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  • 1. Ward, Heather A.
    et al.
    Gayle, Alicia
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Merritt, Melissa
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Katzke, Verena
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Kyrozis, Andreas
    Palli, Domenico
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Quiros, Jose Ramon
    Agudo, Antonio
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Larranaga, Nerea
    Huerta, Jose M.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Drake, Isabel
    Sandström, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Riboli, Elio
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Meat and haem iron intake in relation to glioma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study2018In: European Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 0959-8278, E-ISSN 1473-5709, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 379-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diets high in red or processed meat have been associated positively with some cancers, and several possible underlying mechanisms have been proposed, including iron-related pathways. However, the role of meat intake in adult glioma risk has yielded conflicting findings because of small sample sizes and heterogeneous tumour classifications. The aim of this study was to examine red meat, processed meat and iron intake in relation to glioma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. In this prospective cohort study, 408751 individuals from nine European countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine intake of red meat, processed meat, total dietary iron and haem iron in relation to incident glioma. During an average follow-up of 14.1 years, 688 incident glioma cases were diagnosed. There was no evidence that any of the meat variables (red, processed meat or subtypes of meat) or iron (total or haem) were associated with glioma; results were unchanged when the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded. This study suggests that there is no association between meat or iron intake and adult glioma. This is the largest prospective analysis of meat and iron in relation to glioma and as such provides a substantial contribution to a limited and inconsistent literature.

  • 2. Ward, Heather A.
    et al.
    Murphy, Neil
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Leitzmann, Michael F.
    Aglago, Elom
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Jenab, Mazda
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Severi, Gianluca
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Overvad, Kim
    Merino, Susana
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Masala, Giovanna
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Van Gils, Carla
    Nyström, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Rutegård, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Riboli, Elio
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Gallstones and incident colorectal cancer in a large pan-European cohort study2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 145, no 6, p. 1510-1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gallstones, a common gastrointestinal condition, can lead to several digestive complications and can result in inflammation. Risk factors for gallstones include obesity, diabetes, smoking and physical inactivity, all of which are known risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC), as is inflammation. However, it is unclear whether gallstones are a risk factor for CRC. We examined the association between history of gallstones and CRC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, a prospective cohort of over half a million participants from ten European countries. History of gallstones was assessed at baseline using a self‐reported questionnaire. The analytic cohort included 334,986 participants; a history of gallstones was reported by 3,917 men and 19,836 women, and incident CRC was diagnosed among 1,832 men and 2,178 women (mean follow‐up: 13.6 years). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between gallstones and CRC were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by sex, study centre and age at recruitment. The models were adjusted for body mass index, diabetes, alcohol intake and physical activity. A positive, marginally significant association was detected between gallstones and CRC among women in multivariable analyses (HR = 1.14, 95%CI 0.99–1.31, p = 0.077). The relationship between gallstones and CRC among men was inverse but not significant (HR = 0.81, 95%CI 0.63–1.04, p = 0.10). Additional adjustment for details of reproductive history or waist circumference yielded minimal changes to the observed associations. Further research is required to confirm the nature of the association between gallstones and CRC by sex.

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