Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Liljegren, Axel Risinger
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science-Neurosciences, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Camilla
    Department of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe D.
    Department of Clinical Science-Neurosciences, Sweden.
    Sundström, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Cerebrovascular pressure reactivity measures: index comparison and clinical outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury treated according to an intracranial pressure–focused management2023In: Neurotrauma Reports, E-ISSN 2689-288X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 848-856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate whether the pressure reactivity indices PRx, long-PRx (L-PRx), and pressure reactivity (PR) are interchangeable as measures of vascular reactivity, and whether they correlate with clinical outcome when an intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted treatment regimen is applied in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients with TBI (n = 29) that arrived at the hospital within 24 h of injury were included. PRx and L-PRx were derived from Pearson correlations between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and ICP over a short- and long-time interval. PR was the regression coefficient between the hourly mean values of ICP and MAP. Indices were compared to each other, parameters at admission, and outcome assessed by the extended Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) at 6 and 12 months. PRx and L-PRx had the strongest correlation with each other (R = 0.536, p < 0.01). A correlation was also noted between L-PRx and PR (R = 0.475, p < 0.01), but not between PRx and PR. A correlation was found between age and PRx (R = 0.482, p = 0.01). No association with outcome for any of the indices was found. PRx/L-PRx and L-PRx/PR were moderately correlated with each other. Age was associated with PRx. None of the indices correlated with outcome when our ICP treatment regime was applied. Part of our null hypothesis, that the three indices are associated with outcome, must be rejected. There was, however, an association between some of the indices. To further understand the relation of treatment regimes and pressure reactivity indices, a larger, randomized study is warranted.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Lundström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Eliasson, Håkan
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Holter study of heart rate variability in children and adolescents with long QT syndromeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Lundström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Assessment of arrhythmias and heart rate response in healthy adolescents performing face immersion and body submersion in ice-cold waterManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lundström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Winbo, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Department of Physiology, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Eliasson, Håkan
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Cardiac response to water activities in children with Long QT syndrome type 12023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 12, article id e0295431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Swimming is a genotype-specific trigger in long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1).

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the autonomic response to water activities in children and adolescents with LQT1.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, LQT1 patients were age and sex matched to one healthy control subject. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded during face immersion (FI), swimming, diving, and whole-body submersion (WBS). Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) was measured. The high frequency (HF) component of HRV was interpreted to reflect parasympathetic activity, while the low frequency (LF) component was interpreted as reflecting the combined influence of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity on autonomic nervous modulation of the heart.

    RESULTS: Fifteen LQT1 patients (aged 7-19 years, all on beta-blocker therapy) and fifteen age and sex matched non-medicated controls were included. No significant ventricular arrhythmias were observed in the LQT1 population during the water activities. Out of these 15 matched pairs, 12 pairs managed to complete FI and WBS for more than 10 seconds and were subsequently included in HR and HRV analyses. In response to FI, the LQT1 group experienced a drop in HR of 48 bpm, compared to 67 bpm in the control group (p = 0.006). In response to WBS, HR decreased by 48 bpm in the LQT1 group and 70 bpm in the control group (p = 0.007). A significantly lower PTOT (p < 0.001) and HF (p = 0.011) component was observed before, during and after FI in LQT1 patients compared with the controls. Before, during and after WBS, a significantly lower total power (p < 0.001), LF (p = 0.002) and HF (p = 0.006) component was observed in the LQT1 patients.

    CONCLUSION: A significantly lower HR decrease in response to water activities was observed in LQT1 subjects on beta-blocker therapy, compared to matched non-medicated controls. The data suggests an impaired parasympathetic response in LQT1 children and adolescents. An aberrant autonomic nervous system (ANS) response may cause an autonomic imbalance in this patient group.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Surano, Solmaz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Neurosciences.
    Grip, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Neurosciences.
    Faergemann, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Neurosciences. Sundsvall Regional Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Bjurman, Maria
    Sollefteå Hospital, Region Västernorrland, Sollefteå, Sweden.
    Davidsson, Hugo
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindell, Ellen
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Region Västra Götaland, Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    Mathé, Jan
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet and Capio S:t Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tjernström, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Othorhinolaryngology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tomanovic, Tatjana
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granåsen, Gabriel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Salzer, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Neurosciences.
    Internet-based vestibular rehabilitation versus standard care after acute onset vertigo: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2022In: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dizziness and vertigo affect around 15% of adults annually and represent common reasons for contacting health services, accounting for around 3% of all emergency department visits worldwide. Vertigo is also associated with excessive use of diagnostic imaging and emergency care and decreased productivity, primarily because of work absenteeism. Vestibular rehabilitation is an evidence-based treatment for chronic dizziness and supervised group exercise therapy has recently been shown to be effective after vestibular neuritis, a common cause of acute onset vertigo. However, such interventions are not readily available and there is a need for more easily accessible tools. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on vestibular symptoms of a 6-week online vestibular rehabilitation tool after acute onset vertigo, with the aim of aiding vestibular rehabilitation by presenting a more accessible tool that can help to reduce recovery time. Methods: Three hundred twenty individuals diagnosed with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) will be recruited from multiple hospitals in Sweden and the effects of an online vestibular rehabilitation tool, YrselTräning, on vestibular symptoms after acute onset vertigo will be compared to standard care (written instructions leaflet) in a two-armed, evaluator-blinded, multicenter randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome will be the Vertigo Symptom Scale Short Form (VSS-SF) score at 6 weeks after symptom onset. Secondary outcomes include effects of the intervention on activities of daily living, mood and anxiety, vestibular function recovery, mobility measures, health economic effects, and the reliability of the Swedish VSS-SF translation. Discussion: Participants using the online vestibular rehabilitation tool are expected to recover earlier and to a greater extent from their symptoms as compared to standard care. Since up to 50% of people with AVS without treatment develop persistent symptoms, effective treatment of AVS will likely lead to a higher quality of life and help reduce the societal costs associated with dizziness and vertigo. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT05056324. Registered on September 24, 2021.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf