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  • 1. Araujo, Pedro
    et al.
    Tilahun, Ephrem
    Zeng, Yingxu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    A novel strategy for discriminating marine oils by using the positional distribution (sn-1, sn-2, sn-3) of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in triacylglycerols2018In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 182, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel strategy for discriminating genuine and adulterated marine oils is proposed. The strategy consists of i) determining the stereospecific distribution (sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3) of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA) on the backbone of triacylglycerols by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; ii) transforming the qualitative stereospecific information into quantitative data by means of a novel strategy; iii) analyzing the transformed data by principal component analysis. The proposed strategy was tested on pure oils (seal, salmon, cod liver, sandeel, blue whiting, herring), a mixture of blue whiting, herring, sandeel and Norway pout and some intentionally adulterated oils. In addition, some published krill oil data were analyzed to confirm the reliability of the new approach.

  • 2. Armstrong, Ben
    et al.
    Sera, Francesco
    Vicedo-Cabrera, Ana Maria
    Abrutzky, Rosana
    Oudin Åström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Bell, Michelle L
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, Micheline
    Correa, Patricia Matus
    Dang, Tran Ngoc
    Diaz, Magali Hurtado
    Dung, Do Van
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Goodman, Patrick
    Guo, Yue-Liang Leon
    Guo, Yuming
    Hashizume, Masahiro
    Honda, Yasushi
    Indermitte, Ene
    Íñiguez, Carmen
    Kan, Haidong
    Kim, Ho
    Kyselý, Jan
    Lavigne, Eric
    Michelozzi, Paola
    Orru, Hans
    Ortega, Nicolás Valdés
    Pascal, Mathilde
    Ragettli, Martina S
    Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento
    Schwartz, Joel
    Scortichini, Matteo
    Seposo, Xerxes
    Tobias, Aurelio
    Tong, Shilu
    Urban, Aleš
    De la Cruz Valencia, César
    Zanobetti, Antonella
    Zeka, Ariana
    Gasparrini, Antonio
    The Role of Humidity in Associations of High Temperature with Mortality: A Multicountry, Multicity Study2019In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 127, no 9, article id 097007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is strong experimental evidence that physiologic stress from high temperatures is greater if humidity is higher. However, heat indices developed to allow for this have not consistently predicted mortality better than dry-bulb temperature.

    Objectives: We aimed to clarify the potential contribution of humidity an addition to temperature in predicting daily mortality in summer by using a large multicountry dataset.

    Methods: In 445 cities in 24 countries, we fit a time-series regression model for summer mortality with a distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) for temperature (up to lag 3) and supplemented this with a range of terms for relative humidity (RH) and its interaction with temperature. City-specific associations were summarized using meta-analytic techniques.

    Results: Adding a linear term for RH to the temperature term improved fit slightly, with an increase of 23% in RH (the 99th percentile anomaly) associated with a 1.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 1.3] decrease in mortality. Allowing curvature in the RH term or adding terms for interaction of RH with temperature did not improve the model fit. The humidity-related decreased risk was made up of a positive coefficient at lag 0 outweighed by negative coefficients at lags of 1–3 d. Key results were broadly robust to small model changes and replacing RH with absolute measures of humidity. Replacing temperature with apparent temperature, a metric combining humidity and temperature, reduced goodness of fit slightly.

    Discussion:The absence of a positive association of humidity with mortality in summer in this large multinational study is counter to expectations from physiologic studies, though consistent with previous epidemiologic studies finding little evidence for improved prediction by heat indices. The result that there was a small negative average association of humidity with mortality should be interpreted cautiously; the lag structure has unclear interpretation and suggests the need for future work to clarify.

  • 3.
    Backman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Eriksson, Berne
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Eklund, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Severe asthma: A population study perspective2019In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 819-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Severe asthma is a considerable challenge for patients, health care professionals and society. Few studies have estimated the prevalence of severe asthma according to modern definitions of which none based on a population study.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe characteristics and estimate the prevalence of severe asthma in a large adult population-based asthma cohort followed for 10-28 years.

    METHODS: N=1006 subjects with asthma participated in a follow-up during 2012-14, when 830 (mean age 59y, 56% women) still had current asthma. Severe asthma was defined according to three internationally well-known criteria: the ATS workshop definition from 2000 used in the US Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP), the 2014 ATS/ERS Task force definition and the GINA 2017. All subjects with severe asthma according to any of these criteria were undergoing respiratory specialist care, and were also contacted by telephone to verify treatment adherence.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of severe asthma according to the three definitions was 3.6% (US SARP), 4.8% (ERS/ATS Taskforce), and 6.1% (GINA) among subjects with current asthma. Although all were using high ICS doses and other maintenance treatment, >40% had uncontrolled asthma according to the asthma control test. Severe asthma was related to age >50 years, nasal polyposis, impaired lung function, sensitization to aspergillus, and tended to be more common in women. Further, neutrophils in blood significantly discriminated severe asthma from other asthma.

    CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Severe asthma differed significantly from other asthma in terms of demographic, clinical and inflammatory characteristics, results suggesting possibilities for improved treatment regimens of severe asthma. The prevalence of severe asthma in this asthma cohort was 4-6%, corresponding to approximately 0.5% of the general population.

  • 4.
    Ballin, Marcel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundberg, Emmy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sörlén, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hult, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Sport Science, School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Effects of interval training on quality of life and cardiometabolic risk markers in older adults: a randomized controlled trial2019In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 14, p. 1589-1599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore the effects of 10 weeks of progressive vigorous interval training as a single intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and cardiometabolic risk markers in centrally obese 70-year-old individuals.

    Participants and methods: A randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT03450655) including seventy-seven community-dwelling 70-year-old men and women with central obesity defined as > 1 kg visceral adipose tissue for women and > 2 kg for men. Participants randomized to the intervention group were offered a 10-week progressive vigorous interval training program performed three times per week. Control subjects were asked to maintain their daily living and routines throughout the trial. All participants in both groups had received tailored lifestyle recommendations focused on diet and physical activity at one occasion within 12 months prior to trial initiation. Prespecified outcome measures included: changes in HRQoL using the Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36), blood pressure; resting heart rate (HR) and blood lipids. All analyses were conducted on an intention-to-treat basis.

    Results: The intervention resulted in significant effects on the SF-36 mental component summary (MCS) score and the mental health (MH) subscale (P< 0.05 for both), when compared to the control group. Specifically, the intervention group increased their MCS score by 6.3 points (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3–12.3) and their MH score by 6.0 points (95% CI = 1.7–10.4) compared to the control group. Moreover, significant effects were seen on resting HR, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (P<0.05 for all).

    Conclusion: It was shown that 10 weeks of vigorous interval training as a single intervention was sufficient to improve mental aspects of HRQoL in older individuals with central obesity, which is a critical aspect of healthy ageing. Positive effects were seen also on cardiometabolic risk markers.

  • 5.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Björk, Sabine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Bergland, Ådel
    Winblad, Bengt
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing & Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The Thriving of Older People Assessment Scale: Psychometric evaluation and short‐form development2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the psychometric properties and performance of the 32‐item Thriving of Older People Assessment Scale (TOPAS) and to explore reduction into a short‐form.

    Background: The 32‐item TOPAS has been used in studies of place‐related well‐being as a positive measure in long‐term care to assess nursing home resident thriving; however, item redundancy has not previously been explored.

    Design: Cross‐sectional.

    Method: Staff members completed the 32‐item TOPAS as proxy‐raters for a random sample of Swedish nursing home residents (N = 4,831) between November 2013 and September 2014. Reliability analysis, exploratory factor analysis and item response theory‐based analysis were undertaken. Items were systematically identified for reduction using statistical and theoretical analysis. Correlation testing, means comparison and model fit evaluation confirmed scale equivalence.

    Results: Psychometric properties of the 32‐item TOPAS were satisfactory and several items were identified for scale reduction. The proposed short‐form TOPAS exhibited a high level of internal consistency (α=0.90) and strong correlation (r=0.98) to the original scale, while also retaining diversity among items in terms of factor structure and item difficulties.

    Conclusion: The 32‐item and short‐form TOPAS' indicated sound validity and reliability to measure resident thriving in the nursing home context.

    Impact: There is a lack of positive life‐world measures for use in nursing homes. The short‐form TOPAS indicated sound validity and reliability to measure resident thriving, providing a feasible measure with enhanced functionality for use in aged care research, assessments and care planning for health promoting purposes in nursing homes.

  • 6.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Medicine.
    Ekman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Pharmaco-fMRI in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial With the Monoaminergic Stabilizer (-)-OSU61622019In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 189-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of monoaminergic stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 on brain activity, as measured by blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in patients in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury suffering from fatigue.

    SETTING: Neurorehabilitation clinic.

    PARTICIPANTS: Patients with traumatic brain injury received either placebo (n = 24) or active treatment (n = 28). Healthy controls (n = 27) went through fMRI examination at one point and were used in sensitivity analysis on normalization of BOLD response.

    DESIGN: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design.

    MAIN MEASURES: Effects on BOLD signal changes from before to after treatment during performance of a fatiguing attention task.

    RESULTS: The fMRI results revealed treatment effects within the right occipitotemporal cortex and the right orbitofrontal cortex. In these regions, the BOLD response was normalized relative to healthy controls at the postintervention fMRI session. No effects were seen in regions in which we previously observed activity differences between patients and healthy controls while performing this fMRI task, such as the striatum.

    CONCLUSION: (-)-OSU6162 treatment had influences on functional brain activity, although the normalized regional BOLD response was observed in regions that were not a priori hypothesized to be sensitive to this particular treatment, and was not accompanied by any effects on in-scanner test performance or on fatigue.

  • 7.
    Bergman, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wahlström, Viktoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stomby, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Otten, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lanthén, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Renklint, Rebecka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Waling, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Sörlin, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Levine, James A.
    Department of Endocrinology, The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Fondation IPSEN, Paris, France.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Treadmill workstations in office workers who are overweight or obese: a randomised controlled trial2018In: The Lancet Public Health, ISSN 2468-2667, Vol. 3, no 11, article id e523-e535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Treadmill workstations that enable office workers to walk on a treadmill while working at their computers might increase physical activity in offices, but long-term effects are unknown. We therefore investigated whether treadmill workstations in offices increased daily walking time.

    Methods: We did a randomised controlled trial of healthy office workers who were either overweight or obese. We recruited participants from 13 different companies, which comprised 17 offices, in Umeå, Sweden. We included people who were aged 40-67 years, had sedentary work tasks, and had a body-mass index (BMI) between 25 kg/m2 and 40 kg/m2. After the baseline measurement, we stratified participants by their BMI (25-30 kg/m2 and >30 to 40 kg/m2); subsequently, an external statistician randomly assigned these participants (1:1) to either the intervention group (who received treadmill workstations for optional use) or the control group (who continued to work at their sit-stand desks as usual). Participants in the intervention group received reminders in boosting emails sent out to them at four occasions during the study period. Researchers were masked to group assignment until after analysis of the primary outcome. After the baseline measurement, participants were not masked to group belongings. The primary outcome was total daily walking time at weekdays and weekends, measured at baseline, 2 months, 6 months, 10 months, and 13 months with the accelerometer activPAL (PAL Technologies, Glasgow, UK), which was worn on the thigh of participants for 24 h a day for 7 consecutive days. We used an intention-to-treat approach for our analyses. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01997970, and is closed to new participants.

    Findings: Between Nov 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, a total of 80 participants were recruited and enrolled (n=40 in both the intervention and control groups). Daily walking time during total time awake at weekdays increased between baseline and 13 months by 18 min (95% CI 9 to 26) in the intervention group and 1 min (-7 to 9) in the control group (difference 22 min [95% CI 7 to 37], pinteraction=0·00045); for weekend walking, the change from baseline to 13 months was 5 min (-8 to 18) in the intervention group and 8 min (-5 to 21) in the control group (difference -1 min [-19 to 17]; pinteraction=0·00045). Neither measure met our predetermined primary outcome of 30 min difference in total walking time between the intervention and control group, so the primary outcome of the trial was not met. One adverse event was reported in a participant who accidently stepped on their Achilles tendon.

    Interpretation: In a sedentary work environment, treadmill workstations result in a statistically significant but smaller-than-expected increase in daily walking time. Future studies need to investigate how increasing physical activity at work might have potentially compensatory effects on non-work activity.

  • 8.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, UiT Arctic University of Norway, Postboks 1621, 9509, Alta, Norway..
    Hommel, A.
    Department of Care Sciences, Malmö University, 20506, Malmö, Sweden..
    Kivipelto, M.
    Division of Clinical geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Plan 7, 14183, Huddinge, Sweden. Research and Development Unit, Stockholm Sjukhem, Mariebergsgatan 22, 11219, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bisphosphonates and mortality: confounding in observational studies?2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Numerous observational studies suggest that bisphosphonates reduce mortality. This study showed that bisphosphonate use is associated with lower mortality within days of treatment, although the association was not significant until the second week. Such an early association is consistent with confounding, although an early treatment effect cannot be ruled out.

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine whether confounding explains why numerous observational studies show that bisphosphonate use is associated with lower mortality. To this end, we examined how soon after treatment initiation a lower mortality rate can be observed. We hypothesized that, due to confounding, the association would be observed immediately.

    Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of hip fracture patients discharged from Swedish hospitals between 1 July 2006 and 31 December 2015. The data covered 260,574 hip fracture patients and were obtained from the Swedish Hip Fracture Register and national registers. Of the 260,574 patients, 49,765 met all eligibility criteria and 10,178 were pair matched (bisphosphonate users to controls) using time-dependent propensity scores. The matching variables were age, sex, diagnoses, prescription medications, type of hip fracture, type of surgical procedure, known or suspected dementia, and physical functioning status.

    Results: Over a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 2922 of the 10,178 matched patients died. The mortality rate was 7.9 deaths per 100 person-years in bisphosphonate users and 9.4 deaths in controls, which corresponded to a 15% lower mortality rate in bisphosphonate users (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.79–0.91). The risk of death was lower in bisphosphonate users from day 6 of treatment, although the association was not significant until the second week.

    Conclusion: Bisphosphonate use was associated with lower mortality within days of treatment initiation. This finding is consistent with confounding, although an early treatment effect cannot be ruled out.

  • 9.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, UiT Arctic University of Norway, Postboks 1621, 9509, Alta, Norway.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Epidemiology of osteonecrosis among older adults in Sweden2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 965-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: This study estimated the incidence of osteonecrosis in a Swedish, nationwide cohort of older adults. Osteonecrosis was approximately 10 times more common than in previous studies. The strongest risk factors were dialysis, hip fracture, osteomyelitis, and organ transplantation, but only hip fractures could have contributed substantially to the disease burden.

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of osteonecrosis in a Swedish, nationwide cohort of older adults and in a large number of risk groups in that cohort.

    Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we included everyone who was aged 50 years or older and who was living in Sweden on 31 December 2005. We used Swedish national databases to collect data about prescription medication use, diagnosed medical conditions, and performed medical and surgical procedures. The study outcome was diagnosis of primary or secondary osteonecrosis at any skeletal site. The strength of risk factors was assessed using age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs).

    Results: The study cohort comprised 3,338,463 adults. The 10-year risk of osteonecrosis was 0.4% (n = 13,425), and the incidence rate was 4.7 cases/10000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6 to 4.7 cases). The strongest risk factors for osteonecrosis were hip fracture (SIR, 7.98; 95% CI, 7.69–8.27), solid organ transplantation (SIR, 7.14; 95% CI, 5.59–8.99), dialysis (SIR, 6.65; 95% CI, 5.62–7.81), and osteomyelitis (SIR, 6.43; 95% CI, 5.70–7.23). A history of hip fracture was present in 21.7% of cases of osteonecrosis, but osteomyelitis, dialysis, and solid organ transplantation were present in only 0.5 to 2% of cases.

    Conclusions: Osteonecrosis was approximately 10 times more common than a small number of previous population-based studies have suggested. The strongest risk factors for osteonecrosis were dialysis, hip fracture, osteomyelitis, and solid organ transplantation, but only hip fractures could have contributed substantially to the disease burden.

  • 10.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Overestimation of the Limitations of Randomized Controlled Trials2019In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bodén, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Shivappa, Nitin
    Hébert, James R
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Inflammation-related mechanisms may contribute to the link between diet and cancer. We sought to investigate the inflammatory impact of diet on cancer risk using the Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and an adapted Mediterranean diet score (MDS).

    METHODS: This population-based, prospective cohort study used self-reported dietary data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, including 100,881 participants, of whom 35,393 had repeated measures. Associations between dietary patterns and cancer risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. We also used restricted cubic splines to test for potential non-linear associations.

    RESULTS: A total of 9,250 incident cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 15 years. The two dietary patterns were moderately correlated to each other and had similar associations with cancer risk, predominantly lung cancer in men (DII per tertile decrease: Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (0.66-0.99), MDS per tertile increase: HR 0.86 (0.72-1.03)), and gastric cancer in men (DII: 0.73 (0.53-0.99), MDS: 0.73 (0.56-0.96)). Associations were, in general, found to be linear. We found no longitudinal association between 10-year change in diet and cancer risk.

    CONCLUSION: We confirm small, but consistent and statistically significant associations between a more anti-inflammatory or healthier diet and reduced risk of cancer, including a lower risk of lung and gastric cancer in men. The dietary indexes produced similar associations with respect to the risk of cancer.

  • 12.
    Bråbäck, Lennart
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Grandmaternal smoking during pregnancy and asthma in grandchildren2019In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 144, no 2, article id 624Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Clendenen, Tess V.
    et al.
    Ge, Wenzhen
    Koenig, Karen L.
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Brinton, Louise A.
    Darvishian, Farbod
    Dorgan, Joanne F.
    Eliassen, A. Heather
    Falk, Roni T.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hankinson, Susan E.
    Hoffman-Bolton, Judith
    Key, Timothy J.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Nichols, Hazel B.
    Sandler, Dale P.
    Schoemaker, Minouk J.
    Sluss, Patrick M.
    Sund, Malin
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Visvanathan, Kala
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Liu, Mengling
    Breast cancer risk prediction in women aged 35-50 years: impact of including sex hormone concentrations in the Gail model2019In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 21, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Models that accurately predict risk of breast cancer are needed to help younger women make decisions about when to begin screening. Premenopausal concentrations of circulating anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), a biomarker of ovarian reserve, and testosterone have been positively associated with breast cancer risk in prospective studies. We assessed whether adding AMH and/or testosterone to the Gail model improves its prediction performance for women aged 35-50.

    Methods: In a nested case-control study including ten prospective cohorts (1762 invasive cases/1890 matched controls) with pre-diagnostic serum/plasma samples, we estimated relative risks (RR) for the biomarkers and Gail risk factors using conditional logistic regression and random-effects meta-analysis. Absolute risk models were developed using these RR estimates, attributable risk fractions calculated using the distributions of the risk factors in the cases from the consortium, and population-based incidence and mortality rates. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminatory accuracy of the models with and without biomarkers.

    Results: The AUC for invasive breast cancer including only the Gail risk factor variables was 55.3 (95% CI 53.4, 57.1). The AUC increased moderately with the addition of AMH (AUC 57.6, 95% CI 55.7, 59.5), testosterone (AUC 56.2, 95% CI 54.4, 58.1), or both (AUC 58.1, 95% CI 56.2, 59.9). The largest AUC improvement (4.0) was among women without a family history of breast cancer.

    Conclusions: AMH and testosterone moderately increase the discriminatory accuracy of the Gail model among women aged 35-50. We observed the largest AUC increase for women without a family history of breast cancer, the group that would benefit most from improved risk prediction because early screening is already recommended for women with a family history.

  • 14.
    Forsell, Karl
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden..
    Liljelind, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Ljungkvist, Göran
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden..
    Nordlinder, Rolf
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden..
    Andersson, Eva
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Ralph
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden..
    Benzene Exposure and Biomarkers in Alveolar Air and Urine Among Deck Crews on Tankers Transporting Gasoline2019In: Annals of work exposures and health, ISSN 2398-7316, article id wxz055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Increased rates of leukaemia have been found among tanker crews. Occupational exposures to the leukomogen benzene during loading, unloading, and tank cleaning are possible causes. Studies on older types of tankers carrying gasoline with most handling being done manually have revealed important exposures to benzene. Our study explores benzene exposures on tankers with both automatic and manual systems. Correlations between benzene exposure and benzene in alveolar air (AlvBe), benzene in urine (UBe), and trans,trans-muconic acid (ttMA) in urine were investigated.

    METHODS: Forty-three male seafarers (22 deck crewmembers and 21 not on deck) on five Swedish different product and chemical tankers transporting 95- or 98-octane gasoline were investigated between 1995 and 1998. The tankers used closed systems for the loading and unloading of gasoline but stripping and tank cleaning were done manually. Benzene in respiratory air was measured using personal passive dosimeters during a 4-h work shift. Samples for biomarker analyses were collected pre- and post-shift. Smoking did occur and crewmembers did not use any respiratory protection during work.

    RESULTS: The average 4-h benzene exposure level for exposed was 0.45 mg m-3 and for non-exposed 0.02 mg m-3. Benzene exposure varied with type of work (range 0.02-143 mg m-3). AlvBe, UBe, and ttMA were significantly higher in post-shift samples among exposed and correlated with exposure level (r = 0.89, 0.74, and 0.57, respectively). Smoking did not change the level of significance among exposed.

    DISCUSSION: Benzene in alveolar air, unmetabolized benzene, and ttMA in urine are potential biomarkers for occupational benzene exposure. Biomarkers were detectable in non-exposed, suggesting benzene exposure even for other work categories on board tankers. Work on tankers carrying gasoline with more or less closed handling of the cargo may still lead to significant benzene exposure for deck crewmembers, and even exceed the Swedish Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL; 8-h time-weighted average [TWA]) of 1.5 mg m-3.

  • 15.
    Hagenbjörk, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Kvävedioxid- och kväveoxidhalter i Umeå: Sammanställning av mätningar gjorda med diffusionsprovtagare mellan november 2009 och december 20182019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mätning av kvävedioxid (NO2) och kväveoxider (NOx) har utförts med diffusionsprovtagare vid två tillfällen (sommartid respektive vintertid) på 41 platser i Umeå tätort under 2018. Två veckomätningar har gjorts varje år på dessa platser sedan 2009 och totalt nitton mätningar har utförts på samma sätt över åren. Mätplatsernas geografiska läge kan ha varierat något över tid, provtagare har ibland plockats ned av förbipasserande varför alla mätplatser inte har maximalt antal mätningar. Det finns 25 mätplatser där mätningar har gjorts vid alla sjutton tillfällen.De högsta halterna har uppmätts på trafikerade platser under vinterhalvåret p.g.a. större utsläpp och stillastående luft, s.k. inversion. Vid mätningarna 2018 uppmättes de högsta halterna NO2 både sommartid och vintertid vid en husfasad belägen på Västra Esplanaden, centralt i Umeå (22 μg/m3 respektive 54 μg/m3). NOx-halten sommartid var högst vid samma mätpunkt på Västra Esplanaden (54 μg/m3) medan halten vid vintermätningen var högst vid mätvagnen vid Västra Esplanaden (158 μg/m3).

  • 16. Huseinovic, Ena
    et al.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Changes in food intake patterns during 2000–2007 and 2008–2016 in the population-based Northern Sweden Diet Database2019In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 18, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Food intake patterns provide a summary of dietary intake. Few studies have examined trends in food intake patterns over time in large, population-based studies. We examined food intake patterns and related sociodemographic and individual characteristics in the large Northern Sweden Diet Database during the two time windows 2000–2007 and 2008–2016.

    Methods: In total, 100 507 participants (51% women) who had filled in a 64-item food frequency questionnaire and provided background and sociodemographic data between 2000 and 2016 were included. Food intake patterns were evaluated for women and men separately for the two time windows 2000–2007 and 2008–2016, respectively. Latent class analysis was used to identify distinct, latent clusters based on 40 food groups.

    Results: Among both women and men, a greater proportion of participants were classified into food intake patterns characterized by high-fat spread and high-fat dairy during 2008–2016 compared to 2000–2007. In the earlier time window, these high-fat clusters were related to lower educational level and smoking. Simultaneously, the proportion of women and men classified into a cluster characterized by high intake of fruit, vegetables, and fibre decreased from the earlier to the later time window.

    Conclusion: From a public health perspective, the increase in clusters with a high conditional mean for high-fat spread and high-fat dairy and decrease in clusters with a high conditional mean for fruit and vegetables, during the time period 2008–2016 compared to 2000–2007, is worrisome as it indicates a shift away from the recommended food habits. Subgroups of women and men with less healthy dietary patterns in the time window 2008–2016 with lower education, lower age, higher body mass index, lower levels of physical activity and more smoking were identified and future interventions may be targeted towards these groups.

  • 17. Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    Haller, Michael
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Jonsson, Martin
    Khut, George
    Loke, Lian
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Marti, Patrizia
    Melcer, Edward
    Müller, Florian Floyd
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Segura, Elena Márquez
    Ståhl, Anna
    Svanæs, Dag
    Tholander, Jakob
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018In: INFORMATICS-BASEL, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective—where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 18. Idavain, J.
    et al.
    Julge, K.
    Rebane, T.
    Lang, A.
    Orru, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. University of Tartu, Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Respiratory symptoms, asthma and levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in schoolchildren in the industrial areas of Estonia2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 650, no Pt 1, p. 65-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to air pollutants in the ambient environment has been associated with various respiratory symptoms, and with increased asthma diagnosis, in both children and adults. Most research to date has focussed on core pollutants, such as PM10, PM2.5, SO2 and NO2, and less attention has been given to the effects of industry-specific contamination. The current study aimed to examine the associations between respiratory symptoms, asthma, increased levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) (as a marker of eosinophilic airway inflammation) and ambient levels of industrial pollutants (such as benzene, phenol, formaldehyde and non-methane hydrocarbons) for schoolchildren living near oil shale industries in Ida-Viru County, Estonia.

    METHODS: A total of 1326 schoolchildren from Ida-Viru, Lääne-Viru and Tartu Counties participated in a cross-sectional study, consisting of questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and asthma, as well as clinical examinations to measure FeNO. Dispersion modelling was used to characterize individual-level exposure to industrial air pollutants at each subject's home address. Associations between exposure and respiratory health were investigated using logistic regression analysis, and differences in results between regions were analysed using the Chi-squared test.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms (p < 0.05) in children living near (i.e. within 5 km) of an oil shale industry site in Ida-Viru County was 2-4 times higher than in children living in the reference area of Tartu County. Children exposed to 1 μg/m3 higher levels of benzene and formaldehyde had a higher odds ratio (OR) of having rhinitis without a cold (OR 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.06), of ever having had attacks of asthma (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10) and of having a dry cough a few days per year (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10). Children exposed to 1 μg/m3 higher levels of benzene, formaldehyde, phenol and non-methane hydrocarbons had a higher odds ratio of having high FeNO levels (≥30 ppb): OR and 95% CI of 1.05, 1.01-1.09; 1.22, 1.06-1.41; 1.01, 1.00-1.01; and 1.75, 1.75-2.62, respectively.

  • 19.
    Jackson, Jennie A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Burdorf, Alex
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands..
    Punnett, Laura
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts, USA..
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Wahlström, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Occupational biomechanical risk factors for radial nerve entrapment in a 13-year prospective study among male construction workers2019In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 326-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to assess the association between occupational biomechanical exposure and the occurrence of radial nerve entrapment (RNE) in construction workers over a 13-year follow-up period.

    METHODS: A cohort of 229 707 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance programme (1971-1993) was examined prospectively (2001-2013) for RNE. Height, weight, age, smoking status and job title (construction trade) were obtained on health examination. RNE case status was defined by surgical release of RNE, with data from the Swedish national registry for out-patient surgery records. A job exposure matrix was developed, and biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned according to job title. Highly correlated exposures were summed into biomechanical exposure scores. Negative binomial models were used to estimate the relative risks (RR) (incidence rate ratios) of RNE surgical release for the biomechanical factors and exposure sum scores. Predicted incidence was assessed for each exposure score modelled as a continuous variable to assess exposure-response relationships.

    RESULTS: The total incidence rate of surgically treated RNE over the 13-year observation period was 3.53 cases per 100 000 person-years. There were 92 cases with occupational information. Increased risk for RNE was seen in workers with elevated hand-grip forces (RR=1.79, 95% CI 0.97 to 3.28) and exposure to hand-arm vibration (RR=1.47, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.00).

    CONCLUSIONS: Occupational exposure to forceful handgrip work and vibration increased the risk for surgical treatment of RNE.

  • 20.
    Jackson, Jennie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Liv, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Wahlström, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Occupational risk factors for hospitalization due to cervical disc disorder in a 29-year prospective study of Swedish male construction workers2019In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices, 2019, p. 168-168Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the associations between individual and occupational exposure factors and hospitalization for cervical disc disorder (CDD).

    Methods: CDD was examined prospectively in a cohort of 278 319 Swedish male construction workers who participated in a national health surveillance program (1971-1993). Job title, smoking status, age, height, and weight were recorded on examination. Case data were obtained through linkage with the Swedish national in-patient hospital registry for the period 1987 – 2016; case status was defined by primary diagnosis code M50.0 (ICD-10) or 722.0, 722.4, or 722.7 (ICD-9). A job exposure matrix was developed and occupational exposure estimates were assigned by job title. Self-reported estimates of pain/discomfort from a subset of 87 500 workers were also linked to the database. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the relative risks (RR) for the biomechanical and self-reported factors with adjustment for smoking status, age, BMI and surgical time period.

    Results: There were 562 cases of hospitalization for CDD; the incidence rate was 8.0 cases per 100 000 during the 29-year follow-up period. Smoking status, age, BMI and height were all associated with increased risk (RR 1.21-3.16). Occupational exposure to static work in non-neutral or extreme neck postures, and time spent in awkward postures showed the highest associations with CDD hospitalization (RR = 1.62 – 2.10). Upper arm load and time with arms above shoulders were also associated with increased risk (RR = 1.50 – 1.58). Workers who reported experiencing pain ‘often’ or ‘very often’ during the previous year for any of the neck, shoulder or upper back regions had a 3-fold increase in risk relative to workers reporting no pain.

    Conclusions: Occupational non-neutral neck posture was associated with increased risk of hospitalization for CDD. Our data also suggest an exposure-response relationship for self-reported neck pain/discomfort and risk of hospitalization for CDD.

  • 21.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Jarocka, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Predicting incident falls: Relationship between postural sway and limits of stability in older adults2019In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 66, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We have previously shown that objective measurements of postural sway predicts fall risk, although it is currently unknown how limits of stability (LOS) might influence these results.

    Research question: How integrated postural sway and LOS measurements predict the risk of incident falls in a population-based sample of older adults.

    Methods: The sample for this prospective observational study was drawn from the Healthy Ageing Initiative cohort and included data collected between June 2012 and December 2016 for 2396 men and women, all 70 years of age. LOS was compared to postural sway with measurements during eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) trials, using the previously validated Wii Force Plate. Fall history was assessed during baseline examination and incident falls were collected during follow-up at 6 and 12 months. Independent predictors of incident falls and additional covariates were investigated using multiple logistic regression models.

    Results: During follow-up, 337 out of 2396 participants (14%) had experienced a fall. Unadjusted regression models from the EO trial revealed increased fall risk by 6% (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.11) per each centimeter squared increase in sway area and by 16% (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07–1.25) per 1-unit increase in Sway-Area-to-LOS ratio. Odds ratios were generally lower when analyzing EC trials and only slightly attenuated in fully adjusted models.

    Significance: Integrating postural sway and LOS parameters provides valid fall risk prediction and a holistic analysis of postural stability. Future work should establish normative values and evaluate clinical utility of these measures.

  • 22.
    Jonsson, E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Silica dust and sarcoidosis in Swedish construction workers2019In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, article id kqz118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aetiology of sarcoidosis is not well established. In previous studies, smoking has been negatively associated with sarcoidosis and there are some indications of an association between exposure to silica dust and sarcoidosis.

    AIMS: To study the risk of sarcoidosis in relation to silica dust exposure.

    METHODS: A longitudinal cohort of construction workers linked with a registry of Swedish inpatient diagnoses. Workers were designated as exposed or unexposed to silica based on job titles in a job-exposure matrix. The relative risk (RR) was analysed with Poisson regression adjusting for age and smoking.

    RESULTS: We identified 371 cases of sarcoidosis among 297 917 male workers. There was an increased risk of sarcoidosis in the medium- to high-exposure group [RR 1.83 (95% confidence interval {CI} 1.14-2.95)]. A stratified analysis according to smoking showed that ever-smoking workers had an increased risk of sarcoidosis if highly exposed to silica dust [RR 2.44 (95% CI 1.37-4.33)] compared to non-exposed ever-smokers. The risk of non-smokers highly exposed to silica was not significantly increased [RR 1.07 (95% CI 0.72-1.58)] compared to non-exposed non-smokers.

    CONCLUSION: The study indicates an increased risk of developing sarcoidosis in ever-smoking men exposed to silica.

  • 23.
    Järvholm, Bengt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Umeå universitet.
    Mannelqvist, Ruth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Law.
    Ersättning vid arbetsskada2019In: Arbets- och miljömedicin: En lärobok om hälsa och miljö / [ed] Christer Edling, Gunnar Nordberg, Maria Albin, Monica Nordberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 4, p. 397-402Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Kriit, Hedi Katre
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Health economic assessment of a scenario to promote bicycling as active transport in Stockholm, Sweden2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e030466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To conduct a health economic evaluation of a proposed investment in urban bicycle infrastructure in Stockholm County, Sweden.

    DESIGN: A cost-effectiveness analysis is undertaken from a healthcare perspective. Investment costs over a 50-year life cycle are offset by averted healthcare costs and compared with estimated long-term impacts on morbidity, quantified in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The results are re-calculated under different assumptions to model the effects of uncertainty.

    SETTING: The Municipality of Stockholm (population 2.27 million) committed funds for bicycle path infrastructure with the aim of achieving a 15% increase in the number of bicycle commuters by 2030. This work is based on a previously constructed scenario, in which individual registry data on home and work address and a transport model allocation to different modes of transport identified 111 487 individuals with the physical capacity to bicycle to work within 30 min but that currently drive a car to work.

    RESULTS: Morbidity impacts and healthcare costs attributed to increased physical activity, change in air pollution exposure and accident risk are quantified under the scenario. The largest reduction in healthcare costs is attributed to increased physical activity and the second largest to reduced air pollution exposure among the population of Greater Stockholm. The expected net benefit from the investment is 8.7% of the 2017 Stockholm County healthcare budget, and 3.7% after discounting. The economic evaluation estimates that the intervention is cost-effective and each DALY averted gives a surplus of €9933. The results remained robust under varied assumptions pertaining to reduced numbers of additional bicycle commuters.

    CONCLUSION: Investing in urban infrastructure to increase bicycling as active transport is cost-effective from a healthcare sector perspective.

  • 25. Lee, Jae Young
    et al.
    Kim, Ho
    Gasparrini, Antonio
    Armstrong, Ben
    Bell, Michelle L
    Sera, Francesco
    Lavigne, Eric
    Abrutzky, Rosana
    Tong, Shilu
    Coelho, Micheline de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio
    Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento
    Correa, Patricia Matus
    Ortega, Nicolas Valdes
    Kan, Haidong
    Garcia, Samuel Osorio
    Kyselý, Jan
    Urban, Aleš
    Orru, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Indermitte, Ene
    Jaakkola, Jouni J K
    Ryti, Niilo R I
    Pascal, Mathilde
    Goodman, Patrick G
    Zeka, Ariana
    Michelozzi, Paola
    Scortichini, Matteo
    Hashizume, Masahiro
    Honda, Yasushi
    Hurtado, Magali
    Cruz, Julio
    Seposo, Xerxes
    Nunes, Baltazar
    Teixeira, João Paulo
    Tobias, Aurelio
    Íñiguez, Carmen
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Vicedo-Cabrera, Ana Maria
    Ragettli, Martina S
    Guo, Yue-Liang Leon
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    Zanobetti, Antonella
    Schwartz, Joel
    Dang, Tran Ngoc
    Do Van, Dung
    Mayvaneh, Fetemeh
    Overcenco, Ala
    Li, Shanshan
    Guo, Yuming
    Predicted temperature-increase-induced global health burden and its regional variability2019In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 131, article id 105027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increase in the global health burden of temperature was projected for 459 locations in 28 countries worldwide under four representative concentration pathway scenarios until 2099. We determined that the amount of temperature increase for each 100 ppm increase in global CO2 concentrations is nearly constant, regardless of climate scenarios. The overall average temperature increase during 2010-2099 is largest in Canada (1.16 °C/100 ppm) and Finland (1.14 °C/100 ppm), while it is smallest in Ireland (0.62 °C/100 ppm) and Argentina (0.63 °C/100 ppm). In addition, for each 1 °C temperature increase, the amount of excess mortality is increased largely in tropical countries such as Vietnam (10.34%p/°C) and the Philippines (8.18%p/°C), while it is decreased in Ireland (-0.92%p/°C) and Australia (-0.32%p/°C). To understand the regional variability in temperature increase and mortality, we performed a regression-based modeling. We observed that the projected temperature increase is highly correlated with daily temperature range at the location and vulnerability to temperature increase is affected by health expenditure, and proportions of obese and elderly population.

  • 26.
    Lewis, Charlotte A.
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jackson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Liv, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Wahlström, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgical treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in a 16-year prospective study among male construction workers2019In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices, 2019, p. 165-165Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Shoulder disorders are common in the general population, with an annual prevalence up to over 40% per 1000 person-years. One common disorder is subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), where a narrowing in the subacromial space causes compression of the tendons or bursa by the surrounding tissues. When conservative treatments are not effective, surgical treatments is often the alternative. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between occupational biomechanical exposures and the occurrence of surgically treated SIS in a large construction worker cohort over a 16-year follow-up period. 

    Methods: A cohort of 280 747 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance program (1971-1993) were examined prospectively (1987-2016) for SIS. SIS case status was defined by primary surgical treatment of diagnosis codes M75.1, M75.4, 726B, or 726C (ICD 10 and Swedish ICD 9 code systems), with data from the Swedish national registry for in- and out-patient surgery records. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was developed and biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned according to job title. Poisson regression models adjusted for age, BMI, smoking and a surgical time factor were used to estimate the relative risks (incidence rate ratios) of surgical treatment for SIS for each biomechanical factor.

    Results: There were 1381 cases in the cohort, which corresponded to an incidence rate of surgically treated SIS over the 16-year observation period of 46 cases per 100,000 person years. Increased risk for surgically treated SIS was shown for working with elevated arms (RR=1.27, 95% CI=1.02-1.58), heavy upper arm loads (RR=1.75, 95% CI=1.48-2.08), high grip force (RR=1.64, 95% CI=1.40-1.93), working with hand tools (RR=1.46, 95% CI=1.26-1.70), working with hand tools in a fixed posture (RR=1.28, 95% CI=1.14-1.44), and working with hand-arm vibration (RR=1.30, 95% CI=1.09-1.55).

    Conclusions: Working with elevated arms, high arm load, high grip force and vibrating handheld tools may increase the risk for SIS.

  • 27. Lillepold, Kate
    et al.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sewe, Maquins
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Semenza, Jan C.
    More arboviral disease outbreaks in continental Europe due to the warming climate?2019In: Journal of Travel Medicine, ISSN 1195-1982, E-ISSN 1708-8305Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Liu, Cong
    et al.
    Chen, Renjie
    Sera, Francesco
    Vicedo-Cabrera, Ana M
    Guo, Yuming
    Tong, Shilu
    Coelho, Micheline S Z S
    Saldiva, Paulo H N
    Lavigne, Eric
    Matus, Patricia
    Valdes Ortega, Nicolas
    Osorio Garcia, Samuel
    Pascal, Mathilde
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Scortichini, Matteo
    Hashizume, Masahiro
    Honda, Yasushi
    Hurtado-Díaz, Magali
    Cruz, Julio
    Nunes, Baltazar
    Teixeira, João P
    Kim, Ho
    Tobias, Aurelio
    Íñiguez, Carmen
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Ragettli, Martina S
    Guo, Yue-Leon
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    Bell, Michelle L
    Wright, Caradee Y
    Scovronick, Noah
    Garland, Rebecca M
    Milojevic, Ai
    Kyselý, Jan
    Urban, Aleš
    Orru, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. The Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Indermitte, Ene
    Jaakkola, Jouni J K
    Ryti, Niilo R I
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Analitis, Antonis
    Zanobetti, Antonella
    Schwartz, Joel
    Chen, Jianmin
    Wu, Tangchun
    Cohen, Aaron
    Gasparrini, Antonio
    Kan, Haidong
    Ambient Particulate Air Pollution and Daily Mortality in 652 Cities2019In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 381, no 8, p. 705-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The systematic evaluation of the results of time-series studies of air pollution is challenged by differences in model specification and publication bias.

    METHODS: We evaluated the associations of inhalable particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10) and fine PM with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5) with daily all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality across multiple countries or regions. Daily data on mortality and air pollution were collected from 652 cities in 24 countries or regions. We used overdispersed generalized additive models with random-effects meta-analysis to investigate the associations. Two-pollutant models were fitted to test the robustness of the associations. Concentration-response curves from each city were pooled to allow global estimates to be derived.

    RESULTS: On average, an increase of 10 μg per cubic meter in the 2-day moving average of PM10 concentration, which represents the average over the current and previous day, was associated with increases of 0.44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.50) in daily all-cause mortality, 0.36% (95% CI, 0.30 to 0.43) in daily cardiovascular mortality, and 0.47% (95% CI, 0.35 to 0.58) in daily respiratory mortality. The corresponding increases in daily mortality for the same change in PM2.5 concentration were 0.68% (95% CI, 0.59 to 0.77), 0.55% (95% CI, 0.45 to 0.66), and 0.74% (95% CI, 0.53 to 0.95). These associations remained significant after adjustment for gaseous pollutants. Associations were stronger in locations with lower annual mean PM concentrations and higher annual mean temperatures. The pooled concentration-response curves showed a consistent increase in daily mortality with increasing PM concentration, with steeper slopes at lower PM concentrations.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data show independent associations between short-term exposure to PM10 and PM2.5 and daily all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality in more than 600 cities across the globe. These data reinforce the evidence of a link between mortality and PM concentration established in regional and local studies. (Funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and others.).

  • 29.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Brännström, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. Evolution and Ecology Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Sewe, Maquins
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Estimating past, present and future trends in the global distribution and abundance of the arbovirus vector Aedes aegypti2019In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 7, article id 148Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aedes aegypti is the principal vector for several important arbovirus diseases, including dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, and Zika. While recent empirical research has attempted to identify the current global distribution of the vector, the seasonal, and longer-term dynamics of the mosquito in response to trends in climate, population, and economic development over the twentieth and the twenty-first century remains to be elucidated.

    Methods: In this study, we use a process-based mathematical model to estimate global vector distribution and abundance. The model is based on the lifecycle of the vector and its dependence on climate, and the model sensitivity to socio-economic development is tested. Model parameters were generally empirically based, and the model was calibrated to global databases and time series of occurrence and abundance records. Climate data on temperature and rainfall were taken from CRU TS3.25 (1901–2015) and five global circulation models (CMIP5; 2006–2099) forced by a high-end (RCP8.5) and a low-end (RCP2.6) emission scenario. Socio-economic data on global GDP and human population density were from ISIMIP (1950–2099).

    Findings: The change in the potential of global abundance in A. aegypti over the last century up to today is estimated to be an increase of 9.5% globally and a further increase of 20 or 30% by the end of this century under a low compared to a high carbon emission future, respectively. The largest increase has occurred in the last two decades, indicating a tipping point in climate-driven global abundance which will be stabilized at the earliest in the mid-twenty-first century. The realized abundance is estimated to be sensitive to socioeconomic development.

    Interpretation: Our data indicate that climate change mitigation, i.e., following the Paris Agreement, could considerably help in suppressing risks of increased abundance and emergence of A. aegypti globally in the second half of the twenty-first century.

  • 30.
    Liu-Helmersson, Jing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Heidelberg University Medical School, Institute of Public Health, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Sewe, Maquins
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Brännström, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. Evolution and Ecology Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Climate change may enable Aedes aegypti infestation in major European cities by 21002019In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 172, p. 693-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Climate change allows Aedes aegyptito infest new areas. Consequently, it enables the arboviruses the mosquito transmits - e.g., dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever – to emerge in previously uninfected areas. An example is the Portuguese island of Madeira during 2012–13.

    Objective: We aim to understand how climate change will affect the future spread of this potent vector, as an aidin assessing the risk of disease outbreaks and effectively allocating resources for vector control.

    Methods: We used an empirically-informed, process-based mathematical model to study the feasibility of Aedes aegypti infestation into continental Europe. Based on established global climate-change scenario data, we assess the potential of Aedes aegypti to establish in Europe over the 21st century by estimating the vector population growth rate for five climate models (GCM5).

    Results: In a low carbon emission future (RCP2.6), we find minimal change to the current situation throughout the whole of the 21st century. In a high carbon future (RCP8.5), a large parts of southern Europe risks being invaded by Aedes aegypti.

    Conclusion: Our results show that successfully enforcing the Paris Agreement by limiting global warming to below 2 °C significantly lowers the risk for infestation of Aedes aegypti and consequently of potential large-scale arboviral disease outbreaks in Europe within the 21st century.

  • 31.
    Liyanage, Prasad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Ministry of Health, Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Tissera, Hasitha
    Palihawadana, Paba
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Tozan, Yesim
    Evaluation of intensified dengue control measures with interrupted time series analysis in the Panadura Medical Officer of Health division in Sri Lanka: a case study and cost-effectiveness analysis2019In: The Lancet Planetary Health, ISSN 2542-5196, Vol. 3, no 5, p. e211-e218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dengue has become a major public health problem in Sri Lanka with a considerable economic burden. As a response, in June, 2014, the Ministry of Health initiated a proactive vector control programme in partnership with military and police forces, known as the Civil-Military Cooperation (CIMIC) programme, that was targeted at high-risk Medical Officer of Health (MOH) divisions in the country. Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of population-level interventions is essential to guide public health planning and resource allocation decisions, particularly in resource-limited health-care settings.

    Methods: Using an interrupted time series design with a non-linear extension, we evaluated the impact of vector control interventions from June 22, 2014, to Dec 29, 2016, in Panadura, a high-risk MOH division in Western Province, Sri Lanka. We used dengue notification and larval survey data to estimate the reduction in Breteau index and dengue incidence before and after the intervention using two separate models, adjusting for time-varying confounding variables (ie, rainfall, temperature, and the Oceanic Niño Index). We also assessed the cost and cost-effectiveness of the CIMIC programme from the perspective of the National Dengue Control Unit under the scenarios of different levels of hospitalisation of dengue cases (low [25%], medium [50%], and high [75%]) in terms of cost per disability-adjusted life-year averted (DALY).

    Findings: Vector control interventions had a significant impact on combined Breteau index (relative risk reduction 0·43, 95% CI 0·26 to 0·70) and on dengue incidence (0·43, 0·28 to 0·67), the latter becoming prominent 2 months after the intervention onset. The mean number of averted dengue cases was estimated at 2192 (95% CI 1741 to 2643), and the total cost of the CIMIC programme at 2016 US$271 615. Personnel costs accounted for about 89% of the total cost. In the base-case scenario of moderate level of hospitalisation, the CIMIC programme was cost-saving with a probability of 70% under both the lowest ($453) and highest ($1686) cost-effectiveness thresholds, resulting in a net saving of $20 247 (95% CI −57 266 to 97 790) and averting 176 DALYs (133 to 226), leading to a cost of −$98 (−497 to 395) per DALY averted. This was also the case for the scenario with high hospitalisation levels (cost per DALY averted −$512, 95% CI −872 to −115) but with a higher probability of 99%. In the scenario with low hospitalisation levels (cost per DALY averted $690, 143 to 1379), although the CIMIC programme was cost-ineffective at the lowest threshold with a probability of 77%, it was cost-effective at the highest threshold with a probability of 99%.

    Interpretation: This study suggests that communities affected by dengue can benefit from investments in vector control if interventions are implemented rigorously and coordinated well across sectors. By doing so, it is possible to reduce the disease and economic burden of dengue in endemic settings.

    Funding: None.

  • 32.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sports Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway..
    Use of short-acting and long-acting hypnotics and the risk of fracture: a critical analysis of associations in a nationwide cohort2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Numerous observational studies suggest that hypnotics increase the risk of fractures, and long-acting hypnotics are suggested to be especially harmful. This study showed that the highest risk of fracture was found before start of treatment and remained after end of therapy, suggesting that the increased risk during treatment is influenced by other factors, such as underlying disease.

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between the use of short-acting and long-acting hypnotics and the risk of fracture.

    Methods: Four cohorts were formed from all individuals living in Sweden aged ≥ 50 years in 2005 (n = 3,341,706). In the first cohort, individuals prescribed long-acting propiomazine (n = 233,609) were matched 1:1 with controls. In the second cohort, individuals prescribed short-acting z-drugs (zopiclone, zolpidem, and zaleplon, n = 591,136) were matched 1:1 with controls. The third and fourth cohorts consisted of full sibling pairs with discordant propiomazine (n = 83,594) and z-drug (n = 153,314) use, respectively.

    Results: The risk of fracture was greatest among users of hypnotics in the 90 days before the initiation of treatment, both for propiomazine (odds ratio [OR], 2.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.28–2.79) and z-drugs (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 3.86–4.35) compared with that in matched controls. Furthermore, this risk was significantly reduced after the initiation of treatment with propiomazine (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.27–1.60) and z-drugs (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.56–1.80) and remained the first year following the last prescribed dose both for propiomazine (OR, 1.28, 95% CI, 1.21–1.36) and z-drugs (OR, 1.19, 95% CI, 1.16–1.23). The pattern was similar in the sibling cohorts, with the greatest risk of fracture seen in the 90 days before treatment with hypnotics was initiated.

    Conclusion: The use of short-acting and long-acting hypnotics is associated with an increased risk of fracture. This risk was highest before initiation of treatment and remained after end of therapy. The results suggest that the increased risk during treatment is influenced by other factors such as underlying disease.

  • 33.
    Olstrup, Henrik
    et al.
    Atmospheric Science Unit, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Christer
    Atmospheric Science Unit, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 11418 Stockholm, Sweden. Environment and Health Administration, SLB, Box 8136, 104 20 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Association between Mortality and Short-Term Exposure to Particles, Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide in Stockholm, Sweden2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 6, article id E1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the effects on daily mortality in Stockholm associated with short-term exposure to ultrafine particles (measured as number of particles with a diameter larger than 4 nm, PNC₄), black carbon (BC) and coarse particles (PM2.5⁻10) have been compared with the effects from more common traffic-pollution indicators (PM10, PM2.5 and NO₂) and O₃ during the period 2000⁻2016. Air pollution exposure was estimated from measurements at a 20 m high building in central Stockholm. The associations between daily mortality lagged up to two days (lag 02) and the different air pollutants were modelled by using Poisson regression. The pollutants with the strongest indications of an independent effect on daily mortality were O₃, PM2.5⁻10 and PM10. In the single-pollutant model, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in O₃ was associated with an increase in daily mortality of 2.0% (95% CI: 1.1⁻3.0) for lag 01 and 1.9% (95% CI: 1.0⁻2.9) for lag 02. An IQR increase in PM2.5⁻10 was associated with an increase in daily mortality of 0.8% (95% CI: 0.1⁻1.5) for lag 01 and 1.1% (95% CI: 0.4⁻1.8) for lag 02. PM10 was associated with a significant increase only at lag 02, with 0.8% (95% CI: 0.08⁻1.4) increase in daily mortality associated with an IQR increase in the concentration. NO₂ exhibits negative associations with mortality. The significant excess risk associated with O₃ remained significant in two-pollutant models after adjustments for PM2.5⁻10, BC and NO₂. The significant excess risk associated with PM2.5⁻10 remained significant in a two-pollutant model after adjustment for NO₂. The significantly negative associations for NO₂ remained significant in two-pollutant models after adjustments for PM2.5⁻10, O₃ and BC. A potential reason for these findings, where statistically significant excess risks were found for O₃, PM2.5⁻10 and PM10, but not for NO₂, PM2.5, PNC₄ and BC, is behavioral factors that lead to misclassification in the exposure. The concentrations of O₃ and PM2.5⁻10 are in general highest during sunny and dry days during the spring, when exposure to outdoor air tend to increase, while the opposite applies to NO₂, PNC₄ and BC, with the highest concentrations during the short winter days with cold weather, when people are less exposed to outdoor air.

  • 34.
    Otten, Julia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Ryberg, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Mellberg, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Andersson, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Chorell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Larsson, Christel
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, Goteborgs Universitet, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Holst, Jens Juul
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Postprandial levels of GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon after two years of weight loss with a Paleolithic diet: a randomized controlled trial in healthy obese women2019In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 180, no 6, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how weight loss by different diets impacts on postprandial levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon.

    METHODS: In this single-centre, parallel group 2-year trial, 70 healthy postmenopausal obese women were randomized to the Paleolithic diet or a healthy control diet based on Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. Both diets were without calorie restriction. The primary outcome was the change in fat mass. Here, secondary analyses on GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon measured during an OGTT are described.

    RESULTS: In the Paleolithic diet group, mean weight loss compared to baseline was 11% at 6 months, and 10% at 24 months. In the control diet group, mean weight loss was 6% after 6 and 24 months (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.049 for the comparison between groups at 6 and 24 months respectively). Compared to baseline, the mean incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for GLP-1 increased by 34% and 45% after 6 and 24 months in the Paleolithic diet group, and increased by 59% after 24 months in the control diet group. The mean iAUC for GIP increased only in the Paleolithic diet group. The AUC for glucagon increased during the first 6 months in both groups. The fasting glucagon increase correlated with the β-hydroxybutyrate increase.

    CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss caused an increase in postprandial GLP-1 levels and a further rise occurred during weight maintenance. Postprandial GIP levels increased only after the Paleolithic diet. Reduced postprandial glucagon suppression may be caused by a catabolic state.

  • 35.
    Oudin, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden..
    Andersson, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin Adolfsson, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Oudin Åström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Traffic-Related Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Dementia: No Clear Modifying Effects of APOEɛ4 in the Betula Cohort2019In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely known that the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele imposes a higher risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that exposure to air pollution is also a risk factor for AD, and results from a few studies indicate that the effect of air pollution on cognitive function and dementia is stronger in APOE ɛ4 carriers than in non-carriers. Air pollution and interaction with APOE ɛ4 on AD risk thus merits further attention. We studied dementia incidence over a 15-year period from the longitudinal Betula study in Northern Sweden. As a marker for long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution, we used modelled annual mean nitrogen oxide levels at the residential address of the participants at start of follow-up. Nitrogen oxide correlate well with fine particulate air pollution levels in the study area. We had full data on air pollution, incidence of AD and vascular dementia (VaD), APOE ɛ4 carrier status, and relevant confounding factors for 1,567 participants. As expected, air pollution was rather clearly associated with dementia incidence. However, there was no evidence for a modifying effect by APOE ɛ4 on the association (p-value for interaction > 0.30 for both total dementia (AD+VaD) and AD). The results from this study do not imply that adverse effects of air pollution on dementia incidence is limited to, or stronger in, APOE ɛ4 carriers than in the total population.

  • 36.
    Oudin Åström, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Veber, Triin
    Martinsone, Žanna
    Kaļužnaja, Darja
    Indermitte, Ene
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Orru, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Mortality Related to Cold Temperatures in Two Capitals of the Baltics: Tallinn and Riga2019In: Medicina (Kaunas), ISSN 1010-660X, E-ISSN 1648-9144, Vol. 55, no 8, article id 429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Despite global warming, the climate in Northern Europe is generally cold, and the large number of deaths due to non-optimal temperatures is likely due to cold temperatures. The aim of the current study is to investigate the association between cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, as well as cause-specific mortality, in Tallinn and Riga in North-Eastern Europe.

    Materials and Methods: We used daily information on deaths from state death registries and minimum temperatures from November to March over the period 1997-2015 in Tallinn and 2009-2015 in Riga. The relationship between the daily minimum temperature and mortality was investigated using the Poisson regression, combined with a distributed lag non-linear model considering lag times of up to 21 days.

    Results: We found significantly higher all-cause mortality owing to cold temperatures both in Tallinn (Relative Risk (RR) = 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.62) and in Riga (RR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.79). In addition, significantly increased mortality due to cold temperatures was observed in the 75+ age group (RR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.17-2.31) and in cardiovascular mortality (RR = 1.83, 95% CI 1.31-2.55) in Tallinn and in the under 75 age group in Riga (RR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.12-2.22). In this study, we found no statistically significant relationship between mortality due to respiratory or external causes and cold days. The cold-related attributable fraction (AF) was 7.4% (95% CI -3.7-17.5) in Tallinn and 8.3% (95% CI -0.5-16.3) in Riga. This indicates that a relatively large proportion of deaths in cold periods can be related to cold in North-Eastern Europe, where winters are relatively harsh.

  • 37.
    Ramadona, Aditya Lia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Center for Environmental Studies, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
    Tozan, Yesim
    Lazuardi, Lutfan
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    A combination of incidence data and mobility proxies from social media predicts the intra-urban spread of dengue in Yogyakarta, Indonesia2019In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, E-ISSN 1935-2735, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0007298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Only a few studies have investigated the potential of using geotagged social media data for predicting the patterns of spatio-temporal spread of vector-borne diseases. We herein demonstrated the role of human mobility in the intra-urban spread of dengue by weighting local incidence data with geo-tagged Twitter data as a proxy for human mobility across 45 neighborhoods in Yogyakarta city, Indonesia. To estimate the dengue virus importation pressure in each study neighborhood monthly, we developed an algorithm to estimate a dynamic mobility-weighted incidence index (MI), which quantifies the level of exposure to virus importation in any given neighborhood. Using a Bayesian spatio-temporal regression model, we estimated the coefficients and predictiveness of the MI index for lags up to 6 months. Specifically, we used a Poisson regression model with an unstructured spatial covariance matrix. We compared the predictability of the MI index to that of the dengue incidence rate over the preceding months in the same neighborhood (autocorrelation) and that of the mobility information alone. We based our estimates on a volume of 1·302·405 geotagged tweets (from 118·114 unique users) and monthly dengue incidence data for the 45 study neighborhoods in Yogyakarta city over the period from August 2016 to June 2018. The MI index, as a standalone variable, had the highest explanatory power for predicting dengue transmission risk in the study neighborhoods, with the greatest predictive ability at a 3-months lead time. The MI index was a better predictor of the dengue risk in a neighborhood than the recent transmission patterns in the same neighborhood, or just the mobility patterns between neighborhoods. Our results suggest that human mobility is an important driver of the spread of dengue within cities when combined with information on local circulation of the dengue virus. The geotagged Twitter data can provide important information on human mobility patterns to improve our understanding of the direction and the risk of spread of diseases, such as dengue. The proposed MI index together with traditional data sources can provide useful information for the development of more accurate and efficient early warning and response systems.

  • 38.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ebi, K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Contrast in mortality related to temperature and persistent temperature extremes: a study of cause-specific and age stratified mortalityIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Tozan, Yesim
    Ramadona, Aditya Lia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sewe, Maquins Odhiambo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sudre, Bertrand
    Garrido, Jon
    de Saint Lary, Chiara Bellegarde
    Lohr, Wolfgang
    Semenza, Jan C.
    Using Big Data to Monitor the Introduction and Spread of Chikungunya, Europe, 20172019In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1041-1049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With regard to fully harvesting the potential of big data, public health lags behind other fields. To determine this potential, we applied big data (air passenger volume from international areas with active chikungunya transmission, Twitter data, and vectorial capacity estimates of Aedes albopictus mosquitoes) to the 2017 chikungunya outbreaks in Europe to assess the risks for virus transmission, virus importation, and short-range dispersion from the outbreak foci. We found that indicators based on voluminous and velocious data can help identify virus dispersion from outbreak foci and that vector abundance and vectorial capacity estimates can provide information on local climate suitability for mosquitoborne outbreaks. In contrast, more established indicators based on Wikipedia and Google Trends search strings were less timely. We found that a combination of novel and disparate datasets can be used in real time to prevent and control emerging and reemerging infectious diseases.

  • 40. Sagelv, Edvard H.
    et al.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Johansson, Jonas
    Welde, Boye
    Grimsgaard, Sameline
    Emaus, Nina
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Brage, Soren
    Horsch, Alexander
    Hopstock, Laila A.
    Morseth, Bente
    Measures Of Adiposity And Its Association To Physical Activity In Adults: The Tromso Study2019In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 447-447Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41. Santucci-Pereira, Julia
    et al.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Afanasyeva, Yelena
    Zhong, Hua
    Slifker, Michael
    Peri, Suraj
    Ross, Eric A
    López de Cicco, Ricardo
    Zhai, Yubo
    Nguyen, Theresa
    Sheriff, Fathima
    Russo, Irma H
    Su, Yanrong
    Arslan, Alan A
    Bordas, Pal
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Åhman, Janet
    Landström Eriksson, Anna Stina
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Russo, Jose
    Genomic signature of parity in the breast of premenopausal women2019In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Full-term pregnancy (FTP) at an early age confers long-term protection against breast cancer. Previously, we reported that a FTP imprints a specific gene expression profile in the breast of postmenopausal women. Herein, we evaluated gene expression changes induced by parity in the breast of premenopausal women.

    METHODS: Gene expression profiling of normal breast tissue from 30 nulliparous (NP) and 79 parous (P) premenopausal volunteers was performed using Affymetrix microarrays. In addition to a discovery/validation analysis, we conducted an analysis of gene expression differences in P vs. NP women as a function of time since last FTP. Finally, a laser capture microdissection substudy was performed to compare the gene expression profile in the whole breast biopsy with that in the epithelial and stromal tissues.

    RESULTS: Discovery/validation analysis identified 43 differentially expressed genes in P vs. NP breast. Analysis of expression as a function of time since FTP revealed 286 differentially expressed genes (238 up- and 48 downregulated) comparing all P vs. all NP, and/or P women whose last FTP was less than 5 years before biopsy vs. all NP women. The upregulated genes showed three expression patterns: (1) transient: genes upregulated after FTP but whose expression levels returned to NP levels. These genes were mainly related to immune response, specifically activation of T cells. (2) Long-term changing: genes upregulated following FTP, whose expression levels decreased with increasing time since FTP but did not return to NP levels. These were related to immune response and development. (3) Long-term constant: genes that remained upregulated in parous compared to nulliparous breast, independently of time since FTP. These were mainly involved in development/cell differentiation processes, and also chromatin remodeling. Lastly, we found that the gene expression in whole tissue was a weighted average of the expression in epithelial and stromal tissues.

    CONCLUSIONS: Genes transiently activated by FTP may have a role in protecting the mammary gland against neoplastically transformed cells through activation of T cells. Furthermore, chromatin remodeling and cell differentiation, represented by the genes that are maintained upregulated long after the FTP, may be responsible for the lasting preventive effect against breast cancer.

  • 42.
    Sawalha, Sami
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Krefting Research center , Institution of Medicine, University of Gothenburg.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Mortality by cause of death and spirometric pattern in a population based study: more than 10 years follow-up of the OLIN COPD studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Sawalha, Sami
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundback, Bo
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    The impact of comorbidities on mortality among men and women with COPD: report from the OLIN COPD study2019In: Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease, ISSN 1753-4658, Vol. 13, article id 1753466619860058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comorbidities probably contribute to the increased mortality observed among subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but sex differences in the prognostic impact of comorbidities have rarely been evaluated in population-based studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of common comorbidities, cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), and anxiety/depression (A/D), on mortality among men and women with and without airway obstruction in a population-based study.

    Methods: All subjects with airway obstruction [forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/(forced) vital capacity ((F)VC) <0.70, n = 993] were, together with age- and sex-matched referents, identified after examinations of population-based cohorts in 2002-2004.

    Spirometric groups: normal lung function (NLF) and COPD (post-bronchodilator FEV1/(F)VC <0.70) and additionally, LLN-COPD (FEV1/(F)VC <lower limit of normal). Mortality data was collected until December 2015. Results: In COPD, the prevalence of CVD and DM was higher in men, whereas the prevalence of A/D was higher in women. The cumulative mortality was significantly higher in COPD than NLF, and higher in men than women in both groups. Among women with COPD, CVD and A/D but not DM increased the risk of death independent of age, body mass index, smoking habits, and disease severity, whereas among men DM and A/D but not CVD increased the risk for death. When the LLN criterion was applied, the pattern was similar.

    Conclusion: There were sex-dependent differences regarding the impact of comorbidities on prognosis in COPD. Even though the prevalence of CVD was higher in men, the impact of CVD on mortality was higher in women, and despite higher prevalence of A/D in women, the impact on mortality was similar in both sexes. The reviews of this paper are available via the supplemental material section.

  • 44.
    Schyllert, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Social Determinants in Asthma: Population-based studies on asthma and respiratory symptoms in relation to occupation, occupational exposure and socioeconomic status2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic obstructive airway diseases among children and adults, with a prevalence between 6-11% in European countries. It is also the most common work-related occupational respiratory disease. There are different methods to classify occupational exposure and, even though there is no clear consensus on which method is the most accurate, the single-item question on exposure to the composite measure vapour, gas, dust or fumes (VGDF) is commonly used in epidemiological research. Low socioeconomic status is associated with asthma and also behavioural factors such as smoking and over-weight, which by themselves are risk factors for asthma. Socioeconomic status is, however, truly a multifaceted concept and using only one measure does not encompass its entire effect on health-related outcomes. Asthma does also have a negative impact on the quality of life among adolescents: they report less physical fitness compared to their peers and more school absenteeism due to respiratory symptoms. Still, research on whether childhood asthma has any impact on socioeconomic status in young adulthood is scarce.

    Aim: The overall aim is to study social determinants of health such as socioeconomic status, occupation and occupational exposure and their relationship with asthma and respiratory symptoms among adults and further, to evaluate if asthma during childhood or adolescence is associated with social determinants in young adulthood.

    Method: This thesis includes four papers based on data from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) studies. Papers I-III are cross-sectional studies among adults; a structured interview from clinical examinations between 2002-04 (paper I, n=4036) and postal questionnaire surveys from 2006 (paper II, n=9992) and 2016 (paper III, n=6854) with the addition of register-based data in paper III. Paper IV is a longitudinal prospective cohort study; the first OLIN paediatric cohort followed from 7 to 19 years of age and a postal questionnaire follow-up at ages 27-28 in 2015 (n=2017). Asthma was defined as physician diagnosis (paper I) together with respiratory symptoms (paper II-IV) or use of asthma medication (paper IV). In paper IV asthma was further categorized based on age of onset and p v and adolescence. Main or longest held occupation was used to categorize occupational and socioeconomic groups. In papers III and IV additional measures of socioeconomic status were included; educational level (papers III and IV) and income (paper III). In all papers, occupational exposure to vapour and/or gas, dust and fumes (VGDF or GDF) were taken into consideration and in paper I further divided into subgroups based on a detailed questionnaire on occupational exposure.

    Results: In paper I we found that the association between occupational exposure to VGDF and asthma and rhinitis was driven by the component of chemicals rather than dusts. In paper II, the ISCO-based manual Swedish Standard Classification of Occupations (SSYK) and the manual Socioeconomic classification (SEI), could both identify occupational and socioeconomic groups at risk for respiratory symptoms and asthma, while the older ISCO-based manual Nordic Classification of Occupations (NYK) was not as sensitive.

    In paper III, behavioural risk factors for respiratory symptoms and asthma such as smoking and obesity and, occupational exposure to GDF were associated with low educational level. Interaction analyses between income level and sex revealed different patterns among women and men. Among women, low income was associated with all respiratory symptoms as well as asthma, while among men only with productive cough.

    In paper IV, early onset asthma was associated with lower educational level in young adulthood, especially not continuing after compulsory school. Further, those with asthma during childhood or adolescence did not seem to refrain from smoking at age 19, nor did they as young adults seem to avoid occupations with known or expected exposure to GDF.

    Conclusions: Increased automation in industries have decreased the number of manual workers in industries with typically dirty tasks, meaning that the interrelationships between the subgroups included in VGDF may have changed. This may also affect the meaning of occupational exposure to VGDF, at least with regard to asthma and rhinitis, and according to our findings exposure to the component of chemicals may be the most important. We also found that the use of an ISCO-based manual (SSYK) as well as socioeconomic classification based on job-title (SEI) can be useful and easily applicable tools to identify occupational and socioeconomic groups at risk for respiratory symptoms and asthma. Further, low socioeconomic status is associated with respiratory vi symptoms and asthma. It seems as these associations relies more on low income than low educational level. Low educational level as well as low income are furthermore related to known behavioural risk factors for respiratory symptoms and asthma such as obesity, smoking and, also potentially modifiable risk factors as occupational exposure to gas dust or fumes. Having a persisting asthma since childhood is associated with lower educational level as a young adult. This may, in turn, be related with behavioural risk factors as discussed above and, there were no indications that those with child or adolescent asthma refrained from smoking at age 19. Neither did they in young adulthood avoid occupations with known or expected exposure to gas, dust or fumes, such as manufacturing, construction and transportation work. To conclude, our results indicate a vicious circle with regard to the relationship between the studied social determinants of health and asthma and respiratory symptoms.

  • 45.
    Schyllert, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Linnea, Hedman
    Caroline, Stridsman
    Pinja, Ilmarinen
    Päivi, Piirilä
    Krokstad, Steinar
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Rönmark, Eva
    Backman, Helena
    Low socioeconomic status is associated with asthma and respiratory symptoms in northern Sweden, especially among women: The OLIN and Nordic EpiLung studiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Schyllert, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Andersson, Martin
    Backman, Helena
    Lindberg, Anne
    Hedman, Linnea
    Childhood asthma affects educational level in young adults: a prospective cohort studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 47. Selberg, Stina
    et al.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå..
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå..
    Asthma control and acute health care visits among young adults with asthma: A population-based study2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To study asthma control and acute health care visits among young adults with asthma.

    BACKGROUND: Despite the access to effective treatment and nursing interventions, poor asthma control is still common among individuals with asthma. However, studies describing clinical characteristics among young adults with asthma are rare.

    DESIGN: A population-based cohort study.

    METHODS: In 2015, as a part of the OLIN pediatric cohort I (recruited in 1996 at age 7-8yr), N=2291 young adults (27-28 yr) completed a postal questionnaire survey including questions on asthma and respiratory symptoms. Of these, N=280 (12%) were identified as having current asthma and were further studied.

    RESULTS: Of those with current asthma, women reported respiratory symptoms and smoking to a greater extent than men. Approximately one-fourth had uncontrolled asthma and acute health care visits due to asthma was reported by 15% of women and 8% of men. Uncontrolled asthma was associated with smoking, lower educational level, use of reliever treatment most days and acute health care visits. Acute health care visits due to asthma were associated with periodic use of regular controller treatment also after adjustment for uncontrolled asthma.

    CONCLUSION: The result indicate poor adherence to asthma treatment which may lead to decreased asthma control and acute health care visits.

    IMPACT: Most young adults with asthma are diagnosed and treated in primary care, ideally in a team with a nurse. The main findings highlight the need for evidenced-based nursing interventions, contributing to a more efficient asthma management in primary care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 48. Sera, Francesco
    et al.
    Armstrong, Ben
    Tobias, Aurelio
    Vicedo-Cabrera, Ana Maria
    Åström, Christofer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Bell, Michelle L
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, Micheline
    Matus Correa, Patricia
    Cruz, Julio Cesar
    Dang, Tran Ngoc
    Hurtado-Diaz, Magali
    Do Van, Dung
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Guo, Yue Leon
    Guo, Yuming
    Hashizume, Masahiro
    Honda, Yasushi
    Iñiguez, Carmen
    Jaakkola, Jouni J K
    Kan, Haidong
    Kim, Ho
    Lavigne, Eric
    Michelozzi, Paola
    Ortega, Nicolas Valdes
    Osorio, Samuel
    Pascal, Mathilde
    Ragettli, Martina S
    Ryti, Niilo R I
    Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento
    Schwartz, Joel
    Scortichini, Matteo
    Seposo, Xerxes
    Tong, Shilu
    Zanobetti, Antonella
    Gasparrini, Antonio
    How urban characteristics affect vulnerability to heat and cold: a multi-country analysis2019In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, article id dyz008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The health burden associated with temperature is expected to increase due to a warming climate. Populations living in cities are likely to be particularly at risk, but the role of urban characteristics in modifying the direct effects of temperature on health is still unclear. In this contribution, we used a multi-country dataset to study effect modification of temperature-mortality relationships by a range of city-specific indicators.

    METHODS: We collected ambient temperature and mortality daily time-series data for 340 cities in 22 countries, in periods between 1985 and 2014. Standardized measures of demographic, socio-economic, infrastructural and environmental indicators were derived from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Regional and Metropolitan Database. We used distributed lag non-linear and multivariate meta-regression models to estimate fractions of mortality attributable to heat and cold (AF%) in each city, and to evaluate the effect modification of each indicator across cities.

    RESULTS: Heat- and cold-related deaths amounted to 0.54% (95% confidence interval: 0.49 to 0.58%) and 6.05% (5.59 to 6.36%) of total deaths, respectively. Several city indicators modify the effect of heat, with a higher mortality impact associated with increases in population density, fine particles (PM2.5), gross domestic product (GDP) and Gini index (a measure of income inequality), whereas higher levels of green spaces were linked with a decreased effect of heat.

    CONCLUSIONS: This represents the largest study to date assessing the effect modification of temperature-mortality relationships. Evidence from this study can inform public-health interventions and urban planning under various climate-change and urban-development scenarios.

  • 49.
    Shi, Lin
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Brunius, Carl
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Donat Vargas, Carolina
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kiviranta, Hannu
    Environmental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland..
    Hanhineva, Kati
    LC-MS Metabolomics Center, Kuopio, Finland. Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland..
    Åkesson, Agneta
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Landberg, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Joint Analysis of Metabolite Markers of Fish Intake and Persistent Organic Pollutants in Relation to Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Swedish Adults2019In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 149, no 8, p. 1413-1423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is conflicting evidence regarding the association between fish intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D) incidence, possibly owing to measurement errors in self-reported intake and coexposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) present in fish.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify plasma metabolites associated with fish intake and to assess their association with T2D risk, independently of POPs, in Swedish adults.

    METHODS: In a case-control study nested in the Swedish Västerbotten Intervention Programme, fasting plasma samples from 421 matched T2D case-control pairs of men and women aged 30-60 y at baseline and 10-y follow-up samples from a subset of 149 pairs were analyzed using untargeted metabolomics. Moreover, 16 plasma POPs were analyzed for the 149 pairs who had repeated samples available. Fish-related plasma metabolites were identified using multivariate modelling and partial correlation analysis. Reproducibility of metabolites and metabolite patterns, derived via principal component analysis (PCA), was assessed by intraclass correlation. A unique component of metabolites unrelated to POPs was dissected by integrating metabolites and POPs using 2-way orthogonal partial least squares regression. ORs of T2D were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

    RESULTS: We identified 31 metabolites associated with fish intake that had poor to good reproducibility. A PCA-derived metabolite pattern strongly correlated with fish intake (ρ = 0.37, P < 0.001) but showed no association with T2D risk. Integrating fish-related metabolites and POPs led to a unique metabolite component independent of POPs, which tended to be inversely associated with T2D risk (OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.54, 1.02, P = 0.07). This component mainly consisted of metabolites reflecting fatty fish intake.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that fatty fish intake may be beneficial for T2D prevention, after removing the counteractive effects of coexposure to POPs in Swedish adults. Integrating metabolite markers and POP exposures appears a promising approach to advance the understanding of associations between fish intake and T2D incidence.

  • 50.
    Shirdel, Mariam
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Andersson, Britt M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Wingfors, Håkan
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, CBRN Defence & Security Division, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Liljelind, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Passive personal air sampling of dust in a working environment: A pilot study2019In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, ISSN 1545-9624, E-ISSN 1545-9632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to make a preliminary evaluation of the University of North Carolina passive aerosol sampler (UNC sampler) for personal air sampling of particles. Nine personal air samplings of respirable fraction were conducted in an open-pit mine, with pairwise UNC samplers and a respirable cyclone mounted on the chest of workers. UNC samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to some extent energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Respirable cyclone filter samples were weighed. Correlations and particle elemental compositions were described. Microscopic imaging of the collection surface showed that the particles were heterogeneously deposited across the surface of the UNC sampler. Collected particles were shaped as gravel particles and the resulting particle size distribution in air showed a peak at ca. 3 µm aerodynamic diameter, similarly to what has previously been reported from the same mine. The elemental composition indicated mineral origin. All correlations between the airborne mass concentrations from UNC samplers and respirable cyclones (Pearson = 0.54 and Spearman = 0.43) and between pairs of parallel UNC samplers (Pearson = 0.55 and Spearman = 0.67) were weak. The UNC sampler mass concentrations were approximately 30 times higher than those measured with the respirable cyclone. In conclusion, the UNC sampler, when used for personal sampling in a mine, provides a reasonable particle size distribution and the deposited particles appeared to be of mineral origin and not from textile or skin but the approximately 30-fold overestimation of mass concentrations when comparing with respirable cyclone sampling indicates that further improvements are necessary. Positioning of the sampler may be critical and moving the UNC sampler from the chest to e.g. the top of a helmet might be an improvement. Grounding of the sampler in order to avoid static electricity might also be useful. The UNC sampler should continue to be researched for personal sampling, as passive sampling might become a useful alternative to more laborious sampling techniques.

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