potential to enter surface water bodies. A series of laboratory experiments investigated the fate and the removal of oseltamivir in two surface water ecosystems of Japan and in a municipal wastewater treatment plant located in Northern Italy. Persistence of oseltamivir in surface water ranged from non-detectable degradation to a half-life of 53d. After 40d, <3% of radiolabeled oseltamivir evolved as (14)CO(2). The presence of sediments (5%) led to a significant increase of oseltamivir degradation and mineralization rates. A more intense mineralization was observed in samples of the wastewater treatment plant when applying a long incubation period (40d). More precisely, 76% and 37% of the initial radioactivity applied as (14)C-oseltamivir was recovered as (14)CO(2) from samples of the biological tank and effluent water, respectively. Two bacterial strains growing on oseltamivir as sole carbon source were isolated and used for its removal from synthetic medium and environmental samples, including surface water and wastewater. Inoculation of water and wastewater samples with the two oseltamivir-degrading strains showed that mineralization of oseltamivir was significantly higher in both inoculated water and wastewater, than in uninoculated controls. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR analysis showed that Tamiflu would not affect the microbial population of surface water and wastewater.

  • 9. Acharya, Shravan S.
    et al.
    Easton, Christopher D.
    McCoy, Thomas M.
    Spiccia, Leone
    Ohlin, C. André
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Winther-Jensen, Bjorn
    Diverse composites of metal-complexes and PEDOT facilitated by metal-free vapour phase polymerization2017In: Reactive & functional polymers, ISSN 1381-5148, E-ISSN 1873-166X, Vol. 116, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Oxidative polymerization for the manufacture of conducting polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene) has traditionally employed iron(III) salts. Demonstrated in this study is vapour phase polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedio- xythiophene using a metal-free oxidant, ammonium persulfate, leading to films with an estimated conductivity of 75 S/cm. Additionally, a route for embedding active transition metal complexes into these poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/-poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) films via vapour assisted complexation is outlined. Here, the vapour pressure of solid ligands around their melting temperatures was exploited to ensure complexation to metal ions added into the oxidant mixture prior to polymerization of PEDOT. Four composite systems are discussed, viz. PEDOT/PSS embedded with tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)cobalt(III), tris(2,2-bipyridine)cobalt(II), tris(1,10- phenanthroline)cobalt(II) and tris(8-hyd-roxyquinolinato)aluminium(III). Using these composites, electrochemical reduction of nitrite to ammonia with a faradaic efficiency of 61% was reported.

  • 10. Acharya, Shravan
    et al.
    Winther-Jensen, Bjorn
    Spiccia, Leone
    Ohlin, André C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Rates of water exchange in 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of CoII and MnII2017In: Australian journal of chemistry (Print), ISSN 0004-9425, E-ISSN 1445-0038, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 751-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rates and activation parameters of water exchange at pH 3.0 have been determined using variable temperature 17O NMR spectroscopy for four CoII complexes and one MnII complex: [Co(bpy)(H2O)4]2+, [Co(bpy)2 (H2O)2]2+, [Co(phen)-(H2O)4]2+, [Co(phen)2 (H2O)2]2+, and [Mn(bpy)(H2O)4]2+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridyl and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline). Substitution of aquo ligands with 1,10-phenanthroline or 2,2′-bipyridyl leads to an increase in the rate of exchange in the manganese complexes, from k298 (1.8 ± 0.1) × 107 s-1 for [Mn(H2O)6]2+ to (7.2 ± 0.3) × 107 s-1 for [Mn(phen)2 (H2O)2]2+, whereas the trends are more complex for the cobalt complexes. We have used the new data in conjunction with literature data for similar complexes to analyse the effect of M–OH2 distance and degree of substitution.

  • 11.
    Addario, Barbara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Alpha-actinin - an amazing journey through time and species2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In eukaryotes, the actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in a large variety of cellular events. Its reorganization is regulated by a plethora of actin-modulating proteins, such as α-actinin.

    α-actinin is a ubiquitous actin-binding protein that belongs to the spectrin superfamily. This family, besides α-actinin, includes spectrin, dystrophin and utrophin. Phylogenetic analyses have indicated that the family members arose after several intragene duplications and rearrangements of a common ancestral α-actinin isoform. Up to the invertebrate-vertebrate bifurcation, organisms seemed to have a single, calcium-dependent α‑actinin. After the split, invertebrates have kept this single isoform, in contrast to vertebrates that acquired four distinct isoforms. Of the four vertebrate α-actinin isoforms, the two present in non-muscle cells are typically calcium sensitive while the two muscle isoforms are calcium insensitive.

    α-actinin in higher organisms is characterized by the presence of three distinct structural domains: a highly conserved N-terminal actin-binding domain, a central rod domain with four spectrin repeats and a calcium-binding C terminus with EF-hand motifs. In some primitive organisms, such as protozoa and fungi, the rod domain of α-actinin contains only one or two spectrin repeats. With the completion of an ever increasing number of genomes, new and atypical α‑actinin sequences had been available that have not been characterized yet. To obtain a firmer understanding of the evolutionary history of α-actinin, the main objective of this study was to identify, purify and biochemically characterize atypical α‑actinin or α‑actinin-like proteins of the parasite Entamoeba histolytica and of the fungus Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our results show that both isoforms, despite the much shorter rod domain, are able to bind and cross-link actin filaments and therefore can be considered genuine α-actinins. 

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  • 12.
    Addario, Barbara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Backman, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Alpha-actinin of Schizosaccharomyces pombeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Addario, Barbara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Backman, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    The domain structure of Entamoeba α-actinin22010In: Cellular & Molecular Biology Letters (Druk), ISSN 1425-8153, E-ISSN 1689-1392, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 665-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entamoeba histolytica, a major agent of human amoebiasis, expresses two distinct forms of α-actinin, a ubiquitous actin-binding protein that is present in most eukaryotic organisms. In contrast to all metazoan α-actinins, in both isoforms the intervening rod domain that connects the N-terminal actin-binding domain with the C-terminal EF-hands is much shorter. It is suggested that these α-actinins may be involved in amoeboid motility and phagocytosis, so we cloned and characterised each domain of one of these α-actinins to better understand their functional role. The results clearly showed that the domains have properties very similar to those of conventional α-actinins.

  • 14.
    Addario, Barbara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Huang, Shenghua
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sauer, Uwe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Backman, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Entamoeba histolytica α-actinin-2 rod domain2011In: Acta Crystallographica. Section F: Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications, ISSN 1744-3091, E-ISSN 1744-3091, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 1214-1217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    -Actinins form antiparallel homodimers that are able to cross-link actin filaments. The protein contains three domains: an N-terminal actin-binding domain followed by a central rod domain and a calmodulin-like EF-hand domain at the C-terminus. Here, crystallization of the rod domain of Entamoeba histolytica -actinin-2 is reported; it crystallized in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.8, b = 79.1, c = 141.8 Å. A Matthews coefficient VM of 2.6 Å3 Da-1 suggests that there are two molecules and 52.5% solvent content in the asymmetric unit. A complete native data set extending to a d-spacing of 2.8 Å was collected on beamline I911-2 at MAX-lab, Sweden.

     

  • 15. Addario, Barbara
    et al.
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Persson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Backman, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Characterisation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe alpha-actinin2016In: PeerJ, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 4, article id e1858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a fundamental role in eukaryotic cells. Its reorganization is regulated by a plethora of actin-modulating proteins, such as a-actinin. In higher organisms, alpha-actinin is characterized by the presence of three distinct structural domains: an N-terminal actin-binding domain and a C-terminal region with EF-hand motif separated by a central rod domain with four spectrin repeats. Sequence analysis has revealed that the central rod domain of alpha-actinin from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe consists of only two spectrin repeats. To obtain a firmer understanding of the structure and function of this unconventional alpha-actinin, we have cloned and characterized each structural domain. Our results show that this alpha-actinin isoform is capable of forming dimers and that the rod domain is required for this. However, its actin-binding and cross-linking activity appears less efficient compared to conventional alpha-actinins. The solved crystal structure of the actin-binding domain indicates that the closed state is stabilised by hydrogen bonds and a salt bridge not present in other a-actinins, which may reduce the affinity for actin.

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  • 16. Adebahr, J
    et al.
    Forsyth, M
    Gavelin, P
    Jacobsson, P
    Orädd, Greger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry.
    Ion and Solvent Dynamics in Gel Electrolytes Based on Ethylene Oxide Grafted Acrylate Polymers2002In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 106, no 47, p. 12119-12123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multinuclear pulsed field gradient NMR measurements and rheological viscosity measurements were performed on three series of polymer gel electrolytes. The gels were based on a lithium salt electrolyte swollen into a copolymer matrix comprising an acrylate backbone and ethylene oxide side chains. In each series the side chains differed in length and number, but the acrylate-to-ethylene oxide ratio was kept constant. It was found that the self-diffusion coefficient of the cations was much lower than that of the anions, and that it decreased rapidly when the side chains got longer. In contrast, the self-diffusion coefficient of the anions was found to be independent of chain length. In the gel electrolytes, the diffusion coefficients of the solvent molecules are relatively constant despite an increased viscosity with increasing length of the side chains. However, in salt-free gels made for comparison, the diffusion coefficients of the solvent molecules decreased with increasing length of the side chains, which is consistent with an increased viscosity.

  • 17.
    Adediran, Gbotemi A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Liem-Nguyen, Van
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Song, Yu
    Schaefer, Jeffra K.
    Slcyllberg, Ulf
    Björn, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Microbial Biosynthesis of Thiol Compounds: Implications for Speciation, Cellular Uptake, and Methylation of Hg(II)2019In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 14, p. 8187-8196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular uptake of inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) is a key step in microbial formation of neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg), but the mechanisms remain largely unidentified. We show that the iron reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces and exports appreciable amounts of low molecular mass thiol (LMM-RSH) compounds reaching concentrations of about 100 nM in the assay medium. These compounds largely control the chemical speciation and bioavailability of Hg(II) by the formation of Hg(LMM-RS)<INF><INF><INF>2</INF></INF> </INF>complexes (primarily with cysteine) in assays without added thiols. By characterizing these effects, we show that the thermodynamic stability of Hg(II)-complexes is a principal controlling factor for Hg(II) methylation by this bacterium such that less stable complexes with mixed ligation involving LMM-RSH, OH-, and Cl- are methylated at higher rates than the more stable Hg(LMM-RS)<INF>2</INF> complexes. The Hg(II) methylation rate across different Hg(LMM-RS)<INF>2</INF> compounds is also influenced by the chemical structure of the complexes. In contrast to the current perception of microbial uptake of Hg, our results adhere to generalized theories for metal biouptake based on metal complexation with cell surface ligands and refine the mechanistic understanding of Hg(II) availability for microbial methylation.

  • 18.
    Adeniyi, Omotayo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Osmanaj, Blerina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Department of Chemistry, University of Prishtina, Prishtina, Republic of Kosovo.
    Manavalan, Gopinathan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Berisha, Avni
    Department of Chemistry, University of Prishtina, Prishtina, Republic of Kosovo.
    Tesfalidet, Solomon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Reagentless impedimetric immunosensor for monitoring of methotrexate in human blood serum using multiwalled carbon nanotube@polypyrrole/polytyramine film electrode2024In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 268, no Part 1, article id 125316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ensuring effective monitoring of methotrexate (MTX) levels in the bloodstream of cancer patients undergoing high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy is crucial to prevent potentially harmful side effects. However, the absence of portable analytical devices suitable for point-of-care bedside monitoring has presented a significant obstacle to achieving real-time MTX monitoring. In this study, we developed an impedimetric immunosensor that doesn't require reagents for measuring MTX levels in undiluted human blood serum. This reagentless approach simplifies the assay process, enabling rapid and straightforward MTX quantification. The immunosensor transducer was fabricated by electrodepositing conductive network of porous multiwalled carbon nanotube@polypyrrole/polytyramine on screen-printed gold microchip electrode (SP–Au/MWCNT70@PPy-PTA). Polyclonal anti-MTX antibodies were immobilized on the film, acting as the immunorecognition element. Non-specific binding was prevented by blocking the transducer interface with denatured bovine serum albumin (dBSA) fibrils, resulting in SP-Au/MWCNT70@PPy-PTA/anti-MTXAb|dBSA film electrode. When MTX binds to the SP-Au/MWCNT70@PPy-PTA/anti-MTXAb|dBSA interface, the film conductance and electron transfer resistance changes. This conductivity attenuation allows for electrochemical impedimetric signal transduction without a redox-probe solution. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results showed increased charge transfer resistance and phase angle as MTX concentrations increased. The SP-Au/MWCNT70@PPy-PTA/anti-MTXAb|dBSA demonstrated high sensitivity, with a linear response from 0.02 to 20.0 μM and a detection limit of 1.93 nM. The detection limit was 50 times lower than the intended safe level of MTX in human serum. The immunosensor exhibited minimal cross-reactivity with endogenous MTX analogs and serum proteins. The SP-Au/MWCNT70@PPy-PTA/anti-MTXAb|dBSA immunosensor presents a simple and rapid method for therapeutic drug monitoring compared to traditional immunoassay systems.

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  • 19.
    Adeniyi, Omotayo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Osmanaj, Blerina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Department of Chemistry, University of Prishtina, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo.
    Manavalan, Gopinathan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Samikannu, Ajaikumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku, 20500, Finland.
    Avni, Berisah
    Department of Chemistry, University of Prishtina, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo.
    Boily, Jean-Francois
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tesfalidet, Solomon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Engineering of layered iron vanadate nanostructure for electrocatalysis: simultaneous detection of methotrexate and folinic acid in blood serum2023In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, article id 142538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, nanostructure kazakhstanite-like iron vanadate (FexV3xOy.H2O) was synthesized and calcined at different temperatures (100-800 °C) in a nitrogen atmosphere. The material was used to modify screen-printed carbon electrodes to achieve an electrocatalytic effect on the surface. The relationship between calcination conditions and the catalytic performance of the electrode towards the oxidation of chemotherapeutic drugs, including methotrexate (MTX) and folinic acid (FA), was studied. Various spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the synthesized materials. The results show that calcination induces changes in the electronic structure, nanostructure morphology, electroactive surface area, and electrocatalytic performance of the material. Screen-printed carbon electrode modified with FexV3xOy calcinated at 450 °C (SPC/FexV3xOy-450) was used to develop a voltammetric sensor for the determination of MTX and FA in blood serum. The response of the SPC/FexV3xOy-450 towards the electrooxidation of MTX and FA was the highest in comparison to the bare SPC and SPC/FexV3xOy calcined at other temperatures. The SPC/FexV3xOy-450 exhibited a linear relationship over a wide concentration range: 0.005-200 µM for MTX and 0.05-200 µM for FA. The detection limit was 2.85 nM for MTX and 7.79 nM for FA. Compared to conventional methods, the SPC/FexV3xOy-450 sensor had a short response time (5 min) for simultaneous detection of MTX and FA without signal interferences from coexisting electroactive compounds. The accurate and precise determination of MTX in the presence of FA confirmed the potential clinical applications of SPC/FexV3xOy-450 for therapeutic drug monitoring during chemotherapy.

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  • 20. Adnan, Muhammad
    et al.
    Iqbal, Javed
    Bibi, Shamsa
    Hussain, Riaz
    Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem
    Rashid, Muhammad Abid
    Eliasson, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ayub, Khurshid
    Fine Tuning the Optoelectronic Properties of Triphenylamine Based Donor Molecules for Organic Solar Cells2017In: Zeitschrift fur physikalische Chemie (Munchen. 1991), ISSN 0942-9352, Vol. 231, no 6, p. 1127-1139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geometrical parameters, electronic structures and photophysical properties of three new triphenylamine (TPA) and diphenylamine (DPA) based electron donor materials M1-M3 (for organic solar cells) have been investigated through density functional theory (DFT) methods at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of the theory. TPA and DPA are used as donor moieties due to their electron donating ability while benzothiazole, cyanide and cyanomethylacetate (CMA) moieties have been taken as acceptor moieties. The time dependent-DFT (TD-DFT) method has been employed [TD-B3LYP/6-31G (d)] for the computation of excited state properties in the gas phase and in solvent (chloroform). The polarization continuum model is applied for calculations in the solvent phase. The designed molecules exhibited broad absorption in the visible and near infra-red region of spectrum with respect to a reference molecule "R" of a similar class of compounds. Based on reorganization energies calculations, these materials could act as excellent hole transport materials.

  • 21.
    Adolfsson, Dan E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Synthesis of Ring-fused Peptidomimetics: Interacting with Amyloid Fibrils2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease are the two most common neurological disorders in humans. Both conditions involve progressive death of neurons in the central nervous system, decline in bodily functions and eventually (and invariably), death. So far, no cure exists and the available treatments can only ease symptoms. Despite substantial investments in research, the biomolecular processes are still far from fully understood. However, both diseases are associated with formation of fibrillar protein aggregates called amyloid deposits. Whereas Alzheimer’s disease involves aggregation of the Tau and Amyloid β proteins, α-Synuclein fibrilization plays a key role in Parkinson's disease. Although they are chemically distinct, the deposits consist of protein fibres with similar morphology and fold. Small molecules, such as the thiazoline fused 2-pyridones herein presented, can interfere with the formation of amyloid fibres, or bind to them. Besides having potential for diagnostication and treatment, such small molecules constitute valuable tool compounds in future research, to unravel the mechanisms of amyloid formation and pathology. The first step towards successful treatment, diagnostication and prevention of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease is understanding the causes and underlying mechanisms better. This thesis narrates the synthesis and development of novel chemical structures: multi ring fused peptidomimetics with the ability to bind mature amyloid fibrils, consisting of α-Synuclein or Amyloid β. 

    The first project (articles I, III and VI) describes method development for the extension of bicyclic thiazolino 2-pyrdiones by fusion with aromatic nitrogen heterocycles, which enables the desired amyloid binding properties. Derivatisations of the newly generated central scaffold, and variation of the multiple attached substituents, were subsequently performed in efforts to improve binding strength and solubility, and gain selectivity towards certain fibrils. One of the most promising amyloid fibril binders was evaluated in a human cell line and in mice, and found to be protective against accelerator induced neurotoxicity. One pyrimidine fused compound moreover indicated potent inhibition of Amyloid b aggregation. The second project (articles II, IV and V) focuses on development of methods to modify the thiazoline ring. Ring opening induced by electrophiles generates N-alkenyl 2-pyridones but decreases amyloid binding potency. Introduction of a cyclobutane moiety fused with the thiazoline ring is better tolerated, and adds a terminal alkene moiety that can be exploited in future chemical modifications. Expansion of the five membered thiazoline ring to a six membered dihydrothiazine ring, equipped with a nitrophenyl substituent, provides compounds with enhanced fibril binding capacity, which further inhibits Amyloid β fibril formation in vitro. Taken together, the synthetic methodologies allow construction and late stage modification of complex fused heterocycles, with several points of variation. Thus, the developed methods may be of future value in our laboratories and elsewhere.

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  • 22.
    Adolfsson, Dan E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tyagi, Mohit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Singh, Pardeep
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Deuschmann, Adrian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ådén, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jayaweera, Sanduni Wasana
    Lindgren, Anders E. G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Intramolecular Povarov Reactions for the Synthesis of Chromenopyridine fused 2-Pyridone Polyheterocycles Binding to α-Synuclein and Amyloid-β fibrils2020In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 85, no 21, p. 14174-14189Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A BF3×OEt2 catalyzed intramolecular Povarov reaction was used to synthesize a library of 15 chromenopyridine fused thiazolino-2-pyridone peptidomimetics. The reaction works with a range of O-alkylated salicylaldehydes and amino functionalized thiazolino-2-pyridones, to generate polyheterocycles with diverse substitution. The synthesized compounds were screened for their ability to bind α-synuclein and amyloid β fibrils in vitro. Analogs substituted with a nitro group bind to mature amyloid fibrils, and the activity moreover depends on the positioning of this functional group.

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  • 23.
    Adolfsson, Dan E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tyagi, Mohit
    Singh, Pardeep
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Kaur, Amandeep
    Ådén, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bharate, Jaideep B.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Enhanement of amyloid fibril binding by ring expansion of thiazolino fused 2-pyridone peptidomimeticsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thiazolino fused 2-pyridones undergo thiazoline ring opening by reaction with 2-nitrobenzyl bromide through thi- oether attack, and base promoted fragmentation of the resulting sulfonium ions. Subsequent deprotonation of the benzylic carbon and intramolecular 1,4-addition leads to ring closure, generating dihydrothiazine fused 2-pyridones by net ring expansion of the thiazoline ring. Application of the ring expansion procedure to the pyridine and pyrimidine fused thiazolino 2-pyridones provided compounds with enhanced fibril binding activity.

  • 24. Aeppli, Christoph
    et al.
    Holmstrand, Henry
    Bastviken, David
    Tysklind, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Orjan
    Investigating formation and degradation of polychlorinated phenols in the environment using chlorine and carbon stable isotope fractionation2011In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 242, p. 214-ENVR-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Aeppli, Christoph
    et al.
    Tysklind, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Holmstrand, Henry
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Use of Cl and C Isotopic Fractionation to Identify Degradation and Sources of Polychlorinated Phenols: Mechanistic Study and Field Application2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 790-797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of chlorinated phenols (CPs) as a wood preservative has led to numerous contaminated sawmill sites. However, it remains challenging to assess the extent of in situ degradation of CPs. We evaluated the use of compound-specific chlorine and carbon isotope analysis (Cl- and C-CSIA) to assess CP biotransformation. In a laboratory system, we measured isotopic fractionation during oxidative 2,4,6-trichlorophenol dechlorination by representative soil enzymes (C. fumago chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and laccase from T. versicolor). Using a mathematical model, the validity of the Rayleigh approach to evaluate apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE) was confirmed. A small but significant Cl-AKIE of 1.0022 ± 0.0006 was observed for all three enzymes, consistent with a reaction pathway via a cationic radical species. For carbon, a slight inverse isotope effect was observed (C-AKIE = 0.9945 ± 0.0019). This fractionation behavior is clearly distinguishable from reported reductive dechlorination mechanisms. Based on these results we then assessed degradation and apportioned different types of technical CP mixtures used at two former sawmill sites. To our knowledge, this is the first study that makes use of two-element CSIA to study sources and transformation of CPs in the environment.

  • 26.
    Afvander, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Development of a working method for the study of a distillation process: Distillation of a multicomponent system2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 27.
    Agharbi, Mariam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Hva ønsker den norske kunden seg av helsetjenester i apotek?: Kartlegging og utforming av blodtrykksmåling som en etterspurt helsetjeneste i norske apotek.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 28.
    Aghbolagh, Mahdi Shahmohammadi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Meynaq, Mohammad Yaser Khani
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Shimizu, Kenichi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Aspects on mediated glucose oxidation at a supported cubic phase2017In: Bioelectrochemistry, ISSN 1567-5394, E-ISSN 1878-562X, Vol. 118, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A supported liquid crystalline cubic phase housing glucose oxidase on an electrode surface has been suggested as bio-anode in a biofuel. The purpose of this investigation is to clarify some aspect on the mediated enzymatic oxidation of glucose in such a bio-anode where the mediator ferrocene-carboxylic acid and glucose were dissolved in the solution. The enzyme glucose oxidase was housed in the water channels of the mono-olein cubic phase. The system was investigated with cyclic voltammetry at different scan rates and the temperature was varied between 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C. The diffusion coefficient of the mediator and also the film resistance was estimated showing a large decrease in the mass-transport properties as the temperature was decreased. The current from mediated oxidation of glucose at the electrode surface increased with decreasing film thickness. The transport of the mediator in the cubic phase was the rate-limiting step in the overall reaction, where the oxidation of glucose took place at the outer surface of the cubic phase.

  • 29.
    Aghester, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Hyperspektral bildanalys av pulverblandningar innehållande mannitol och natriumsalicylat: Effekt av partikelstorlek och blandningstid2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 30.
    Aglar, Öznur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Design and synthesis of inhibitors of the ADP ribosylating toxin ExoS: Targeting the Type III Secretion System (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 31. Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar
    et al.
    Job, Dominique
    Kieselbach, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Barkla, Bronwyn J.
    Chen, Sixue
    Deswal, Renu
    Luethje, Sabine
    Amalraj, Ramesh Sundar
    Tanou, Georgia
    Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser
    Cramer, Rainer
    Weckwerth, Wolfram
    Wienkoop, Stefanie
    Dunn, Michael J.
    Kim, Sun Tae
    Fukao, Yochiro
    Yonekura, Masami
    Zolla, Lello
    Rohila, Jai Singh
    Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon
    Masi, Antonio
    Wang, Tai
    Sarkar, Abhijit
    Agrawal, Raj
    Renaut, Jenny
    Rakwal, Randeep
    INPPO Actions and Recognition as a Driving Force for Progress in Plant Proteomics: Change of Guard, INPPO Update, and Upcoming Activities2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 21, p. 3093-3100Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) is a non-profit organization whose members are scientists involved or interested in plant proteomics. Since the publication of the first INPPO highlights in 2012, continued progress on many of the organization's mandates/goals has been achieved. Two major events are emphasized in this second INPPO highlights. First, the change of guard at the top, passing of the baton from Dominique Job, INPPO founding President to Ganesh Kumar Agrawal as the incoming President. Ganesh K. Agrawal, along with Dominique Job and Randeep Rakwal initiated the INPPO. Second, the most recent INPPO achievements and future targets, mainly the organization of first the INPPO World Congress in 2014, tentatively planned for Hamburg (Germany), are mentioned.

  • 32. Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar
    et al.
    Sarkar, Abhijit
    Agrawal, Raj
    Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser
    Tanou, Georgia
    Dunn, Michael J
    Kieselbach, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Cramer, Rainer
    Wienkoop, Stefanie
    Chen, Sixue
    Rafudeen, Mohammed Suhail
    Deswal, Renu
    Barkla, Bronwyn J
    Weckwerth, Wolfram
    Heazlewood, Joshua L
    Renaut, Jenny
    Job, Dominique
    Chakraborty, Niranjan
    Rakwal, Randeep
    Boosting the Globalization of Plant Proteomics through INPPO: Current Developments and Future Prospects2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) is a non-profit-organization consisting of people who are involved or interested in plant proteomics. INPPO is constantly growing in volume and activity, which is mostly due to the realization among plant proteomics researchers worldwide for the need of such a global platform. Their active participation resulted in the rapid growth within the first year of INPPO's official launch in 2011 via its website (www.inppo.com) and publication of the 'Viewpoint paper' in a special issue of PROTEOMICS (May 2011). Here, we will be highlighting the progress achieved in the year 2011 and the future targets for the year 2012 and onwards. INPPO has achieved a successful administrative structure, the Core Committee (CC; composed of President, Vice-President, and General Secretaries), Executive Council (EC), and General Body (GB) to achieve INPPO objectives. Various committees and subcommittees are in the process of being functionalized via discussion amongst scientists around the globe. INPPO's primary aim to popularize the plant proteomics research in biological sciences has also been recognized by PROTEOMICS where a section dedicated to plant proteomics has been introduced starting January 2012, following the very first issue of this journal devoted to plant proteomics in May 2011. To disseminate organizational activities to the scientific community, INPPO has launched a biannual (in January and July) newsletter entitled 'INPPO Express: News & Views' with the first issue published in January 2012. INPPO is also planning to have several activities in 2012, including programs within the Education Outreach committee in different countries, and the development of research ideas and proposals with priority on crop and horticultural plants, while keeping tight interactions with proteomics programs on model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, and Medicago truncatula. Altogether, the INPPO progress and upcoming activities are because of immense support, dedication, and hard work of all members of the INPPO community, and also due to the wide encouragement and support from the communities (scientific and non-scientific).

  • 33.
    Aguilar, Ximena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Folding and interaction studies of subunits in protein complexes2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteins function as worker molecules in the cell and their natural environment is crowded. How they fold in a cell-like environment and how they recognize their interacting partners in such conditions, are questions that underlie the work of this thesis.

    Two distinct subjects were investigated using a combination of biochemical- and biophysical methods. First, the unfolding/dissociation of a heptameric protein (cpn10) in the presence of the crowding agent Ficoll 70. Ficoll 70 was used to mimic the crowded environment in the cell and it has been used previously to study macromolecular crowding effects, or excluded volume effects, in protein folding studies. Second, the conformational changes upon interaction between the Mediator subunit Med25 and the transcription factor Dreb2a from Arabidopsis thaliana. Mediator is a transcriptional co-regulator complex which is conserved from yeast to humans. The molecular mechanisms of its action are however not entirely understood. It has been proposed that the Mediator complex conveys regulatory signals from promoter-bound transcription factors (activators/repressors) to the RNA polymerase II machinery through conformational rearrangements.

    The results from the folding study showed that cpn10 was stabilized in the presence of Ficoll 70 during thermal- and chemical induced unfolding (GuHCl). The thermal transition midpoint increased by 4°C, and the chemical midpoint by 0.5 M GuHCl as compared to buffer conditions. Also the heptamer-monomer dissociation was affected in the presence of Ficoll 70, the transition midpoint was lower in Ficoll 70 (3.1 μM) compared to in buffer (8.1 μM) thus indicating tighter binding in crowded conditions. The coupled unfolding/dissociation free energy for the heptamer increased by about 36 kJ/mol in Ficoll. Altogether, the results revealed that the stability effect on cpn10 due to macromolecular crowding was larger in the individual monomers (33%) than at the monomer-monomer interfaces (8%).

    The results from the interaction study indicated conformational changes upon interaction between the A. thaliana Med25 ACtivator Interaction Domain (ACID) and Dreb2a. Structural changes were probed to originate from unstructured Dreb2a and not from the Med25-ACID. Human Med25-ACID was also found to interact with the plant-specific Dreb2a, even though the ACIDs from human and A. thaliana share low sequence homology. Moreover, the human Med25-interacting transcription factor VP16 was found to interact with A. thaliana Med25. Finally, NMR, ITC and pull-down experiments showed that the unrelated transcription factors Dreb2a and

    VP16 interact with overlapping regions in the ACIDs of A. thaliana and human Med25.

    The results presented in this thesis contribute to previous reports in two different aspects. Firstly, they lend support to the findings that the intracellular environment affects the biophysical properties of proteins. It will therefore be important to continue comparing results between in vitro and cell-like conditions to measure the magnitude of such effects and to improve the understanding of protein folding and thereby misfolding of proteins in cells. Better knowledge of protein misfolding mechanisms is critical since they are associated to several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's. Secondly, our results substantiate the notion that transcription factors are able to bind multiple targets and that they gain structure upon binding. They also show that subunits of the conserved Mediator complex, despite low sequence homologies, retain a conserved structure and function when comparing evolutionary diverged species.

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  • 34.
    Aguilar, Ximena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Blomberg, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schleucher, Jurgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Björklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Interaction Studies of the Human and Arabidopsis thaliana Med25-ACID Proteins with the Herpes Simplex Virus VP16-and Plant-Specific Dreb2a Transcription Factors2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e98575-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mediator is an evolutionary conserved multi-protein complex present in all eukaryotes. It functions as a transcriptional coregulator by conveying signals from activators and repressors to the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. The Arabidopsis thaliana Med25 (aMed25) ACtivation Interaction Domain (ACID) interacts with the Dreb2a activator which is involved in plant stress response pathways, while Human Med25-ACID (hMed25) interacts with the herpes simplex virus VP16 activator. Despite low sequence similarity, hMed25-ACID also interacts with the plant-specific Dreb2a transcriptional activator protein. We have used GST pull-down-, surface plasmon resonance-, isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift experiments to characterize interactions between Dreb2a and VP16, with the hMed25 and aMed25-ACIDs. We found that VP16 interacts with aMed25-ACID with similar affinity as with hMed25-ACID and that the binding surface on aMed25-ACID overlaps with the binding site for Dreb2a. We also show that the Dreb2a interaction region in hMed25-ACID overlaps with the earlier reported VP16 binding site. In addition, we show that hMed25-ACID/Dreb2a and aMed25-ACID/Dreb2a display similar binding affinities but different binding energetics. Our results therefore indicate that interaction between transcriptional regulators and their target proteins in Mediator are less dependent on the primary sequences in the interaction domains but that these domains fold into similar structures upon interaction.

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  • 35.
    Aguilar, Ximena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Weise, Christoph
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sparrman, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wolf-Watz, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Macromolecular crowding extended to a heptameric system: the co-chaperonin protein 102011In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 50, no 14, p. 3034-3044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments on monomeric proteins have shown that macromolecular crowding can stabilize toward heat perturbation and also modulate native-state structure. To assess the effects of macromolecular crowding on unfolding of an oligomeric protein, we here tested the effects of the synthetic crowding agent Ficoll 70 on human cpn10 (GroES in E. coli), a heptameric protein consisting of seven identical β-barrel subunits assembling into a ring. Using far-UV circular dichroism (CD), tyrosine fluorescence, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and cross-linking experiments, we investigated thermal and chemical stability, as well as the heptamer-monomer dissociation constant, without and with crowding agent. We find that crowding shifts the heptamer-monomer equilibrium constant in the direction of the heptamer. The cpn10 heptamer is both thermally and thermodynamically stabilized in 300 mg/mL Ficoll 70 as compared to regular buffer conditions. Kinetic unfolding experiments show that the increased stability in crowded conditions, in part, is explained by slower unfolding rates. A thermodynamic cycle reveals that in presence of 300 mg/mL Ficoll the thermodynamic stability of each cpn10 monomer increases by over 30%, whereas the interfaces are stabilized by less than 10%. We also introduce a new approach to analyze the spectroscopic data that makes use of multiple wavelengths: this provides robust error estimates of thermodynamic parameters.

  • 36. Aguilera, Adriana Freites
    et al.
    Tolvanen, Pasi
    Heredia, Shuyana
    Muñoz, Marta González
    Samson, Tina
    Oger, Adrien
    Verove, Antoine
    Eränen, Kari
    Leveneur, Sebastien
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Industrial Chemistry & Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Salmi, Tapio
    Epoxidation of fatty acids and vegetable oils assisted by microwaves catalyzed by a cation exchange resin2018In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 3876-3886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epoxidation of oleic acid and cottonseed oil was conducted in a semibatch reactor with in-situ-formed percarboxylic acid (peracetic acid or perpropionic acid), using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent and carboxylic acid (acetic acid or propionic acid) as oxygen carriers. Amberlite IR-120 was implemented as the catalyst. The system was comprised of a loop reactor, where the mixture was pumped through a single-mode cavity in which microwave irradiation was introduced. A heat exchanger was integrated into the system to replace microwave heating, to compare the results obtained via microwave heating versus conventional heating. The catalyst loading effect was studied, as well as the influence of microwave irradiation and the implementation of the SpinChem rotating bed reactor (RBR), in hopes of decreasing the influence of the internal mass transfer. The application of microwave irradiation results in an improvement of the reaction yield in the absence of a catalyst.

  • 37. Aguilera, Adriana Freites
    et al.
    Tolvanen, Pasi
    Oger, Adrien
    Eränen, Kari
    Leveneur, Sébastien
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Turku-Åbo, Finland.
    Salmi, Tapio
    Screening of ion exchange resin catalysts for epoxidation of oleic acid under the influence of conventional and microwave heating2019In: Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), ISSN 0268-2575, E-ISSN 1097-4660, Vol. 94, no 9, p. 3020-3031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For many chemical systems, it is of great importance to find a durable, active and efficient catalyst that improves the process performance. Epoxidation of oleic acid with peracetic acid (Prilezhaev oxidation) was carried out in an isothermal loop reactor in the presence of heterogeneous catalysts. The kinetic experiments conducted under microwave heating (MW) were compared with identical experiments carried out under conventional (conductive/convective) heating. Extensive screening of heterogeneous catalysts was conducted and the influence of microwave irradiation on the reaction kinetics was studied. Several ion exchange resins were screened to explore their applicability and activity in the epoxidation of oleic acid. The perhydrolysis reaction (peracetic acid formed in situ from acetic acid and H2O2) was promoted with the use of various solid acid catalysts: Amberlite IR-120, Amberlyst 15, Smopex®, Dowex 50x8-100, Dowex 50x8-50, Dowex 50x2-100 and Nafion™.

    Results: From the selected group of catalysts, Dowex 50-x8100 and Dowex 50x8-50 produced the highest yield of epoxidized oil. Only minor differences in the reactant conversion and the product yield were found in the experiments carried out under microwave exposure compared to the conventionally heated experiments in the presence of several ion exchange resins.

    Conclusions: The catalytic effect was much more prominent than the microwave effect, because the solid acid catalysts enhanced the slow step of the process, the perhydrolysis of acetic acid. The catalytic effect was very dominant and a considerable improvement of the oleic acid conversion and the epoxide yield was observed in the presence of the top-performing catalysts.

  • 38. Ahl, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Lindberg, Mikael J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry.
    Tibell, Lena A E
    Coexpression of yeast copper chaperone (yCCS) and CuZn-superoxide dismutases in Escherichia coli yields protein with high copper contents2004In: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 311-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To fully understand the function of the Cu- and Zn-containing superoxide dismutases in normal and disordered cells, it is essential to study protein variants with full metal contents. We describe the use of an Escherichia coli-based expression system for the overproduction of human intracellular wild type CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), the CuZnSOD variant F50E/G51E (monomeric), two amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-related mutant CuZnSOD variants (D90A and G93A), and PseudoEC-SOD, all with high Cu contents. This system is based on coexpression of the SOD variants with the yeast copper chaperone yCCS during growth in a medium supplemented with Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The recombinant SOD enzymes were all found in the cytosol and represented 30-50% of the total bacterial protein. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity and active enzymes were obtained in high yield. The resulting proteins were characterized through immunochemical reactivity and specific activity analyses, in conjunction with mass-, photo-, and atomic absorption-spectroscopy.

  • 39.
    Ahlinder, Jon
    et al.
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Elin
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mats
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Thelaus, Johanna
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oligotyping reveals divergent responses of predation resistant bacteria to aquatic productivity and plankton compositionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Predation-resistance has been suggested to be a key for persistence of pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments. Little is known about driving factors for different types of protozoa resistant bacteria (PRB). We studied if presence of PRB is linked to specific plankton taxa, the aquatic nutrient state, or predation pressure on bacteria. Nineteen freshwater systems were sampled and analyzed for PRB, plankton composition and physicochemical variables. Three PRB genera were identified; Pseudomonas, Mycobacterium and Rickettsia. Use of minimum entropy decomposition algorithm and phylogenetic analysis showed that different nodes (representing OTUs of high taxonomic resolution) matched to environmental isolates of the three genera. Links between the PRB genera and specific plankton taxa were found, but showed different relationships depending on if 18S rRNA OTU or microscopy data were used in the analysis. Mycobacterium spp. was negatively correlated to aquatic nutrient state, while Pseudomonas showed the opposite pattern. Rickettsia spp. was positively related to predation pressure on bacteria. Both Mycobacterium and Rickettsia were more abundant in systems with high eukaryotic diversity, while Pseudomonas occurred abundantly in waters with low prokaryotic diversity. The different drivers may be explained by varying ecological strategies, where Mycobacterium and Rickettsia are slow growing and have an intracellular life style, while Pseudomonas is fast growing and opportunistic. Here we give an insight to the possibilities of newly advanced methods such as sequencing and oligotyping to link potential pathogens with biomarkers. This as a tool to assist predictions of the occurrence and persistence of environmental pathogens.

  • 40.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Formic and Levulinic Acid from Cellulose via Heterogeneous Catalysis2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical industry of today is under increased pressure to develop novel green materials, bio-fuels as well as sustainable chemicals for the chemical industry. Indeed, the endeavour is to move towards more eco-friendly cost efficient production processes and technologies and chemical transformation of renewables has a central role considering the future sustainable supply of chemicals and energy needed for societies. In the Nordic countries, the importance of pulping and paper industry has been particularly pronounced and the declining European demand on these products as a result of our digitalizing world has forced the industry to look at alternative sources of revenue and profitability. In this thesis, the production of levulinic and formic acid from biomass and macromolecules has been studied. Further, the optimum reaction conditions as well as the influence of the catalyst and biomass type were also discussed.

    Nordic sulphite and sulphate (Kraft) cellulose originating from two Nordic pulp mills were used as raw materials in the catalytic synthesis of green platform chemicals, levulinic and formic acids, respectively. The catalyst of choice used in this study was a macro-porous, cationic ion-exchange resin, Amberlyst 70, for which the optimal reaction conditions leading to best yields were determined. Cellulose from Nordic pulp mills were used as raw materials in the catalytic one-pot synthesis of ‘green’ levulinic and formic acid. The kinetic experiments were performed in a temperature range of 150–200 °C and an initial substrate concentration regime ranging from 0.7 to 6.0 wt %. It was concluded that the most important parameters in the one-pot hydrolysis of biomass were the reaction temperature, initial reactant concentration, acid type as well as the raw material applied. The reaction route includes dehydration of glucose to hydroxymethylfurfural as well as its further rehydration to formic and levulinic acids. The theoretical maximum yield can hardly be obtained due to formation of humins. For this system, maximum yields of 59 mol % and 68 mol % were obtained for formic and levulinic acid, respectively. The maximum yields were separately obtained in a straight-forward conversion system only containing cellulose, water and the heterogeneous catalyst. These yields were achieved at a reaction temperature of 180 °C and an initial cellulose intake of 0.7 wt % and belong to the upper range for solid catalysts so far presented in the literature.

    The reaction network of the various chemical species involved was investigated and a simple mechanistic approach involving first order reaction kinetics was developed. The concept introduces a one-pot procedure providing a feasible route to green platform chemicals obtained via conversion of coniferous soft wood pulp to levulinic and formic acids, respectively. The model was able to describe the behaviour of the system in a satisfactory manner (degree of explanation 97.8 %). Since the solid catalyst proved to exhibit good mechanical strength under the experimental conditions applied here and a one-pot procedure providing a route to green platform chemicals was developed. A simplified reaction network of the various chemical species involved was investigated and a mechanistic approach involving first order reaction kinetics was developed.

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  • 41.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ajaikumar, Samikannu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Larsson, William
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    One-pot catalytic conversion of Nordic pulp media into green platform chemicals2013In: Applied Catalysis A: General, ISSN 0926-860X, E-ISSN 1873-3875, Vol. 454, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, both sulphite and sulphate (Kraft) cellulose from Nordic pulp mills were used as raw materials in the catalytic one-pot synthesis of green platform chemicals, levulinic and formic acids, respectively. The catalyst of choice was a macro-porous, cationic ion-exchange resin, Amberlyst 70. The optimal reaction conditions were determined and the influence of various gas atmospheres was investigated. The maximum yields of 53% formic acid and 57% of levulinic acid were separately obtained in a straight-forward conversion system only containing cellulose, water and the heterogeneous catalyst. The concept introduces a one-pot procedure providing a feasible route to green platform chemicals obtained via conversion of coniferous soft wood pulp to levulinic and formic acids, respectively.

  • 42.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mäki-Arvela, Päivi
    Åbo Akademi.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Åbo Akademi University, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Industrial Chemistry & Reaction Engineering., Finland.
    Macro-molecules as a source of levulinic acid2014In: International Review of Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2035-1755, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 44-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of levulinic acid from biomass and macromolecules has been reviewed. It was concluded that the most important parameters in the one-pot hydrolysis of biomass, also including dehydration of glucose to hydroxymethylfurfural as well as its further rehydration to formic and levulinic acids, respectively, are the reaction temperature, initial reactant concentration, acid type as well as the raw material applied. The theoretical maximum yield can hardly be obtained due to formation of humins. Further, the optimum reaction conditions as well as the influence of the catalyst and biomass type are also discussed.

  • 43.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Samikannu, Ajaikumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Larsson, William
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wärnå, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Salmi, Tapio
    Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Reaction Network upon One-pot Catalytic Conversion of Pulp2013In: / [ed] Sauro Pierucci, Jiří J. Klemeš, AIDIC - associazione italiana di ingegneria chimica, 2013, Vol. 32, p. 649-654Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic sulphite and sulphate (Kraft) cellulose originating from Nordic pulp mills were used as raw materials in the catalytic synthesis of green platform chemicals, levulinic and formic acids, respectively. The catalyst of choice used in this study was a macro-porous, cationic ion-exchange resin Amberlyst 70 for which the optimal reaction conditions leading to best yields were determined. For this system, maximum yields of 53 mol-% and 57 mol-% were obtained for formic and levulinic acid, respectively. The reaction network of the various chemical species involved was investigated and a simple mechanistic approach involving first order reaction kinetics was developed. The prototype model was able to describe the behaviour of the system in a satisfactory manner.

  • 44.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Samikannu, Ajaikumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic materials2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wärnå, Johan
    Åbo Akademi.
    Salmi, Tapio
    Åbo Akademi.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Experimental and Kinetic Modelling Studies upon Conversion of Nordic Pulp into Levulinic AcidManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, sulphite cellulose from a Swedish pulp mill was applied as the raw material upon catalytic, one-pot synthesis of green platform chemicals – levulinic and formic acids. Cationic ion-exchange resin, Amberlyst 70, was the catalyst of choice and the optimal reaction conditions leading to best yields were determined. The kinetic experiments were performed in a temperature range of 180–200 °C and an initial substrate concentration regime ranging from 0.7 to 6.0 wt %. For this system, maximum theoretical yields of around 59 mol % and 68 mol % were obtained for formic and levulinic acid, respectively. These yields were achieved at a reaction temperature of 180 °C and an initial cellulose intake of 0.7 wt %. A simplified reaction network of the various chemical species involved was investigated and a mechanistic approach involving first order reaction kinetics was developed. The model was able to describe the behaviour of the system in a satisfactory manner (degree of explanation 97.8 %). Since the solid catalyst proved to exhibit good mechanical strength under the experimental conditions applied here, the concept introduces a one-pot procedure providing a route to green platform chemicals from coniferous soft wood pulp to produce levulinic and formic acids, respectively.

  • 46.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wärnå, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University,Turku, Finland.
    Salmi, Tapio
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University,Turku, Finland.
    Heterogeneously catalyzed conversion of nordic pulp to levulinic and formic acids2016In: Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms and Catalysis, ISSN 1878-5190, E-ISSN 1878-5204, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 415-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, one-pot conversion of cellulose to platform chemicals, formic and levulinic acids was demonstrated. The catalyst selected was an affordable, acidic ion-exchange resin, Amberlyst 70, whereas the cellulose used was sulfite cellulose delivered by a Swedish pulp mill. Furthermore, in an attempt to better understand the complex hydrolysis network of the polysaccharide, kinetic experiments were carried out to pinpoint the optimal reaction conditions with an initial substrate concentration of 0.7–6.0 wt% and a temperature range of 180–200 °C. Higher temperatures could not be used due to the limitations in the thermal stability of the catalyst. Overall, maximum theoretical yields of 59 and 68 mol% were obtained for formic and levulinic acid, respectively. The parameters allowing for the best performance were reaction temperature of 180 °C and initial cellulose concentration of 0.7 wt%. After studying the behavior of the system, a simplified reaction network in line with a mechanistic approach was developed and found to follow first order reaction kinetics. A satisfactory fit of the model to the experimental data was achieved (97.8 % degree of explanation). The catalyst chosen exhibited good mechanical strength under the experimental conditions and thus, a route providing green platform chemicals from soft wood pulp from coniferous trees (mixture of Scots Pine and Norway Spruce) was demonstrated.

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  • 47.
    Ahmad, Bayar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Apotekverksamhetens regler i Holland: – skillnader och likheter mellan Sverige och Holland2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Apotekverksamhetens regler i Holland
  • 48.
    Ahmad, Bayar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Apotekverksamhetens regler i Holland – skillnader och likheter mellan Sverige och Holland2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 49.
    Ahmad, Raghad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sambandet mellan neuroleptika och det metabola syndromet2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 50.
    Ahmed, Zina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Poly-ADP ribos polymeras (PARP) inhibitorers effekt på bröstcancer: Poly-ADP ribos polymeras (PARP) inhibitorers effekt på bröstcancer2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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