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  • 1.
    Annandale, Ellen
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, University of York, York, England.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Theorising women's health and health inequalities: shaping processes of the 'gender-biology nexus'.2018In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no sup3, p. 1-10, article id 1669353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the theoretical frameworks and conceptual tools we employ shape research outcomes by guiding research pathways, it is important that we subject them to ongoing critical reflection. A thoroughgoing analysis of the global production of women's health inequality calls for a comprehensive theorization of how social relations of gender and the biological body mutually interact in local contexts in a nexus with women's health. However, to date, the predominant concern of research has been to identify the biological effects of social relations of gender on the body, to the relative neglect of the co-constitutive role that these biological changes themselves may play in ongoing cycles of gendered health oppressions. Drawing on feminist and gender theoretical approaches, and with the health of women and girls as our focus, we seek to extend our understanding of this recursive process by discussing what we call the 'shaping processes' of the 'gender-biology nexus' which call attention to not only the 'gender-shaping of biology' but also the 'biologic-shaping of gender'. We consider female genital mutilation/cutting as an illustration of this process and conclude by proposing that a framework which attends to both the 'gender-shaping of biology' and the 'biologic-shaping of gender' as interweaving processes provides a fruitful approach to theorising the wider health inequalities experienced by women and girls.

  • 2. Lallukka, Tea
    et al.
    Mekuria, Gashaw B.
    Nummi, Tapio
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden and Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Co-occurrence of depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms: trajectories from adolescence to midlife using group-based joint trajectory analysis2019In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, article id 236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Co-occurrence of mental and somatic symptoms is common, and recent longitudinal studies have identified single trajectories of these symptoms, but it is poorly known whether the symptom trajectories can also co-occur and change across the lifespan. We aimed to examine co-occurring symptoms and their joint trajectories from adolescence to midlife.

    Methods: Longitudinal data were derived from Northern Sweden, where 506 girls and 577 boys aged 16years participated at baseline in 1981 (99.7% of those initially invited), and have been followed up in four waves until the age of 43. Survey data were collected about depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms. Potential joint development of this three-component symptom set was examined with multiple response trajectory analysis, a method that has not been previously used to study co-occurrence of these symptoms.

    Results: We identified a five trajectory solution as the best: very low (19%), low (31%), high (22%), late sharply increasing (16%) and a very high increasing (12%). In the late sharply increasing and very high increasing groups the scores tended to increase with age, while in the other groups the levels were more stable. Overall, the results indicated that depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms co-exist from adolescence to midlife.

    Conclusions: The multiple response trajectory analysis confirmed high stability in the co-occurrence of depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms from adolescence to midlife. Clinicians should consider these findings to detect symptoms in their earliest phase in order to prevent the development of co-occurring high levels of symptoms.

  • 3.
    Linander, Ida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Alm, Erika
    Hammarström, Anne
    Harryson, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    (Un)safe spaces, affective labour and perceived health among people with trans experiences living in Sweden2019In: Culture, Health and Sexuality, ISSN 1369-1058, E-ISSN 1464-5351, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 914-928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of safe space has been connected to ill health among people with trans experiences. This study analyses trans people’s experiences of being in public, semi-public and community spaces using the analytical concept of safety/unsafety in relation to perceived health. The analytic framework draws on the concepts of cisgenderism, orientation, lines and comfort. The material analysed consisted of 18 individual interviews with people with trans experiences, which were analysed using constructivist thematic analysis. The analysis resulted in the identification of three themes: straightening devices creating limited living space, orienting oneself in (cis)gendered spaces and creating safer (?) community spaces for healing. Experiences of unsafety ranged from incidents and fear of different kinds of violence in public and semi-public spaces to the lack of a transpolitically informed agenda in, for example, feminist spaces. Safer spaces helped participants to feel a sense of belonging, to share their experiences and to heal. Experiences of unsafety and discomfort are important as they will help us to understand the health situations of people with trans experiences. It is important to facilitate the creation of safer spaces to improve the health of members of this group.

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