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  • 1.
    Jemberie, Wossenseged Birhane
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). The Swedish National Graduate School on Aging and Health (SWEAH), Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    McCarty, Dennis
    School of Public Health, Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States.
    Lundgren, Lena M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Cross-National Behavioral Health Laboratory, Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver, Denver, CO, United States.
    Hospital admission rate, cumulative hospitalized days, and time to admission among older persons with substance use and psychiatric conditions2022In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 13, article id 882542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Substance use among older persons occurs with medical and psychiatric comorbidities. This study examined the associations of substance use disorder (SUD), psychiatric, and dual diagnoses with 12-month cumulative hospitalized days, hospital admission rate and number of days to first hospitalization.

    Methods: The cohort of 3,624 individuals (28.2% women) aged 50 years or older was assessed for substance use severity in 65 Swedish municipalities during March 2003–May 2017. Addiction Severity Index data were linked to hospital discharge records and crime statistics. The outcomes were (a) 12-month cumulative hospitalized days; (b) Hospital admission rate, and (c) days to first hospitalization. Generalized linear regression techniques investigated associations between outcomes and SUD, psychiatric and dual diagnoses at admission.

    Results: During 2003–2017, 73.5% of the participants were hospitalized. Twelve-month hospitalized days were positively associated with SUD (Incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.26–1.58), dual diagnosis (IRR = 2.03, 95%CI: 1.74–2.36), and psychiatric diagnoses (IRR = 2.51, 95%CI: 2.09–3.01). Hospital admission rate was positively associated with SUD (IRR = 4.67, 95%CI: 4.28–5.08), dual diagnosis (IRR = 1.83, 95%CI: 1.64–2.04), and psychiatric diagnoses (IRR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.55–1.92). Days to first hospitalization were negatively associated with SUD (IRR = 0.52, 95%CI: 0.47–0.58), dual diagnosis (IRR = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.50–0.65), and psychiatric diagnoses (IRR = 0.83, 95%CI: 0.73–0.93). The marginal effects of SUD and/or mental disorders increased with age for all outcomes, except for days to first hospitalization.

    Conclusion: Three of four older persons assessed for substance use severity were later hospitalized. Substance use disorders, dual diagnoses and other mental disorders were the primary reasons for hospitalization and were associated with longer stays, earlier hospitalization, and repeated admissions. Sensitizing service providers to old age substance use and sharing data across the care continuum could provide multiple points of contact to reduce the risk of hospitalizations among older persons with problematic substance use.

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  • 2.
    Jemberie, Wossenseged Birhane
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). The Swedish National Graduate School on Aging and Health (SWEAH), Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    McCarty, Dennis
    Oregon Health and Science UniversityPortland State University, School of Public Health, Portland, OR, USA.
    Lundgren, Lena M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Cross-National Behavioral Health Laboratory, Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA.
    Recurrent risk of hospitalization among older persons with problematic alcohol use: a multiple failure‐time analysis with a discontinuous risk model2022In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 117, no 9, p. 2415-2430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Older persons with problematic alcohol use vary in psychosocial functioning, age of onset for problem drinking and use of other drugs. The study measured the differential risks of all-cause, alcohol, polydrug and psychiatric-related repeated hospitalizations among older persons with problematic alcohol use.

    Design: A linked register-based cohort study with discontinuous multiple-failure (time-to-repeated-event) data. Hospitalization and mortality were considered as failure.

    Setting: Sweden, March 2003-November 2017, using data from the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) register linked to National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register.

    Participants: 50 years and older (n= 1741; 28% women), with one or more alcohol problem days in the 30 days before an ASI assessment.

    Measurements: Five mutually exclusive latent classes of problematic alcohol use, identified with eleven ASI items, were the independent variables: “Late Onset with Fewer Consequence (LO:FC; reference group)”; “Early Onset/Prevalent Multi-Dimensional problems (EO:MD)”; “Late Onset with co-occurring Anxiety and Depression (LO:AD)”; “Early Onset with co-occurring Psychiatric Problems (EO:PP)”; and “Early Onset with major Alcohol Problem (EO:AP)”. Covariates included sociodemographic characteristics, previous hospitalization and Elixhauser comorbidity index. Outcome measurements included recurrent hospitalization, and/or mortality due to: (a) all-cause, (b) alcohol-related disorders and diseases (c) polydrug use (d) other psychiatric disorders.

    Findings: During the study period, 73.2% were hospitalized at least once, 57.3% were alcohol-related, 8.5% polydrug use and 18.5% psychiatric-related diagnoses. Compared with LO:FC, EO:PP had higher risk for all-cause (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]= 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI]= 1.02—1.59) and alcohol-related (aHR= 1.34, 95% CI= 1.02—1.75) hospitalizations. Adjusted risks for polydrug-related hospitalization were 2.55, 95%CI= 1.04—6.27 for EO:MD and 2.62, 95%CI= 1.07—6.40 for EO:PP. Adjusted risk for psychiatric-related hospitalization was higher for LO:AD (aHR= 1.78, 95%CI= 1.16—2.73 and EO:PP (aHR= 2.03, 95%CI= 1.22—3.38).

    Conclusions: Older addiction service users in Sweden have varying risks of hospitalization due to alcohol use, polydrug use and psychiatric disorders. Older persons with problematic alcohol use who have multiple needs and are assessed in social services may benefit from earlier interventions with an integrated focus on substance use and mental health.

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