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  • 1.
    af Bjerkén, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Lundblad, Martin
    Pomerleau, Francois
    Gerhardt, Greg A.
    Strömberg, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    L-DOPA conversion to dopamine in the rat dopamine-depleted striatumManuscript (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Chermenina, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Schouten, P
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Johansson, F
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Orädd, Greger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Strömberg, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    GDNF is important for striatal organization and maintenance of dopamine neurons grown in the presence of the striatum2014In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 270, 1-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exerts neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on neurons and GDNF plays a significant role in maintenance of the dopamine neurons utilizing grafting to create a nigrostriatal microcircuit of Gdnf knockout (Gdnf(-/-)) tissue. To further evaluate the role of GDNF on organization of the nigrostriatal system, single or double grafts of ventral mesencephalon (VM) and lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) with mismatches in Gdnf genotypes were performed. The survival of single grafts was monitored utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cell survival and graft organization were evaluated with immunohistochemistry. The results revealed that the size of VM single grafts did not change over time independent of genotype, while the size of the LGE transplants was significantly reduced already at 2weeks postgrafting when lacking GDNF. Lack of GDNF did not significantly affect the survival of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in single VM grafts. However, the survival of TH-positive neurons was significantly reduced in VM derived from Gdnf(+/+) when co-grafted with LGE from the Gdnf(-/-) tissue. In contrast, lack of GDNF in the VM portion of co-grafts had no effect on the survival of TH-positive neurons when co-grafted with LGE from Gdnf(+/+) mice. The TH-positive innervation of co-grafts was sparse when the striatal co-grafts were derived from the Gdnf(-/-) tissue while dense and patchy when innervating LGE producing GDNF. The TH-positive innervation overlapped with the organization of dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein-relative molecular mass 32,000 (DARPP-32)-positive neurons, that was disorganized in LGE lacking GDNF production. In conclusion, GDNF is important for a proper striatal organization and for survival of TH-positive neurons in the presence of the striatal tissue.

  • 3. Kumar, Anmol
    et al.
    Kopra, Jaakko
    Varendi, Kart
    Porokuokka, Lauriina L.
    Panhelainen, Anne
    Kuure, Satu
    Marshall, Pepin
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Harma, Mari-Anne
    Vilenius, Carolina
    Lillevaeli, Kersti
    Tekko, Triin
    Mijatovic, Jelena
    Pulkkinen, Nita
    Jakobson, Madis
    Jakobson, Maili
    Ola, Roxana
    Palm, Erik
    Lindahl, Maria
    Strömberg, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Voikar, Vootele
    Piepponen, T. Petteri
    Saarma, Mart
    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle
    GDNF Overexpression from the Native Locus Reveals its Role in the Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic System Function2015In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 11, no 12, e1005710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is the principal lesion in Parkinson's disease. Because glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes survival of dopamine neurons in vitro and in vivo, intracranial delivery of GDNF has been attempted for Parkinson's disease treatment but with variable success. For improving GDNF-based therapies, knowledge on physiological role of endogenous GDNF at the sites of its expression is important. However, due to limitations of existing genetic model systems, such knowledge is scarce. Here, we report that prevention of transcription of Gdnf 3'UTR in Gdnf endogenous locus yields GDNF hypermorphic mice with increased, but spatially unchanged GDNF expression, enabling analysis of postnatal GDNF function. We found that increased level of GDNF in the central nervous system increases the number of adult dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the number of dopaminergic terminals in the dorsal striatum. At the functional level, GDNF levels increased striatal tissue dopamine levels and augmented striatal dopamine release and re-uptake. In a proteasome inhibitor lactacystin-induced model of Parkinson's disease GDNF hypermorphic mice were protected from the reduction in striatal dopamine and failure of dopaminergic system function. Importantly, adverse phenotypic effects associated with spatially unregulated GDNF applications were not observed. Enhanced GDNF levels up-regulated striatal dopamine transporter activity by at least five fold resulting in enhanced susceptibility to 6-OHDA, a toxin transported into dopamine neurons by DAT. Further, we report how GDNF levels regulate kidney development and identify microRNAs miR-9, miR-96, miR-133, and miR-146a as negative regulators of GDNF expression via interaction with Gdnf 3'UTR in vitro. Our results reveal the role of GDNF in nigrostriatal dopamine system postnatal development and adult function, and highlight the importance of correct spatial expression of GDNF. Furthermore, our results suggest that 3'UTR targeting may constitute a useful tool in analyzing gene function.

  • 4.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Dysfunction in the nigrostriatal system: effects of L-DOPA and GDNF2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinson’s disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by nigrostriatal dopamine loss, with motor deficiencies as the primary outcome. To increase the striatal dopamine content, patients are treated with 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (l-DOPA). Beneficial relief of the motor symptoms is achieved initially, although the efficacy is lost with time and severe side effects, referred to as l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, manifest in the majority of patients. Biological mechanisms responsible for the dopaminergic degeneration and the upcoming of dyskinesia are still unclear, and thus knowledge regarding critical factors for maintenance of the nigrostriatal system as well as neurochemical changes upon chronic l-DOPA is urgent. The present work aims at studying the importance of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for nigrostriatal preservation, and the involvement of the dopaminergic, serotonergic, and glutamatergic systems in l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Effects from different levels of GDNF expression were evaluated on fetal mouse nigrostriatal tissue in a grafting study. In GDNF gene-deleted grafts, degeneration of the entire nigrostriatal system was evident at 6 months. In grafts with partial GDNF expression, significant loss of dopamine neurons was observed at later time points, although deviant findings in the dopamine integrity such as reduced innervation capacity and presence of intracellular inclusions-like structures were already present at earlier stages. The results emphasize GDNF as a crucial factor for long-term maintenance of the nigrostriatal system. Furthermore, striatal neurochemical alterations upon chronic l-DOPA treatment were studied in hemiparkinsonian rats using in vivo voltametry. The findings demonstrated impaired dopamine as well as glutamate releases in dyskinetic subjects, with no effects from acute l-DOPA administration. Conversely, in l-DOPA naïve dopamine-lesioned animals, dopamine release was increased and glutamate release attenuated upon a l-DOPA challenge. Moreover, l-DOPA-derived dopamine release was demonstrated to originate from serotonergic nerve fibers in the dopamine-lesioned striatum, an event that contributes significantly to dopamine levels also in intact striatum, and thus, is not a consequence from dopamine depletion. Assessment of serotonergic nerve fibers in l-DOPA treated animals and in a grafting study concluded that nerve fiber density was not affected by chronic l-DOPA treatment, nevertheless, dysfunction of this system can be suspected in dyskinetic animals since dopamine release was impaired and regulation of glutamate release by serotonergic 5-HT1A receptor activation was achieved in normal but not in dyskinetic animals. Furthermore, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuated l-DOPA-induced dyskientic behavior, an effect that was demonstrated to be mediated via 5-HT1A receptors. In conclusion, dysmodulation of multiple transmitter systems is evident in LID. 

  • 5.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    The role of serotonergic nerve fibers in conversion of L-DOPA into dopamineManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology. nina.nevalainen@diagrad.umu.se.
    Af Bjerkén, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Gerhardt, G A
    Department of Anatomy, Neurobiology, and Neurology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USA.
    Strömberg, Iingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Serotonergic nerve fibers in l-DOPA-derived dopamine release and dyskinesia2014In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 260, 73-86 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine) system has been assigned a key role in the development of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (l-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia, mainly due to 5-HT neuronal ability to decarboxylate l-DOPA into dopamine. Nevertheless, knowledge of l-DOPA-induced events that could lead to development of dyskinesias are limited and therefore the present work has evaluated (i) the role of the 5-HT system in l-DOPA-derived dopamine synthesis when dopamine neurons are present, (ii) l-DOPA-induced effects on striatal dopamine release and clearance, and on 5-HT nerve fiber density, and (iii) the behavioral outcome of altered 5-HT transmission in dyskinetic rats. Chronoamperometric recordings demonstrated attenuated striatal l-DOPA-derived dopamine release (∼30%) upon removal of 5-HT nerve fibers in intact animals. Interestingly, four weeks of daily l-DOPA treatment yielded similar-sized dopamine peak amplitudes in intact animals as found after a 5-HT-lesion. Moreover, chronic l-DOPA exposure attenuated striatal 5-HT nerve fiber density in the absence of dopamine nerve terminals. Furthermore, fluoxetine-induced altered 5-HT transmission blocked dyskinetic behavior via action on 5-HT1A receptors. Taken together, the results indicate a central role for the 5-HT system in l-DOPA-derived dopamine synthesis and in dyskinesia, and therefore potential l-DOPA-induced deterioration of 5-HT function might reduce l-DOPA efficacy as well as promote the upcoming of motor side effects.

  • 7.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Af Bjerkén, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Lundblad, Martin
    Department of Experimental Medical Science, Lund University.
    Gerhardt, Greg A
    Anatomy, Neurobiology, and Neurology, University of Kentucky Med Center, Lexington, KY, USA.
    Strömberg, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Dopamine release from serotonergic nerve fibers is reduced in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia2011In: Journal of Neurochemistry, ISSN 0022-3042, E-ISSN 1471-4159, Vol. 118, no 1, 12-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    L-DOPA is the most commonly used treatment for symptomatic control in patients with Parkinson's disease. Unfortunately, most patients develop severe side-effects, such as dyskinesia, upon chronic l-DOPA treatment. The patophysiology of dyskinesia is unclear; however, involvement of serotonergic nerve fibers in converting l-DOPA to dopamine has been suggested. Therefore, potassium-evoked dopamine release was studied after local application of l-DOPA in the striata of normal, dopamine- and dopamine/serotonin-lesioned l-DOPA naïve, and dopamine-denervated chronically l-DOPA-treated dyskinetic rats using in vivo chronoamperometry. The results revealed that local l-DOPA administration into normal and intact hemisphere of dopamine-lesioned l-DOPA naïve animals significantly increased the potassium-evoked dopamine release. l-DOPA application also increased the dopamine peak amplitude in the dopamine-depleted l-DOPA naïve striatum, although these dopamine levels were several-folds lower than in the normal striatum, whereas no increased dopamine release was found in the dopamine/serotonin-denervated striatum. In dyskinetic animals, local l-DOPA application did not affect the dopamine release, resulting in significantly attenuated dopamine levels compared with those measured in l-DOPA naïve dopamine-denervated striatum. To conclude, l-DOPA is most likely converted to dopamine in serotonergic nerve fibers in the dopamine-depleted striatum, but the dopamine release is several-fold lower than in normal striatum. Furthermore, l-DOPA loading does not increase the dopamine release in dyskinetic animals as found in l-DOPA naïve animals, despite similar density of serotonergic innervation. Thus, the dopamine overflow produced from the serotonergic nerve fibers appears not to be the major cause of dyskinetic behavior.

  • 8.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Chermenina, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Rehnmark, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Berglöf, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Marschinke, Franziska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Strömberg, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for long-term maintenance of the nigrostriatal system2010In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 171, no 4, 1357-1366 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent factor for the ventral mesencephalic dopamine neurons. However, studies on the Gdnf gene deleted (Gdnf(-/-)) mouse have been limited to fetal tissue since these mice die prematurely. To evaluate long-term effects of Gdnf gene deletion, this study involves co-grafts of ventral mesencephalon (VM) and lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) derived from different Gdnf genotypes. The VM/LGE co-grafts were evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) -positive cell survival and nerve fiber formation in the LGE co-transplant, visualized by dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein relative molecular mass 32,000 (DARPP-32) -immunoreactivity. Cell counts revealed no difference in TH-positive neurons between Gdnf genotypes at 3 months postgrafting. At 6 months, a significant reduction in cell number was observed in the Gdnf(-/-) grafts. In fact, in the majority of the Gdnf(-/-) VM/LGE transplant had degenerated. At 12 months, a reduction in cell number was seen in both Gdnf(-/-) and Gdnf(+/-) compared to wild type transplants. In the Gdnf(-/-) grafts, TH-negative inclusion-like structures were present in the cytoplasm of the TH-positive neurons at 3 months. These structures were also found in the Gdnf(+/-) transplants at 12 months, but not in Gdnf(+/+) controls at any time point. In Gdnf(+/+) grafts, TH-positive nerve fiber innervation of the striatal co-grafts was dense and patchy and overlapped with clusters of DARPP-32-positive neurons. This overlap did mismatch in the Gdnf(+/-) grafts, while the TH-positive innervation was sparse in the Gdnf(-/-) transplants and the DARPP-32-positive neurons were widespread distributed. In conclusion, GDNF is essential for long-term maintenance of both the VM TH-positive neurons and for the striatal tissue, and appears crucial for generation of a proper organization of the striatum.

  • 9.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lundblad, Martin
    Lund University.
    Gerhardt, Greg A.
    University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington.
    Strömberg, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Histology and Cell Biology.
    Striatal Glutamate Release in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinetic Animals2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 2, e55706- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is a common side effect developed after chronic treatment with 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA) in Parkinson's disease. The biological mechanisms behind this side effect are not fully comprehended although involvement of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and glutamatergic systems has been suggested. The present study utilizes in vivo amperometry to investigate the impact from unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions and L-DOPA (4 mg/kg, including benserazide 15 mg/kg) -induced dyskinetic behavior on striatal basal extracellular glutamate concentration and potassium-evoked glutamate release in urethane-anesthetized rats. Recordings were performed before and after local L-DOPA application in the striatum. In addition, effects from the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (2R)-(+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OHDPAT; 1 mg/kg) was assessed on glutamate release and on dyskinetic behavior. The results revealed a bilateral similar to 30% reduction of basal extracellular glutamate concentration and attenuated potassium-evoked glutamate release after a unilateral dopamine-depletion in L-DOPA naive animals. In dyskinetic subjects, basal glutamate concentration was comparable to normal controls, although potassium-evoked glutamate release was reduced to similar levels as in drug naive dopamine-lesioned animals. Furthermore, acute striatal L-DOPA administration attenuated glutamate release in all groups, except in the dopamine-lesioned striatum of dyskinetic animals. Co-administration of 8-OHDPAT and L-DOPA decreased dyskinesia in dopamine-lesioned animals, but did not affect potassium-evoked glutamate release, which was seen in normal animals. These findings indicate altered glutamate transmission upon dopamine-depletion and dyskinesia.

  • 10.
    Nevalainen, Nina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Ögren, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lövdén, M
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Lindenberger, U
    Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.
    Bäckman, L
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    COBRA: A prospective multimodal imaging study of dopamine, brain structure and function, and cognition.2015In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1612, 83-103 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive decline is a characteristic feature of normal human aging. Previous work has demonstrated marked interindividual variability in onset and rate of decline. Such variability has been linked to factors such as maintenance of functional and structural brain integrity, genetics, and lifestyle. Still, few, if any, studies have combined a longitudinal design with repeated multimodal imaging and a comprehensive assessment of cognition as well as genetic and lifestyle factors. The present paper introduces the Cognition, Brain, and Aging (COBRA) study, in which cognitive performance and brain structure and function are measured in a cohort of 181 older adults aged 64 to 68 years at baseline. Participants will be followed longitudinally over a 10-year period, resulting in a total of three equally spaced measurement occasions. The measurement protocol at each occasion comprises a comprehensive set of behavioral and imaging measures. Cognitive performance is evaluated via computerized testing of working memory, episodic memory, perceptual speed, motor speed, implicit sequence learning, and vocabulary. Brain imaging is performed using positron emission tomography with [(11)C]-raclopride to assess dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for assessment of white and gray-matter integrity and cerebrovascular perfusion, and functional MRI maps brain activation during rest and active task conditions. Lifestyle descriptives are collected, and blood samples are obtained and stored for future evaluation. Here, we present selected results from the baseline assessment along with a discussion of sample characteristics and methodological considerations that determined the design of the study.

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