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  • 1. Ali, Alisha
    et al.
    Carson, Dean
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Information and communications technology (ICT) and the challenge of sustainable self-drive tourism2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 124-145Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 2. Auer, K.
    et al.
    Carson, Dean
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    How can general practitioners establish 'place attachment' in Australia's Northern Territory?: Adjustment trumps adaptation2010Inngår i: Rural and remote health, ISSN 1445-6354, Vol. 10, nr 1476Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Retention of GPs in the more remote parts of Australia remains an important issue in workforce planning. The Northern Territory of Australia experiences very high rates of staff turnover. This research examined how the process of forming 'place attachment' between GP and practice location might influence prospects for retention. It examines whether GPs use 'adjustment' (short term trade-offs between work and lifestyle ambitions) or 'adaptation' (attempts to change themselves and their environment to fulfil lifestyle ambitions) strategies to cope with the move to new locations. Methods: 19 semi-structured interviews were conducted mostly with GPs who had been in the Northern Territory for less than 3 years. Participants were asked about the strategies they used in an attempt to establish place attachment. Strategies could be structural (work related), personal, social or environmental. Results: There were strong structural motivators for GPs to move to the Northern Territory. These factors were seen as sufficiently attractive to permit the setting aside of other lifestyle ambitions for a short period of time. Respondents found the environmental aspects of life in remote areas to be the most satisfying outside work. Social networks were temporary and the need to re-establish previous networks was the primary driver of out migration. Conclusion: GPs primarily use adjustment strategies to temporarily secure their position within their practice community. There were few examples of adaptation strategies that would facilitate a longer term match between the GPs' overall life ambitions and the characteristics of the community. While this suggests that lengths of stay will continue to be short, better adjustment skills might increase the potential for repeat service and limit the volume of unplanned early exits.

  • 3. Barakat, Bilal
    et al.
    Carson, Dean
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Taylor, Andrew
    Basu, Ranu
    Wang, Lei
    Education, remoteness and population dynamics2011Inngår i: Demography at the edge: remote human populations in developed nations / [ed] Dean Carson, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Prescott Ensign, Lee Huskey, Andrew Taylor, Farnham: Ashgate, 2011, s. 255-269Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 4. Bird, Deanne
    et al.
    Govan, Jeanie
    Murphy, Helen
    Harwood, Sharon
    Haynes, Katharine
    Carson, Dean B
    The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University; Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Flinders University.
    Russell, Stephen
    King, David
    Wensing, Ed
    Tsakissiris, Nicole
    Larkin, Steven
    Future change in ancient worlds: indigenous adaptation in northern Australia2013Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Carson, Dean
    The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory 0909, Australia.
    Political economy, demography and development in Australia's Northern Territory2011Inngår i: The Canadian Geographer, Vol. 55, nr 2, s. 226-242Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Canadian 'staples thesis' literature has documented both the risks (in the tradition of Harold Innis) and the opportunities (in the tradition of W. A. Macintosh) inherent in economies that are dependent on the export of minimally processed natural resources. The key risk is that of retarded long‐term growth as a result of a lack of diversification and over‐dependence on foreign capital and markets. This article argues that the demographic consequences of staples approaches to development also make it difficult to achieve diversification. It profiles Australia's Northern Territory as an example of a mining‐dependent (fiscal) economy that demonstrates a particular demographic profile consistent with what might be expected of a resource frontier. The article argues, however, that restrictive demographic characteristics persist (high sex ratios, high population mobility, disadvantaged position of indigenous people and remote dwellers) even though mining has become an insignificant direct employer (less than one percent of the workforce) and the services sector drives the labour market. This persistence can be linked to the Territory and federal government expectations of economic development patterns in the region and the frontier mythology created around the Northern Territory. Addressing the demographic imbalance is a critical step towards realizing ambitions for economic diversification.

  • 6.
    Carson, Dean
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Population policies at the edge: the demographic ambitions of frontiers2011Inngår i: Demography at the edge: remote human populations in developed nations / [ed] Dean Carson, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Prescott Ensign, Lee Huskey, Andrew Taylor, Farnham: Ashgate, 2011, s. 321-332Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 7. Carson, Dean
    Skilled Labour Migration Flows to Australia's Northern Territory 2001-2006: Beyond Periphery?2011Inngår i: Australian Journal of Labour Economics, ISSN 1328-1143, Vol. 14, nr 1, s. 15-33Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 8.
    Carson, Dean B.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Conclusion2016Inngår i: Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, s. 427-434Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Carson, Dean B
    et al.
    Flinders University Rural Clinical School, Flinders University, Burra, Australia ; The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Carson, Doris A
    Centre for Regional Engagement, University of South Australia, Whyalla, Australia.
    Local economies of mobility in sparsely populated areas: cases from Australia's spine2014Inngår i: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 36, s. 340-349Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing contemporary body of literature about the 'new mobilities' – increasingly mobile populations and their impacts on local economies, particularly in more sparsely populated areas of developed nations. Much of the focus has been on the 'fly in/fly out' workforce associated with mining projects, but attention has also been paid to increasing numbers of 'fly in/fly out' workers in the health sector, the changing nature of tourist populations, the use of temporary contract labour for government administration, and the movement of Indigenous people from remote communities into urban centres. This paper uses five case examples in South Australia and the Northern Territory (Australia's 'spine') to examine the diversity of experiences of the new mobilities. The paper presents a framework for investigating new mobilities at the local settlement level through developing an understanding of macro and micro factors driving mobility and the consequences in terms of aspects of social and economic distance between mobile populations and host communities. The framework provides for useful insights to be drawn from secondary data sources including the Australian Census and tourist surveys. The paper concludes that the geographic characteristics of short term mobility observed in this research essentially conform to the 'Eight Ds' model of the human and economic geography of sparsely populated areas.

  • 10.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Nordin, Gabriella
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden2016Inngår i: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 16, s. 13-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has identified a series of human geography impacts of natural resource developments in sparsely populated areas like the Arctic. These impacts can be mapped to the 'resource cycle', and arise from periods of population growth and decline, changing patterns of human migration and mobility, changing patterns of settlement, and changes in the demographic 'balance' between males and females, young and old, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. This paper examines the applicability of the resource cycle model in the case of hydro energy development in the Jokkmokk municipality of Sweden. Using quantitative demographic data, media reports, and contemporary accounts of hydro development, the paper describes the human geography of Jokkmokk since the late 19th century. The paper concludes that changes in human geography in Jokkmokk mirror what has been observed in regions dependent on non-renewable resources, although it is difficult to distinguish many impacts from those that might have occurred under alternative development scenarios. The paper identifies a 'settlement cycle' with phases of integrated and separated habitation for populations specifically associated with the development. Settlement dynamics, and the impacts of hydro on Sami geography are areas for further research.

  • 11.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Porter, Rob
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Yoshida Ahlin, Celia
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Decline, Adaptation or Transformation: New Perspectives on Demographic Change in Resource Peripheries in Australia and Sweden2016Inngår i: Comparative Population Studies, ISSN 1869-8980, E-ISSN 1869-8999, Vol. 41, nr 3-4, s. 1-29Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Many sparsely populated resource peripheries in developed countries are perceived to suffer from periods of demographic decline due to loss of employment opportunities and services, youth out-migration and population ageing. While these trends tend to apply at broad regional scales and for particular time periods, diverse patterns of demographic change may be apparent if different spatial, temporal and social scales of analysis are taken into consideration. Comparing the experiences of two case study regions in northern Sweden and inland South Australia, this paper proposes an alternative conceptual framework to the ‘discourse of decline’, which could be used to examine the nuances of demographic change within resource peripheries. The framework includes spatial scale considerations that contrast broader regional demographic patterns with the experiences of sub-regions and individual settlements. It also includes temporal scale aspects, examining demographic change over different time periods to understand the pace, duration and frequency of population growth and decline. The framework finally includes social unit considerations, emphasising that demographic change affects different social groups in different ways. The results of the case studies suggest that considering demographic change as adaptation or transformation rather than decline may be more useful for identifying new – and qualitatively different – demographic pathways that emerge over time. 

  • 12.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Carson, Doris A.
    University of South Australia, Australia.
    Taylor, Andrew
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Indigenous Long Grassers: Itinerants or Problem Tourists?2013Inngår i: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 42, s. 1-21Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper proposes a model explaining how ‘problem tourists’ emerge at tourism destinations. Problem tourists are incompatible with the accepted dominant status of tourism and emerge from social distance between tourists and hosts, or between different groups of tourists. A case study of long grassers in Darwin, the capital of Australia’s Northern Territory, is presented to illustrate the model. Long grassers are popularly understood as Indigenous people from remote communities who camp in public places during their visits to Darwin and engage in anti-social behaviours. Surveys were conducted on travel patterns of long grassers to better understand their behaviours and interactions with the destination. This paper discusses whether conceptualising long grassers as problem tourists might help reveal new management strategies.

  • 13.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Flinders University, Australia; The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Koch, A.
    Divining the local: specific challenges for place based planning in sparsely populated areas2013Inngår i: Local Economy, ISSN 0269-0942, E-ISSN 1470-9325, Vol. 28, nr 3, s. 304-319Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the processes of demographic change is critical for economic and services planning. Often times, planning in ‘rural’ areas is based on an assumption of homogenous populations and drivers of change (ageing, declining traditional rural industries, adaptation to changing environments and so on). This article argues that attention to spatial, social and temporal scales reveals great diversity between places and within places with regards to demographic change and economic potential. We use evidence from seemingly incomparable case examples from the Alpine villages of Austria and the remote Indigenous communities of Australia to demonstrate that differences in mobility over time and between social groups results in very different experiences of local economies. Specifically, social groups (and individuals) experience the local within their own actor-networks. The article examines how the diverse experiences of the local might be measured, and why they are important for ‘local’ policy making and planning. The research is grounded in theories of social and human geography around ‘fragmented development’, actor-network theory and scale.

  • 14.
    Carson, Dean B
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Prideaux, Bruce
    The importance of the mode of transport in self-drive tourism2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 121-123Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Carson, Dean B
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Schmallegger, Doris
    Campbell, Suzanne
    Martel, Catherine
    Whose City is it?: A thinking guide to Darwin2010Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 16.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Glesbygdsmedicinskt Centrum, Storuman, Sweden .
    Schoo, Adrian
    Berggren, Peter
    The 'rural pipeline' and retention of rural health professionals in Europe's northern peripheries2015Inngår i: Health Policy, ISSN 0168-8510, E-ISSN 1872-6054, Vol. 119, nr 12, s. 1550-1556Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The major advance in informing rural workforce policy internationally over the past 25 years has been the recognition of the importance of the 'rural pipeline'. The rural pipeline suggests that people with 'rural origin' (who spent some childhood years in rural areas) and/or 'rural exposure' (who do part of their professional training in rural areas) are more likely to select rural work locations. What is not known is whether the rural pipeline also increases the length of time professionals spend in rural practice throughout their careers. This paper analyses data from a survey of rural health professionals in six countries in the northern periphery of Europe in 2013 to examine the relationship between rural origin and rural exposure and the intention to remain in the current rural job or to preference rural jobs in future. Results are compared between countries, between different types of rural areas (based on accessibility to urban centres), different occupations and workers at different stages of their careers. The research concludes that overall the pipeline does impact on retention, and that both rural origin and rural exposure make a contribution. However, the relationship is not strong in all contexts, and health workforce policy should recognise that retention may in some cases be improved by recruiting beyond the pipeline.

  • 17.
    Carson, Dean B
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    The local demography of resource economies: long term implications of natural resource industries for demographic development in sparsely populated areas2016Inngår i: Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations / [ed] Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, s. 357-378Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Settlements at the Edge examines the evolution, characteristics, functions and shifting economic basis of settlements in sparsely populated areas of developed nations. With a focus on demographic change, the book features theoretical and applied cases which explore the interface between demography, economy, well-being and the environment. This book offers a comprehensive and insightful knowledge base for understanding the role of population in shaping the development and histories of northern sparsely populated areas of developed nations including Alaska (USA), Australia, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland and other nations with territories within the Arctic Circle.

  • 18.
    Carson, Dean B
    et al.
    Flinders University.
    Wellstead, Adam
    Government with a Cast of Dozens: Policy Capacity Risks and Policy Work in the Northern Territory2015Inngår i: Australian journal of public administration, ISSN 0313-6647, E-ISSN 1467-8500, Vol. 74, nr 2, s. 162-175Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There are a number challenges to maintaining high-quality policy capacity in sparsely populated areas such as Australia's Northern Territory (e.g. natural resource dependent economy, prominence of Indigenous issues, provision of local services). Moreover, the Territory government has recently been undergoing a host of public sector changes. This paper utilises survey methodologies of policy workers that were recently developed in Canada and examines nine risk factors to policy work. A survey of 119 policy workers in the Northern Territory was conducted in 2013. The analysis examined four key policy-work areas (policy activities, barriers, areas for improved policy capacity, nature of change in work environment). The survey findings offer some practical insights for managers. Formal policy-work training is recognised as critical. Policy capacity may be increased through better inter-departmental (and potentially inter-governmental) cooperation and information sharing, more opportunities to engage with non-governmental stakeholders, and more opportunities for those leaving the full-time Northern Territory policy workforce to continue to contribute. From a conceptual point of view, the extent to which policy capacity' as commonly conceived in the literature is applicable to contexts, such as Australia's Northern Territory, warrants further examination.

  • 19.
    Carson, Dean B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Wenghofer, E.F
    Timony, P.E
    Schoo, A
    Berggren, P
    Charters, B
    White, D
    Vuin, A
    Garrett, J
    Recruitment and retention of professional labour: the health workforce at settlement level2016Inngår i: Settlements at the edge: remote human settlements in developed nations / [ed] Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen and Gertrude Saxinger, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 20.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Northern Institute, CDU & Flinders University.
    Bird, D.
    Bell, L.
    Yuhun, P.
    Migration as an Adaptation to Climate Change for Remote Indigenous Communities: What might we expect?2013Inngår i: Inner Asia Studies in the Humanities, Vol. 2, s. 92-111Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 21.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Northern Institute, CDU and Flinders University.
    Carson, Doris
    University of South Australia, Northern Institute, CDU.
    Mobilising Labour in Remote ‘Boom’ Towns for Economic Diversification: The case of Tennant Creek, Australia2013Inngår i: Inner Asia Studies in the Humanities, Vol. 2, s. 31-44Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    New economic opportunities in remote areas are often linked to major private and public sector investment projects which are controlled by external decision-makers and lead to temporary periods of economic ‘boom’. Settlements in sparsely populated or remote areas in countries such as Australia, Canada, the United States and the Arctic European nations, are commonly perceived to be inherently disadvantaged socially and economically because of their isolation from social services, economic and political power centres [Carson et al., 2011; Huskey, 2011]. Even when economic opportunities present for a number of remote locations as a result of the mineral and oil and gas resources ‘booms’, the benefits are believed to accrue primarily to distant large urban centres where resource extraction companies are based [Argent, 2013]. Income derived from employment in the resources sector is channelled away from sparsely populated areas by the use of non-resident and temporarily resident labour, with little in the way of local employment [Carrington and Pereira, 2011]. Through a series of case studies of small settlements in remote parts of Alaska, Huskey (2011) demonstrated that local engagement in various economic activities is possible and can deliver local social and economic benefit. This research examines Husky’s arguments about the potential for sustainable local economic development through a case study of a small and isolated settlement, Tennant Creek, in Australia’s Northern Territory. By analysing local labour changes from 2001 to 2011, the research examined the town’s capacity to mobilise its labour force and diversify in response to new opportunities offered by a range of economic ‘booms’ in the mining, construction, transport, tourism, health, education and government service sectors. This brief is a summary of a full research paper which is published in the journal Bulletin Buryat State University: Inner Asia Studies in the Humanities (Carson & Carson, 2013).

  • 22.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Cartan, Greg
    Touring routes - types, successes and failures: an international review2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 296-310Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23. Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Cleary, Jen
    Virtual realities: How remote dwelling populations become more remote over time despite technological improvements2010Inngår i: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 2, nr 5, s. 1282-1296Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    School for Social and Policy Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Coe, Kristal
    Zander, Kerstin
    Garnett, Stephen
    Does the type of job matter?: Recruitment to Australia's Northern Territory2010Inngår i: Employee relations, ISSN 0142-5455, E-ISSN 1758-7069, Vol. 32, nr 2, s. 121-137Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to synthesise three separate but similar studies into the motivations of accountants, engineers, and nurses to come to Australia’s Northern Territory. Gordon’s job structures model and the labour force development implications of staples thesis are to be used to provide a view of the differences between types of jobs.

    Design/methodology/approach – Separate surveys of accountants, engineers and nurses registered in the Northern Territory were conducted in 2006 and 2007. Similarities in design between the studies allowed comparisons to be made regarding responses to questions about motives to move to the Northern Territory. Comparisons between the job groups were made on the basis of responses to individual motives, and a principal components analysis was used to identify groups of motives.

    Findings – Nurses were more likely than engineers to be motivated to work with indigenous people and by their own family and social issues. Accountants were similar to engineers with regards to working with indigenous people, and similar to nurses with regards to family and social migration motives.

    Practical implications – Growing the professional workforce in the Northern Territory is a prominent government policy objective. This study shows that different approaches to recruitment need to be taken with workers in different professions.

    Originality/value – One of the weaknesses in existing academic literature on recruitment and retention of professionals in rural and remote areas is a lack of studies comparing rural migration motives of labour employed in different types of jobs. This study covers those aspects of the field.

  • 25.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Ensign, Prescott C
    Rasmussen, Rasmus Ole
    Taylor, Andrew
    Perspectives on 'demography at the edge'2011Inngår i: Demography at the edge: remote human populations in developed nations / [ed] Dean Carson, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Prescott Ensign, Lee Huskey, Andrew Taylor, Farnham: Ashgate, 2011, s. 3-20Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 26.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Flinders University School of Medicine & The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Flinders University, Nuriootpa, South Australia.
    Koster, Rhonda
    Addressing the problem of Indigenous disadvantage in remote areas of developed nations: a plea for more comparative research2012Inngår i: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 110-125Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been well documented that Indigenous populations in developed ‘postcolonial’ nations (such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States) experience disadvantage in a number of areas when compared with their non-Indigenous counterparts. Despite (or perhaps because of) a range of policy initiatives and political approaches to addressing disadvantage, there continues to be poor understandings of what 'works' and under what conditions. There is a body of literature which compares conditions, political ideas and policy initiatives across the jurisdictions, but the bases for comparison are poorly described; there is insufficient linking of research into ‘ideas’ with research into initiatives and their outcomes, and there is insufficient engagement of Indigenous people in the research. This paper proposes a more rigorous approach to comparative research that is based on principals of partnership with and participation of Indigenous people. We conclude that well designed participatory comparative research can not only provide new insights to old problems, but can improve Indigenous people's access to global knowledge systems.

  • 27.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    School of Medicine, Flinders University, Nuriootpa, South Australia; The Northern Institute,Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.
    McConnel, Fred
    Indigenous health and community services employment in remote Northern Territory: a baseline examination of 2006 and 2011 Census data2011Inngår i: The Australian journal of rural health, ISSN 1038-5282, E-ISSN 1440-1584, Vol. 19, nr 5, s. 255-258Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish a baseline of levels of Indigenous professional engagement in the health and community services sector in remote Northern Territory.

    Design: Analysis of data from 2001 and 2006 Census.

    Setting: Northern Territory – Balance Statistical Division.

    Participants: Persons employed in health and community services sector in 2006.

    Main outcome measures: Indigenous status, level of education, current education status, occupation type and residential mobility.

    Results: Indigenous employment grew by 137% between 2001 and 2006. In 2006, 42% of Indigenous employees were labourers and 9% professionals, in contrast to non‐Indigenous workers of whom 41% were professionals and 5% labourers. Over 50% of workers who moved into the region between 2001 and 2006 were professionals, compared with 20% of those who had remained in the region. Indigenous in‐migrants were twice as likely as Indigenous people who had stayed in the region to be professionals. Indigenous workers were much less likely to have post‐school educational qualifications than non‐Indigenous workers. Indigenous workers were also less likely to be studying for a post‐school qualification. Indigenous in‐migrants were three times as likely to have post‐school qualifications than Indigenous people who had remained in the region and were also more likely to be enrolled in post‐school education.

    Conclusions: The baseline is low Indigenous engagement as professional labour, and low Indigenous engagement in formal education. Mobile Indigenous people have higher levels of engagement. The situation might be addressed by increased formal education in remote areas and increased mobility of Indigenous health labour.

  • 28.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Prideaux, Bruce
    What now?: Concluding remarks2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 369-373Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 29.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Schmallegger, Doris
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Drive tourism: a view from the road2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 358-368Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 30.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Schmallegger, Doris
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Harwood, Sharon
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    A City for the Temporary?: Political Economy and Urban Planning in Darwin, Australia2010Inngår i: Urban Policy and Research, ISSN 0811-1146, E-ISSN 1476-7244, Vol. 28, nr 3, s. 293-310Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Darwin, in Australia’s Northern Territory, faces urban planning challenges consistent with those reported in ‘resource peripheries’ around the world. The city has recently experienced strong population growth associated with resources and construction projects, and an increase in public sector workers sent to address the challenges faced by remote (particularly Indigenous) populations. The Northern Territory Government is determined to foster further growth, and promotes ‘major projects’ in urban development as the key. Analysis of the public debates about two recent major projects (the Waterfront Development and the Lyons residential development) reveal a planning process consistent with the clientelism observed by Rayner and Howlett (2009) in resource peripheries in Canada. The risks of clientelism are both the marginalisation of important internal publics and the institutionalisation of ‘temporariness’ as the driver of growth. Shifting to a more consultative planning process might help stimulate internal development, but could also put at risk the relationships that the Northern Territory Government has established with external investors.

  • 31.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia; Flinders University, Australia.
    Stehlik, Daniela
    Temporary guides and long term policy challenges: the view from remote Australia2012Inngår i: Sustainability and short-term policies: improving governance in spatial policy interventions / [ed] Stefan Sjöblom, Kjell Andersson, Terry Marsden, Sarah Skerratt, Farnham: Ashgate, 2012, s. 81-100Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 32.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Waldhoer, Klemens
    Realising the value of self-drive day trips to Lower Austria2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 61-70Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 33.
    Carson, Doris A.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Carson, Dean B.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Path Dependence in Remote Area Tourism Development: Why institutional legacies matter2017Inngår i: Tourism Destination Evolution / [ed] Patrick Brouder, Salvador Anton Clavé, Allison Gill, Dimitri Ioannides, Milton Park: Routledge, 2017, s. 103-122Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 34.
    Carson, Doris A
    et al.
    University of South Australia, Australia.
    Carson, Dean B
    Flinders University, Australia.
    Hodge, Heidi
    Flinders University, Australia.
    Understanding Local Innovation Systems in Peripheral Tourism Destinations2014Inngår i: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 16, nr 3, s. 457-473Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism destinations in peripheral areas are often large regions established by centralised government agencies to encourage collaboration between dispersed communities and foster innovation. Relatively little research attention has been paid to the impact that centrally defined destination boundaries have on whether and how small communities contribute to innovation at a regional level. This paper examines the case of Burra, a small town in rural South Australia. It analyses the networking, collaboration and knowledge exchange behaviour of tourism stakeholders in the context of the state-government-defined 'Clare Valley' tourism region. Data were drawn from a web-based social network analysis, in-depth interviews, historic document analysis and field observations. The study found that the local tourism system had limited aspirations and capabilities to collaborate with other towns in the region. Lack of regional engagement was only partially due to intra-regional competition and resistance to regional boundaries. More significant barriers included a local culture of operating in isolation, an embedded reliance on public sector leadership to manage systemic interactions, an aging system with limited ambition to change and an inability to harness in-migrants and externally based stakeholders to stimulate knowledge transfer. Changing the imposed destination boundaries would have limited impact on the operation of the local system. The paper concludes that effective regional destination development in peripheral areas needs to be better informed by more detailed understandings of local tourism systems and their capacities to engage.

  • 35.
    Carson, Doris A
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Carson, Dean BUmeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).Lundmark, LindaUmeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Tourism, mobilities, and development in sparsely populated areas2016Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism 'mobilities' are not restricted to the movement of tourists between places of origin and destinations. Particularly in more peripheral, remote, or sparsely populated destinations, workers and residents are also likely to be frequently moving between locations. Such destinations attract seasonal or temporary residents, sometimes with only loose ties to the tourism industry. These flows of mobile populations are accompanied by flows of other resources – money, knowledge, ideas and innovations – which can be used to help the economic and social development of the destination. This book examines key aspects of the human mobilities associated with tourism in sparsely populated areas, and investigates how new mobility patterns inspired by technological, economic, political, and social change provide both opportunities and risks for those areas. Examples are drawn from the northern peripheries of Europe and the north of Australia, and the book provides a framework for continuing research into the role that tourism and 'new mobilities' can play in regional development in these locations.

  • 36.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. University of South Australia, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Charles Darwin University, Australia; Flinders University, Australia.
    Mobilities and path dependence: challenges for tourism and "attractive" industry development in a remote company town2016Inngår i: Tourism, mobilities and development in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Doris Carson, Dean B. Carson, Linda Lundmark, Routledge, 2016, s. 108-127Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 37.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. Centre for Regional Engagement, University of South Australia, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia ; Flinders University Rural Clinical School, Flinders University, Australia.
    Mobilities and path dependence: challenges for tourism and "attractive" industry development in a remote company town2014Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 460-479Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the impacts of resource-based path dependence on alternative development scenarios in remote company towns, with a particular focus on understanding the prospects for new path creation in tourism and other "attractive" industries, such as retirement and lifestyle migration. The paper applies a mobilities perspective to the idea of path dependence in remote resource frontiers to analyse how the flows of people, skills and capital can become locked in by a range of factors, such as investments in infrastructure and transport technologies, established network connections for labour and knowledge provision, traditional economic development policies, and entrenched mobility cultures. The research examines the case of Nhulunbuy, a remote mining town in northern Australia, which currently faces severe socio-economic decline due to the closure of its alumina refinery. Using a range of secondary data sources, including population statistics and public documents, the case study traces Nhulunbuy's development path since the 1970s and identifies a number of exogenous and endogenous causes for the potential lock-in of its mobilities trajectory. The implications for alternative pathways in tourism and other "attractive" industries are discussed, focusing on identifying the institutional and infrastructural changes required to unlock mobility flows.

  • 38.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    International winter tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden: understanding migration, lifestyle, and business motivations2018Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 18, nr 2, s. 183-198Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the migration, lifestyle and business motivations of international winter tourism entrepreneurs who have moved to a “low-amenity” rural area in northern Sweden. Low-amenity areas are characterised by economic decline, outmigration and limited tourism development. Based on qualitative interviews, the research applied a multi-dimensional framework to the study of migrant tourism entrepreneurship, considering personal migration drivers, the value of location-specific amenities, desired consumptive experiences, previous familiarity with the destination, business-related goals, as well as temporal and technological dimensions of mobility and self-employment. The findings suggest that the northern winter and the undeveloped low-amenity character of the place were key factors in migration choices. Consumptive lifestyle interests around counter-urban living and winter outdoor hobbies were prominent, yet there was diversity in terms of business aspirations and considerable seasonal lifestyle-business balancing. Despite noticeable contributions to winter tourism development in the low-amenity north, the study also identified a sense of temporariness and expected onward migration among migrants, raising questions about the longevity of this development.

  • 39.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Centre for Regional Engagement, University of South Australia, Whyalla, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Flinders University Rural Clinical School, Burra, Australia.
    Hodge, Heidi
    Understanding local innovation systems in peripheral tourism destinations2015Inngår i: Managing and adapting to global change in tourism places / [ed] Alan A. Lew, New York: Routledge, 2015, s. 115-131Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. University of South Australia, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Flinders University, Burra, Australia.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Tourism and mobilities in sparsely populated areas: towards a framework and research agenda2016Inngår i: Tourism, mobilities and development in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Doris Carson, Dean B. Carson, Linda Lundmark, Routledge, 2016, s. 1-12Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. Centre for Regional Engagement, University of South Australia, Whyalla, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia ; Flinders University Rural Clinical School, Flinders University, Burra, Australia.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Tourism and mobilities in sparsely populated areas: towards a framework and research agenda2014Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 353-366Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42. Cartan, Greg
    et al.
    Carson, Dean
    Charles Darwin University .
    Organising tourism providers on remote tracks as geographically dispersed teams2011Inngår i: Journal of Contemporary Issues in Business and Government, ISSN 1323-6903, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 69-85Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Australian outback is a popular tourism destination. Iconic four wheel drive touring tracks are particularly attractive. This study considers how tourism providers are organised in remote touring tracks (RTTs) through a case study of the Oodnadatta Track. A framework developed from the geographically dispersed teams’ (GDTs) literature provided the analytical lens for the study. This framework produced a useful description and explanation of the contemporary context and also a tentative improvement agenda. Particularly noteworthy was the question of leadership, which emerged as an influential and pervasive factor.

  • 43.
    Goicolea, Isabel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Carson, Dean
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Demography and Growth Planning, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Centre for Rural Medicine, Storuman, Sweden.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Christianson, Monica
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Fysioterapi.
    Hurtig, Anna-Karin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Health care access for rural youth on equal terms?: A mixed methods study protocol in northern Sweden2018Inngår i: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 17, artikkel-id 6Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this paper is to propose a protocol for researching the impact of rural youth health service strategies on health care access. There has been no published comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of youth health strategies in rural areas, and there is no clearly articulated model of how such assessments might be conducted. The protocol described here aims to gather information to; i) Assess rural youth access to health care according to their needs, ii) Identify and understand the strategies developed in rural areas to promote youth access to health care, and iii) Propose actions for further improvement. The protocol is described with particular reference to research being undertaken in the four northernmost counties of Sweden, which contain a widely dispersed and diverse youth population.

    METHODS: The protocol proposes qualitative and quantitative methodologies sequentially in four phases. First, to map youth access to health care according to their health care needs, including assessing horizontal equity (equal use of health care for equivalent health needs,) and vertical equity (people with greater health needs should receive more health care than those with lesser needs). Second, a multiple case study design investigates strategies developed across the region (youth clinics, internet applications, public health programs) to improve youth access to health care. Third, qualitative comparative analysis of the 24 rural municipalities in the region identifies the best combination of conditions leading to high youth access to health care. Fourth, a concept mapping study involving rural stakeholders, care providers and youth provides recommended actions to improve rural youth access to health care.

    DISCUSSION: The implementation of this research protocol will contribute to 1) generating knowledge that could contribute to strengthening rural youth access to health care, as well as to 2) advancing the application of mixed methods to explore access to health care.

  • 44. Harwood, Sharon
    et al.
    Carson, Dean B
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Marino, Elizabeth
    McTurk, Nick
    Weather hazards, place and resilience in the remote Norths2011Inngår i: Demography at the edge: remote human populations in developed nations / [ed] Dean Carson, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Prescott Ensign, Lee Huskey, Andrew Taylor, Farnham: Ashgate, 2011, s. 308-320Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 45. Harwood, Sharon
    et al.
    Carson, Dean
    Flinders University Rural Clinical School, Australia.
    Wensing, Ed
    Jackson, Luke
    Natural hazard resilient communities and land use planning: the limitations of planning governance in tropical Australia2014Inngår i: Journal of Geography & Natural Disasters, ISSN 2167-0587, Vol. 4, nr 2, artikkel-id 1000130Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how two Australian land use planning systems address the creation of hazard resilient communities in tropical areas. The application of substantive hazard knowledge and how this influences the associated procedures within the planning system is examined. The case studies of Darwin the capital of the Northern Territory, and the beachside suburb of Machans Beach within the Cairns Regional Council in far north Queensland are investigated. Both case study locations have experienced tropical cyclones since settlement and despite their hazard prone locations, both have intensified over their 120 year existence. Moreover, it is predicted that cyclones in tropical Australia will decrease in number, but increase in intensity. It would be rational to assume that industry, community and government would actively pursue planning strategies to negate the risks of natural hazards and the corresponding level of vulnerability to a hazard event. However, neither communities nor planning are driven by rational technical decision making processes. The paper concludes that the rhetoric for creating hazard resilient communities dominates national and state government policy, however this has minimal influence upon the legal framework that protects development rights. It would appear that the safe development paradox is present in the Australian land use planning system, and that the focus of planning is on creating certainty of development rights and achieving efficiencies through urban settlement patterns, as opposed to creating hazard resilient communities.

  • 46. Haynes, Katharine
    et al.
    Bird, Deanne K
    Carson, D.B
    School of Medicine, Flinders University and the Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Indigenous experiences and responses to Cyclone Tracy2014Inngår i: Applied studies in climate adaptation / [ed] Jean P. Palutikof, Sarah L. Boulter, Jon Barnett and David Rissik, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, s. 297-306Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 47. Haynes, Katharine
    et al.
    Bird, Deanne K.
    Carson, Dean B.
    Flinders University; Charles Darwin University.
    Larkin, Steve
    Mason, Matthew
    Adaptation lessons from Cyclone Tracy part II: Institutional response and Indigenous experiences of Cyclone Tracy2011Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    At the time of Cyclone Tracy in 1974, Darwin's population included a substantial number of both permanent and transitory Aboriginal people (members of the Larrakia people and the Stolen Generation). This retrospective study collated the experiences of 37 people (23 Indigenous, 14 key government officials). In general, Indigenous people did not appear to have been treated substantially differently from non-Indigenous people in terms of evacuation procedures, health care or resettlement. Some Indigenous study participants discussed how they had been aware of traditional knowledge, but due to their cultural heritage being mixed with a more contemporary Australian education they had not taken the Indigenous early warnings seriously. The interviews revealed that in many ways, Indigenous people considered that they were better better able to cope and recover from the disaster than non-Indigenous people, as they were often more self sufficient than their non-Indigenous neighbours. Their resilience came from not being as reliant on material possessions, their ability to rely on the land for food, and the many family connections and people whom they could get help from. This research has demonstrated that much of the Indigenous population living in Darwin is fairly urbanised and although they retain Indigenous cultural heritage, they are able to work with standard Australian emergency management warnings and procedures. The exception to this is the transient, itinerant Indigenous people and those living in rural areas outside of Darwin who may be without shelter and connection to communities. There is a need for emergency management protocols to also consider the particular vulnerability of such transient itinerant individuals.

  • 48. Heidelbeer, Daniel
    et al.
    Carson, Dean B
    Rural and Remote Research, Flinders University, Burra, South Australia, Australia.
    Experiences of non-resident nurses in Australia's remote Northern Territory2013Inngår i: Rural and remote health, ISSN 1445-6354, Vol. 13, nr 3, artikkel-id 2464Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is emerging concern in the health literature about the impacts of non-resident work modes on the quality of service delivery particularly in sparsely populated or remote areas, but little is known about what non-resident health workers themselves see as the advantages and disadvantages of their modes of work, and whether non-resident workers face the same or different social/personal and professional barriers to rural and remote practice as their resident colleagues. Although literature from the resources sector provides insights into the expected social/personal advantages and disadvantages, very little is said about professional issues. Methods: This article reports on semi-structured interviews conducted with seven non-resident nurses working in remote locations in Australia's Northern Territory in 2011. All nurses lived outside the Northern Territory when not at work. The interviews focussed on how the separation of place of residence and place of work affected nurses' private and professional lives. Results: Social/personal issues faced by these nurses are similar to what has been reported in the broader literature on non-resident work. Nurses who successfully engage in non-resident work develop strategies to manage their lives across multiple locations. However, questions are raised about the professional impacts of non-resident work, in terms of the continuing competency of the workers themselves, the performance of work teams that consist of resident and non-resident workers, and the maintenance of context-specific skills. Conclusions: Non-resident work is likely to become more common in remote areas such as Australia's Northern Territory because of the advantages workers experience in their personal lives. There is an urgent need to address professional issues associated with non-resident work modes.

  • 49. Hodge, Heidi
    et al.
    Carson, Doris
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, Australia; The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Carson, Dean
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Mid North Knowledge Partnership, Flinders Rural Health South Australia, Flinders University, Australia; The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Newman, Lareen
    Garrett, Jaimee
    Using Internet technologies in rural communities to access services: the views of older people and service providers2017Inngår i: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 54, s. 469-478Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people in rural communities increasingly rely on the Internet to access essential health, finance, education, and other social services. However, their abilities to participate in the online service system are often undermined by a continuing 'digital divide'. This divide may be exacerbated by the strategies of service providers who fail to recognise and respond to the needs of older rural clients. This paper is based on a case study in Clare, a small rural town in South Australia, and examines the experiences of older residents and local service providers in trying to engage online for digital service delivery. Drawing on two sets of in-depth interviews, the study uses a mix of thematic content analysis and social network analysis to identify the nature and extent of digital interactions between older people and service providers, and the enablers and challenges for online service engagement. Older participants demonstrated considerable interest in learning how to use the Internet for accessing particular services, with social support networks and third party facilitators being crucial enablers. Service providers' ambitions to engage with older people online appeared more limited as a result of entrenched stereotypes of older non-users, a lack of internal digital skills, as well as organisational and funding constraints. The case study findings emphasise the importance of balancing the views of older people and service providers in the design of online engagement strategies. These insights are critical for improving online service delivery in rural communities affected by an increasing withdrawal of physical services.

  • 50. Hogan, Anthony
    et al.
    Carson, Dean
    Flinders University School of Medicine; Charles Darwin University.
    Cleary, Jen
    Carson, Doris
    University of South Australia.
    Mercer, Rob
    Donnelly, David
    Houghton, Kim
    Tanton, Robert
    Phillips, Rebecca
    The Community Adaptability Tool (CAT): a guide to using the Community Adaptability Tool to secure the wealth and wellbeing of rural communities2014Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
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